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Foot Wear?


BigJon
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Well I went out yesterday and snagged my first couple of caches and I worn running shoes, very comfortable but not much on traction. I was wondering what most peeps wear while caching? I would like to get a nice hiking boot, any suggestions on brands and how good they wear and tear? All leather or some nylon? While I was in the military I had all leather and leather with some nylon, I really like the cooling of the nylon but catus will make short work of it. Let me know what you think.

 

texasgeocaching_sm.gif

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i wear asolo all leather boots walking, NB running shoes running, and sidi dominator mtn bike shoes if that's how i get to the cache.

for simple drive bys i don't even take off my merrell clogs.

 

it doesn't matter if you get to camp at one or at six. dinner is still at six.

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Depends on where the cache is. For most caches, where a hike is involved, or are in wet, or muddy areas, I wear my all leather Salomon Authentic 6, or Lowa Renegade hiking boots.

 

For city parks, or other 1/1 type caches I wear either my sneakers, or low top Salomon shoes like

these (but the mens model, without the pink colors). They are cool,lightweight, provide great traction and give an amazing amount of support for a low top shoe.

 

For geocaching, you don't really need a lot of boot. A mid-duty all leather boot, or a light, to mid-duty fabric/leather model would be fine. I can't address whether or not the cactus will tear up a fabric/leather boot, but I've used them before and they seem to be very durable. From my experience, the soles wear out before the tops.

 

Some quality boot makers are LL Bean (their Cresta Hikers are a great boot and a good value), Lowa, Rachlie, Salomon, Asolo, Vasque, Merrell, Montrail, Danner, Technica, La Sportiva and Scarpa.

 

For some really good deals on boots, check out Sierra Trading Post. Prices are great and so is service. If they don't fit, just send them back and they'll refund your postage.

 

[This message was edited by BrianSnat on May 09, 2003 at 06:10 AM.]

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After 20+ years in the army, I have a number of pairs of well-broken-in boots. If the cache is a 1/1 or something easy, I will wear walking shoes. But for much more than that, I go with the boots.

 

My favorite boots are the suede desert boots from the first gulf war. They have the Viet-Nam era cleated sole, but no steel shank. Guess they were not expecting punji-sticks in Iraq. But it does have an integral heat shield in the sole. Being Suede, they clean right off with a brush. There are two versions to look for. The earlier ones had a dark brown sole. They are hard and wear well even over sharp rocks. The newer version has a light tan sole, and they wear quickly as they were designed for sand only. It is a softer rubber.

 

My son (Army_Scout) in Iraq says they have a totally NEW style boot now, but I will need to wait till he comes home to see. Soon I hope.

 

Being we are in the desert I avoid BLACK boots for caching/hiking.

 

Good luck in your search.

 

Mike. Desert_Warrior (aka KD9KC).

El Paso, Texas.

 

Citizens of this land may own guns. Not to threaten their neighbors, but to ensure themselves of liberty and freedom.

 

They are not assault weapons anymore... they are HOMELAND DEFENSE WEAPONS!

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I've owned a pair of Rocky boots with Gore-Tex. I bought them without much research, but I've been happy. In the three years that I've worn them quite a bit, they've shown surprisingly little wear.

 

I've visited a couple local outdoors stores in my search for a new pair of outdoor footwear, and the consensus among salesmen seem to be that low-top hiking shoes are the way to go. Both men I talked to said that they have done quite a bit of hiking, and unless they were hiking in some highly technical terrain, they wore low-tops.

 

You can see some of Vasque's lowtops here. I'm a hard sell, and was shocked when they recommended lowtop shoes for hiking... but after a fair bit of research, I think they may be right.

 

It seems the weight savings of wearing shoes is an enormous advantage. Extremely light hiking shoes will allow you to walk further in comfort than nearly any other change in hiking gear will.

 

I'm pretty sure I'm gonna get me a pair in the next week or so.

 

Jamie

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quote:
I've visited a couple local outdoors stores in my search for a new pair of outdoor footwear, and the consensus among salesmen seem to be that low-top hiking shoes are the way to go. Both men I talked to said that they have done quite a bit of hiking, and unless they were hiking in some highly technical terrain, they wore low-tops.

