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Alphabet Game


BooBooBee
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I'm working on a 26-stage cache to give our locals a bit of a challenege. I've already named each location on this 320-mile trek, but if I place them in a timely manner, I won't be able to place them in alphabetical order. Have thought of several ways to do this one, but can't seem to settle.

 

Random thoughts - what do YOU think?:

a) all 26 stages need to be completed to log the cache (Personally...I like to log each find, but how can I create a 27th cache for a "bonus log" and, without taking an AGE to keep track of it all, keep track of everyone's A-Z effort?)

:lol: allow each stage to be logged, but list only the first coordinate with instructions to follow the cache path (with coords in each ensuing cache). If so:

b1) must the caches be found in alphabetical order? Does it make any sense to do them out of order (except for the obvious sense of saving gas)

b2) does it detract from the game or add to the intrigue if they are NOT placed in alphabetical order, but some apparently random order ('til you've found them all and discover the mystery shape)

 

I'd like the "Z" cache (or final cache, which, if I do it by shortest mileage, would be the "F" cache) to have a great FTF incentive, too. Doesn't make sense to make big deal out of completing the 26-stage puzzle if one doesn't have to follow coordinate order...in other words, if I just list 26 sep. caches, what's the point?

 

Do I make ANY sense? :)

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On a more topical note, I think they should be in the order of the shortest sentence that uses all the letters of the alphabet.

 

I remember the concent from the book "Ella Minnow Pea", but I can't remember the sentence.

The first sentence that came to mind was the one we used to use to test typewriters: "The quick brown fox jumps over a lazy dog." Interested in seeing if there was a shorter such sentence I found the following, which I thought you might also find intriguing.

 

"A pangram is a sentence that contains all letters of the alphabet. Less frequently, such sentences are called holalphabetic sentences. Interesting pangrams are generally short ones; constructing a sentence that includes the fewest repeat letters possible is a challenging task. However, pangrams that are slightly longer yet enlightening, humorous, or eccentric are noteworthy in their own right.

 

By far the most well-known pangram is, "The quick brown fox jumps over a lazy dog." Frequently this is the sentence used to test out new typewriters, presumably because it includes every letter of the alphabet. Curiously, this sentence is often misquoted by changing "jumps" to "jumped." The past tense version, lacking an s, is not a pangram. Often, too, it is misquoted as "the lazy dog" rather than "a lazy dog." This error is not as grievous; the sentence remains a pangram, just a slightly longer one.

 

Unfortunately, to my knowledge, there are no particularly clever 26 letter pangrams in English. Constructing a sentence that uses every letter of the alphabet once and no more -- essentially an anagram of the alphabet -- seems to require the use of acronyms, initials, and strange punctuation. The most interesting I've seen is, "Glum Schwartzkopf vex'd by NJ IQ."

 

Also note the section on autograms, as that contains some autograms (sentences that self-document their letter content) that are also pangrams."

 

http://rinkworks.com/words/pangrams.shtml

 

As for maintaining the 26...well, they're all actually on well traveled routes for our family, so it's not a big deal to return to them now and again as needed. The only hassle, really, is PLACING them all at once...especially if they need to go in alphabetical order. We'll see what shapes up...

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A year ago I started caching, and for that entire year there has been one 5-stage regular cache (city tour) on my first page. Finally did it last week, and enjoyed it. I just can't imagine doing one so long. Usually, more than 3 stages, and I pass. We actually had to sit down at Burger King and review a math mistake over lunch.

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I have one cache that hs 6 micros and a final regular cache container, a 3/1.5. But folks seem to reluctant to do it. Only one person has done complteed it so far. And another grp has tired but couldn't find one pt. All stages list the next stage. This has me asking as, I was told off on another cacher it was to hard and not worth it as the person could have done multiple 1/1 or a few 3/3 with a nice hike. So I it makes me think alls folks wants is NUMBERS. If they only get one smily for doing multiple finds then they dont seem interested. I dont know?????

cheers

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I understand your concept, but the logistics seem staggering. I don't think having them in order is terribly important, but to make it more attractive, I would suggest some thought to fuel economy for the searchers...

Logistics were JUST fine until I REALLY started to get organized. Then alphabetical order threw me off! (Yep...ignorance WAS bliss!)

 

For those who are into caching for the points, I'd like to list each of these stages seperately (See the Peace Point caches in Marin County, CA). But I'd like only to list the starting coords online, then supply ensuing coords on a cache-by-cache basis. (To find B, you've gotta find A, etc.) That way, there's still some degree of difficulty in completing the task and earning that 26th find in the series.

 

I'm not lacking ideas for cache locations, but wanted to make it more fun than simply making a bunch of individual caches. Then again...I just finished paging through the cammo forum! WHEW!

