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Common Sense Iv


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hello friends and neighbors.

tis me the olde bald headed archie.

how many of you have been off in the woods, near a lake and found you ran out of water?

how many of you know what cryptosporidium and giardia parasites are?

are most of you aware that 90% of the water ways are contaminated in some form or another?

and finally, how many of you know how to purify water in an emergency?

the situation is your around 10 to 12 miles out on a long range, on foot, caching

expedition. you knew you were running low on water and now you have no water.

do you take a chance on dehydration, or do you take a chance on drinking lake water?

in the field certain situations demand an approiate action. in this case, the best action is to know how to purify water in an emergency. for reference from the epa please note this website: http://www.epa.gov/safewater/faq/emerg.html

i myself carry 2 % tinture of iodine and potable aqua tablets. for clear water 5 drops of iodine to 1 quart of water is sufficient, and for cloudy water 10 drops to a quart. it has to set for upto 1 hour. the potable water tablets are used 1 tab for 1 quart of clear water and 2 tablets for 1 quart of cloudy water. it has to sit for 30 minutes. the colder the water the less effective both of these methods are. according to the EPA boiling is the best way to kill microrganisms in water. PLEASE NOTE, THESE METHODS APPLY ONLY TO BACTERIOLOGICAL DECONTAMINATION OF WATER AND ARE INEFFECTIVE AGAINST CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION.

TO REMOVE CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS A PORTABLE WATER FILTRATION IS RECOMMENDED...THAT STATES IT CAN FILTER TO 1 MICRON OR LESS.

a good water purification system will state that it is also effective to filter out cryptosporidium and giardia as wall. the major drawback is the cost of these portable systems. i priced them within a range of 60.00 to as much as 129.00.

regards

archie

archeangelsk2002@yahoo.com

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I refuse to use iodine tabs. Yuck!

Snoo,

 

I used to feel the same.

 

Recently I did a 3-day hike where we were unsure of the availability of fresh water along the trail. We knew there was a stream nearby, so we carried a hefty amount of water, plus purification tablets, just in case.

 

Long story short, it's a good thing we brought the tablets. I'd purchased them at the local outdoors store. The salesman there recommended a product that had both the iodine, plus some sort of neutralizer.

 

Shore 'nuff, after putting in the neutralizer, not only did the water clear up considerably, but it tasted as good as any other water we had with us.

 

Perhaps we got lucky with a very clean source to get water from, but I have to say that I tasted not a hint of iodine in the water.

 

Give iodine (with neutralizer) another shot.

 

Jamie

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I use a Pur (now Katadyn) Hiker on backpacking trips, but geocaching trips aren't usually long enough for me to run out of water (I have a 3 Liter Unbottle in my pack).

 

I don't bring my purifier along on day hikes and geocache hunts, but I carry Potable Aqua pills along just in case. They make the water taste horrible, so I would only use them if I really had to.

 

I've seen the product that Jamie refers to, but I think its something like $10. The Potable Aqua pills I picked up for $3.99 in WalMart. I figure they're likely to expire before I ever get to use them, so no point in shelling out $10 for something I'm not likely to use.

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A water filter is great, I love my first-need filter, but I don't always bring it with me.

 

After a long caching day, that included my taking the wrong trail for an 8 mile detour and having to drink raw stream water, I now always carry a dropper bottle of clorox bleach. 4 drops will purify a quart of clear water (double if the water looks cloudy). Shake the contents, wait 20-30 minutes (loonger in cold weather), and loosen the lid to let some of the purified contents dribble on the cap and threads of your water bottle. I use an old visine bottle...MARKED "CLOROX"...this is important so that nobody accidentally bleaches their eyes (or it might be smarter to simply use another bottle :( ). I've used Clorox for years of camping, including in the ADKs, Utah, Northern Canada, and Ecuadorian rainforest, and it has worked for me.

 

nfa-jamie

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Heat to say it Ol Blad on but you statement is FALSE :

TO REMOVE CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS A PORTABLE WATER FILTRATION IS RECOMMENDED...THAT STATES IT CAN FILTER TO 1 MICRON OR LESS.

To remove chemical contamination it take a charcoal or ion exchange filter system. Even the biggest organic molecules are far less then 1 nicron. But I do agree that your primary concern is viral or bactrial contamination. Most places you do not need to worry about chemical contamination or you should know if you do.