 

That probably depends on where you live. Here in the northeast, you're asking for a turned ankle on many trails if you go with low tops. The trails here tend to be very rocky. The high tops also give your ankles added protection from bumps and scrapes. I'm sure that low tops are fine in the desert and other areas where the terrain is fairly flat.

 

"It has been my experience that folks who have no vices have very few virtues" -Abraham Lincoln

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quote:
Originally posted by BrianSnat:

I wear either my sneakers, or low top Salomon shoes like

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/xq/asp/base_no.60621/str_base_no.60075,60621,60750,60956,61002,61011,61173,61258,61261,61281,61284,61291,61295,61366,61367,61368,61369,61370,61371,61378,/header_title./page_name.prod_list_display.asp/search_type.L2%7E358/size1./size2./gender.0/ShowImages.yes/sq.0/cont.1/sqlSearchStr./intPgNo.1/special_type./qx/product.asp(but the mens model, without the pink colors).

 


 

but brian, pink would look so good on you. and it takes a real man to pull it off successfully.

 

anyway, i think the salesmen want to sell more low tops. i'm prone to turned ankles, so i need the support. i'm even thinking of getting a pair of ankle biters for my bike and running shoes. i only run on trails, so extra support would not be a bad thing. sure beats an aircast.

 

it doesn't matter if you get to camp at one or at six. dinner is still at six.

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I just buy cheap and comfortable hiking boots. Like HiTech. Big 5 always has somthing on sale for about $20.

I can tear up a pair of boots in one summer easy. We have lots of lava formations around here and it seems to attract Geocachers. The dark crevices and holes are great places for caches but real hard on shoes and skin!

 

Did you know that the base of my wine glass fits perfectly into a family size tomato soup can?

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I just looked for my first cache yesterday. But, whenever I go hiking/walking, even on relatively smooth terrain, I wear a pair of Hi-Tec hiking boots I've had for some years. I like the excellent traction and, most important, the ankle support.

 

As finding my first cache involved hiking over some rather large rocks, the boots were much better than sneakers would have been.

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I wear my sneakers as much as I can, (end up getting them muddy pretty often) but when needed wear my NewBalance leather Hiking boots, I have EEEE feet (great for lateral stability) and the NewBalance boots fit better than any others I've tried, are rugged and waterproof.

 

_________________________________________________________

If trees could scream, would we still cut them down?

Well, maybe if they screamed all the time, for no reason.

Click here for my Geocaching pictures and Here (newest)

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It goes against common sense but I can't stand wearing hiking boots or Nikes when I geocache.

 

When I was a kid, I went barefoot a lot (except in school/church). Now I don't feel comfortable in real shoes. When I cache, I wear moccasins, or clogs. Anything else, and my foot feels clumsy like I'm wearing clown shoes.

 

I know the arguments about turned ankles. I've never sprained my ankle in moccasins or clogs, but I've taken nasty falls and hurt myself when I've tried to do the smart thing and worn hiking boots or athletic shoes.

************

 

That moss-covered bucket I hailed as a treasure,

For often at noon, when I returned from the field,

I found it the source of an exquisite pleasure.

 

Samuel Woodworth The Old Oaken Bucket

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BrianSnat says-

(sorry don't know how to quote yet)

 

"I'm sure that low tops are fine in the desert and other areas where the terrain is fairly flat."

 

Au contraire, fellow geocacher...low tops are the LAST things you want out here, unless you like cactus bristles and rocks down inside your boots..OUCH!..I like the fact that the high tops might help out a little on the snake bites, too....

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Hey Tseigi Mike and Desert Viking, I know what you mean about "clown shoes". When I first started caching, I couldn't stand the low tops for the reasons I mentioned in the above post, so I got some good high top hikers...they felt big and clumsy at first, but now I am used to them and they stick to rocks like glue, no slide at all. There is something to be said about "feeling" the land or rocks that you are climbing on, though, and that is something you miss out on with thick soles on hiking boots...

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quote:
Au contraire, fellow geocacher...low tops are the LAST things you want out here, unless you like cactus bristles and rocks down inside your boots..OUCH!..I like the fact that the high tops might help out a little on the snake bites, too....