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For those who are into caching for the points, I'd like to list each of these stages seperately (See the Peace Point caches in Marin County, CA). But I'd like only to list the starting coords online, then supply ensuing coords on a cache-by-cache basis. (To find B, you've gotta find A, etc.) That way, there's still some degree of difficulty in completing the task and earning that 26th find in the series.

If A gives you coordinates for B, which gives you coordinates C...

That's a single multi-stage cache, and I imagine your approver would strongly suggest it be submitted as that, instead of 26 separate caches.

 

If they can each be done individually, that would be a different story.

 

I'd check with your approver first, before putting a lot of work into something.

Edited by Prime Suspect
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If A gives you coordinates for B, which gives you coordinates C...

That's a single multi-stage cache, and I imagine your approver would strongly suggest it be submitted as that, instead of 26 separate caches.

 

If they can each be done individually, that would be a different story.

 

I'd check with your approver first, before putting a lot of work into something.

Just learned that they'd have to be done as one multicache since they don't, by gc.com rules, qualify as individuals. But that's kinda a bummer. I suppose I'll put more work into individual caches rather than try this one at home. (Good idea to contact my local admin first...how does one find the local admin? Just click on one who approved a previous cache?)

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Make it a series of smaller multi caches with parts of the final coordinates at the end of each multi. That way you will satisfy the people who desire the numbers, it will still be challenging and you wont have to do any bookwork since anyone going after the final cache will have to complete all the others in order to get all the coordinates necessary to find it. :rolleyes:

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I have a fifteen stage multicache (the last of which you can see here). Each stage is loggable (has it's own cache page), which I like as passers by can just do a few of the base level caches without doing the whole thing.

If you are sure you can maintain the caches, create a page for each cache; I'm not entirely clear on what your plan is though.

MarcB

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I have a fifteen stage multicache (the last of which you can see here). Each stage is loggable (has it's own cache page), which I like as passers by can just do a few of the base level caches without doing the whole thing.

If you are sure you can maintain the caches, create a page for each cache; I'm not entirely clear on what your plan is though.

MarcB

You can make each stage a separate stand alone cache, each with a clue that gets you closer to the final. Each would have to all be listed on the Geocaching.com site and have a logbook. Of course, this would make them findable in any order, so this may not work for what you have in mind!

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I have a fifteen stage multicache (the last of which you can see here). Each stage is loggable (has it's own cache page), which I like as passers by can just do a few of the base level caches without doing the whole thing.

If you are sure you can maintain the caches, create a page for each cache; I'm not entirely clear on what your plan is though.

MarcB

You can make each stage a separate stand alone cache, each with a clue that gets you closer to the final. Each would have to all be listed on the Geocaching.com site and have a logbook. Of course, this would make them findable in any order, so this may not work for what you have in mind!

Actually, according to WestCoastAdmin, you're both wrong. Unfortunately. I created a 10-stage "test" cache this week. Listed every stage seperately. Included log book in every stage as well as the coords for the next stage. WestCoastAdmin said he/she consulted with SoCalAdmin (I think that's the right name) and they agreed this type of cache was NOT withing the GC.com rules.

 

Here's WestCoastAdmin's note to me:

"It is obvious you have invested much time and effort in placing these 10 caches. There are just a few issues that we need to work on. Please bear with me! I have read your notes, and understand what you are trying to do. I have discussed these caches with the other SoCal approver, and we are in concurrence with the following;

 

"A multicache is able to be logged as a find only on the final stage, not the intermediate stages. There is no distance guidelines between stages for a multicache.

 

"The way that you have these set up is not as a multi-cache, but as puzzle/mystery caches. (#2 to #10. #1 would be a traditional.) There is a distance guideline for this cache type of 1 to 2 miles maximum, so this series would not be able to be listed as a puzzle/mystery type, since you mention they are spread over 39 miles.

 

"I would strongly encourage you to consider making these 10 caches into one multicache. This would allow everything to stand, and a finder would be able to log ONE find for this series. Caches 2 thru 10 would be archived.

 

Of course, you also have the option of making ten individual traditional caches where the posted coordinates are the actual cache location."

 

SO, I archived stages 2-10 and posted this first multi- effort as a ONE find, as suggested. Weird, though, since I saw similar multi-stage caches with each stage loggable. (See the Peace Points, for example...I've seen others like this, but Bric's is the only one I can remember by name...I must relate with the intent of his effort!)

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Just an observation: there's a 3-cache series (Hunt for Pilatus) in Sydney, Australia that had a waypoint in 26 suburbs (Abbotsford, Bondi, Clovelly...... Zetland) that took us a couple of weekends to work through.

 

Many innovative waypoint ideas but very high maintenance (we were FTF and _we_ found some lost waypoints!)

 

So, it can be done!

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