 

cheers

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NFA and sorry to tell you but Clorine is NOT affective agenst crypt and many other cyst forming bacteria. A friend of mine is one of the major researchers in the area of crypt and geradia contamination in Neveada and he says that clorine does NOT work. Get Polar Pure and your be set it cost about $10.00 and will last for 2000 gallons. If you dont like the taste of Iodine the add a vitamin C tablet after 30 minute waiting period. Also if you boil you water you only need to bring it to a boil and that is good enough you DO NOT have to let it boil for 10 minutes, that is a urban myth. Protiens break down at 160 to 180 degree F and so that is enought to destroy any microbe.

cheers

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NFA and sorry to tell you but Clorine is NOT affective agenst crypt and many other cyst forming bacteria.  A friend of mine is one of the major researchers in the area of crypt and geradia contamination in Neveada and he says that clorine does NOT work.  Get Polar Pure and your be set it cost about $10.00 and will last for 2000 gallons.  If you dont like the taste of Iodine the add a vitamin C tablet after 30 minute waiting period.  Also if you boil you water you only need to bring it to a boil and that is good enough you DO NOT have to let it boil for 10 minutes, that is a urban myth.  Protiens break down at 160 to 180 degree F and so that is enought to destroy any microbe.

cheers

Hi,

 

While you're right that clorox works against lots of bugs but is largely ineffective against cryptosporidium, before people go out and invest in iodine treatments in their various forms it should be noted that iodine (including polar pure) has also been shown to be largely ineffective in treating cryptosporidium and other cysts.

 

To fully insure you are drinking safe water, you should filter it through a filter such as the first need or katadyn. I use a first need, and bring the clorox along as a backup for emergencies, for which purpose it has worked wonderfully over the years at a tiny fraction the cost of iodine (not to mention the taste difference).

 

nfa-jamie

Edited by NFA
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    a good water purification system will state that it is also effective to filter out cryptosporidium and giardia as wall. the major drawback is the cost of these portable systems. i priced them within a range of 60.00 to as much as 129.00.

regards

archie

archeangelsk2002@yahoo.com

 

The cost isn't that bad....think of it this way, either pay for the filter, or get a cryptosporidium, giardia, or cyclospora infection, then endure the diarrhea, and stomach pain that goes along with it, you'll miss work, don't expect any drugs, parasitic infections are treated as self limiting. In order to diagnose a parasitic infection, unless its blood parasite like malaria (which is making a comeback in the Washington DC area and south), you'll have to endure the embarassment of chitting in a cup for the lab tests. SO by this time, you have missed work, have to pay for your labs, and a Dr.'s visit, and be uncomfortable. Some parasitic infections can last for almost 4 months, depending on your original healh status when you picked up the parasite, like if you have lupus and take immunosuppressives.

 

...Giardia, along with cryptosporidium is also chlorine resistant. One of them is also formulin (a preservative) resistnat, but i don't remember which parasite that would be. People have been known to get Giardia from swimming pools.

 

edit - i can't spell.

Edited by Polgara
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I use a Pur Hiker (ah-ha, I note in a previous post I'm not the only, er... long-time -old- hiker/backpacker!). Just for good measure, I throw in Iodine tablets into the purified water.

 

Septic, boiling is way too much effort. Plus, with the new Geocacher's Code and all, fires are not acceptable any longer. Soooo.... I only hike/cache on very rainy days and just stick out my tounge.... B)

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Thought I would add my two cents. About two years back there was an article written about water purity in california. It was found that drinking water our of mountain streams was safer than drinking the tap water in San Francisco. Of course I know there are a number of places I know I wouldn't drink the water, but this article suggested that if the water was moving and was relatively cool then there wasn't a very good chance of getting sick.

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I use a charcoal filter that filters out 99% of giardia and cryptosporidium. It is on a water bottle. The only problem I have is that running water up here in Alaska is often filled with silt, which clogs the filter. So I have to find a smaller stream (which you want to do anyway) and try to stay away from the big rivers. It was only $20.

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Long before I was a cacher I had an old bulky charcoal filter for hiking. After it broke, I tried iodine once (icky!!!!!). I am now looking at a new filter, but might try Jaime's suggestion in the short term if needed. But with winter here, I suppose I won't be doing any long or overnight hikes before I can afford a good filter.

Edited by carleenp
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I use a SweetWater filter for when I go backpacking. It has several filtering processes, and the water even comes out tasting...well..sweet. You can add chlorine(included with filter) before you filter(if you carry a container to filter from so you do not have to bend over the creek). They even come with different hose attachments so you can latch on to your bottle and not get the hose dirty.

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I have my First Need and Camelbak set up with a quick disconnect so I don't have to take the backpack off to refill. Just step into the creek, quick click the bite valve off, quick click the return hose in place and a few quick strokes later, I'm walking down the path putting the purifier back in the pouch attached to the waist belt.

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Katadyn all the way. The pumping can be irritating but the water from the Washington cascade streams is cool and delicious.

 

Your state may vary :P

Yeah, if you saw some of the streams in Nebraska, you would likely not trust the filter and carry lots of water. Think lots of cow doot and chemicals! :P

 

Of course in Nebraska there are not many long or overnight hikes either. So fortunately carrying water is no biggie. But unfortunately in Nebraska, as much as I love it, there are not many long or overnight hikes either. :(

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Katadyn all the way. The pumping can be irritating but the water from the Washington cascade streams is cool and delicious.

 

Your state may vary :P

I had a Katadyn mini filter. Cost me $140. It was such a pain in the rear to use (hard to pump, abysmal flow rate, easily clogged filter and tough to aim) that I gave it away for free to some college student who was looking for a filter on a backcoutry newsgroup. I even paid shipping to get it out of my sight. That poor kid is stuck with the thing now.

 

After a little research I chose a Pur Hiker. It's bigger than my old Katadyn, but way easier to use. It has a nice flow rate and hasn't clogged in 5 years of use. Katadyn bought Pur, so its now made by them, but its still far better than that mini filter.

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My personal choice is a bit out of your stated price range, but it does the trick and I refuse to use iodine tabs. Yuck!

 

I carry a Katydyn everywhere I go. ;)

Amen brother ...

 

I now use the Katadyn Endurance Series Pocket MicrofilterPocket_Produktseite.gif

 

If I recall, the directions on the iodine tablets highly suggest not using the product unless it is an emergency and definitely not prolonged use. Iodine can not be good for your body if its used too much. Before we started filtering our water, myself and others in our party did suffer dysentary (it takes you out of commission for at least 24 hrs.). Think I would rather suffer dysentary (again) than have to be hospitalized for iodine poisoning.

 

Every year we go into the wilderness for 4 to 7 days at a time. Over the years we have used many different 'hand pump' water filtration systems. The Katadyn Pocket filter has been the best performing filter.

 

On the Katadyn pictured above, the base has a rubber ring that allows you to 'anchor' the filter on a rock or the side of a canoe if you're on a lake. By anchoring the base, it takes A LOT less muscle power to fill a water bladder. It has a lifetime warranty and it has proven to be better ergonomically designed than several other filters we have tried.

 

But as with most things, what is good for one person may not be so for another ...

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If I recall, the directions on the iodine tablets highly suggest not using the product unless it is an emergency and definitely not prolonged use. Iodine can not be good for your body if its used too much. Before we started filtering our water, myself and others in our party did suffer dysentary (it takes you out of commission for at least 24 hrs.). Think I would rather suffer dysentary (again) than have to be hospitalized for iodine poisoning.

I saw this on wildsurvival.com:

 

Water treatment "purification" tablets release chlorine or iodine. They are inexpensive and available at most sporting goods stores and some drugstores. Follow the package directions carefully.

 

NOTE: People with hidden or chronic liver or kidney disease may be adversely affected by iodized tablets and may experience worsened health problems as a result of ingestion. Iodized tablets are safe for healthy, physically fit adults and should be used only if you lack the supplies for boiling, chlorination and distillation.

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I own a Purr and a Sweatwater system both. One thing I would like to add is that for those of you who are new to hiking and the use of water filters there are a few things you can do to maintain your water filter, 1st. read all the directions, when you get back from a trip in which you have used your filter clean it and store according to the manufactures recomendations. Durring my many years in the outdoors industry I had many people come into the store complaing that their filter was not working anymore, most of the time this was because they just put the filter away when they got home without following the manufactures directions. Remember, any living organism that you trap my mulitply over a period of time and given enought time, with clog the filter element.

Also, if you are on an overnight trip, if you can set a pail of water asside over night, it will allow any sedement to settle to the bottom of the pail, then when you fill your bottle, keep the intake hear the top, this will help to extend your filters life.

The same holds true when filling your bottle direct from a stream, keep the intake just below surface, not topughing the bottom.

and read all the directions

Edited by JohnnyVegas
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Katadyn all the way. The pumping can be irritating but the water from the Washington cascade streams is cool and delicious.

 

Your state may vary  :laughing:

I had a Katadyn mini filter. Cost me $140. It was such a pain in the rear to use (hard to pump, abysmal flow rate, easily clogged filter and tough to aim) that I gave it away for free to some college student who was looking for a filter on a backcoutry newsgroup. I even paid shipping to get it out of my sight. That poor kid is stuck with the thing now.

 

After a little research I chose a Pur Hiker. It's bigger than my old Katadyn, but way easier to use. It has a nice flow rate and hasn't clogged in 5 years of use. Katadyn bought Pur, so its now made by them, but its still far better than that mini filter.

Well, I'm of the other school. I have the mini and love it. I don't worry about aiming it, as it fits right on the hose of my CamelBak (and I carry a short hose for other bottles when I need them). The rate is slow (but am I in that big a rush?), but the weight is less than other filters (less than 1/2 pound) and it's small - so I can carry it any where, all the time. As for clogging, I haven't had it do so in the 4 years I've used it - maybe you were using 'cloudy' water (a pre-filter would be nice) - and the filter is field cleanable. It will also last about 10 times as long as most filters (2000 gallons vs. 2-400 gallons) for about twice the price. I wish I was around when you gave yours away, I'd love to have a second (so I wouldn't have to switch from kit to kit).

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