 

You're most likely right.

 

quote:
When I was a kid, I went barefoot a lot (except in school/church). Now I don't feel comfortable in real shoes. When I cache, I wear moccasins, or clogs. Anything else, and my foot feels clumsy like I'm wearing clown shoes.

 

I'm the opposite of Tsegi Mike, et al. I want support. I spent many youthful summers barefoot, playing on the beach, or neighborhood lawns. But when I'm on the rugged and rocky, or swampy and muddy trails in this area, a good pair of hiking boots is very important to me. The "clown shoes" provide support and protection. I really hate feeling every pebble and rock through my shoes.

 

It's all a matter of preference. While climbing Mt. Marcy in NY, I passed a group of backpackers and one of them was wearing a pair of flip-flops (thongs, or whatever you call them). His hiking boots were hung over the back of his pack.

 

I'm not sure if the boots where giving him blisters, or if he just preferred the flip-flops, but he was carrying a full pack and out for more than a day hike. Granted, he was French Canadian and they are slightly odd.

 

[This message was edited by BrianSnat on May 09, 2003 at 04:57 PM.]

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Outside Magazine just came out with their 2003 annual buyers guide. It has some great information on hiking boots, including an article about "Leather or Not". In fact, it's available online Gear of the Year They cover everything from boots to tents to GPS's.

 

Our opinion on boots? We stick with the all leather. I have an old pair of Timberlands that have held up for years. I'm ready to replace them, but not because they're worn out........because I'm tired of them. Husband has an old pair of all leather Adidas boots and one of our sons has a pair of Rockport hiking boots and another has Nike. We're all happy with them. We've tried the Nylon boots, but they aren't waterproof, and your feet always get wet......even when just walking through wet grass. Some of us have actually walked through shallow creeks in our leather boots, and our feet stay dry. We treat our boots 2 times a year to a good rub down of Sno-Seal All-Season Leather Protection.

 

Children are natural mimics who act like their parents despite every effort to teach them good manners.

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I don't care for snakes so went out and bought me some snake boots. First time out with them on it was a cool morning after looking for awhile found cache saw no snakes. Went back to my truck for lunch and regroup. The weather had warmed up a bit so took the boots off. Went back after a couple more caches on the first one felt something under my foot looked down and I was standing on a snakes tail. I didn't fine the cache. They say he was harmless and wouldn't hurt me. But he could make me hurt myself.

 

Mejas

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For the past almost 4 years I have worn Midweight Coleman Hiking Boots, this past weekend I was hiking out to a cache and got a blister under my left pinkie toe, not from the BOOTS but from the SOCKS. I went out and for 15 bucks each bought 2 pair of womens Lt. Hiker Thorlos with the Coolmax. Oh ..and I bought a pair of lightweight Timberlands that are so light you can barely feel them. icon_smile.gif

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Thorlos are great socks. I've had a pair for about 3 months now and I don't wear anything else while I'm geocaching, especially when I know I'm going to be doing any amount of walking. Definitely recommended.

 

"The best way to accelerate a Macintosh is at 9.8m/sec/sec."

-Marcus Dolengo

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I have an old pair of Vasque Exodus mid's....I havent used them for caching yet, but they are comfy and light.

They are similar to the Fusions...I almost went with the Isis instead, but figured I'd try something shorter.

You can get the Vasques at any Red Wing shoe store. I think Red Wing makes them, or owns the company that does. I also think I remember the salesman telling me that you can take them in and get the soles replaced if they happen to wear out before the shoe. That was one of my concerns was that hiking boot soles seem to wear out very quick.

 

I wear Red Wing Irish Setters (basicly short loggers) as everyday wear (no I'm not a redneck, but I AM a hick! icon_wink.gif). I guess its a hold over from being in the service and wearing boots all the time.

I've been using them while caching/hiking. Mine are waterproof, insulated, steel-toed and steel shanked, 8-inch.

4418.jpg

 

They're actually not that bad, but I have had a couple of times that I've come close to twisting my ankle because of the tall heel.

The standard Vibram soles are hardly worn at all, after 4yrs of use, and these ARE definately replaceable for about $35 when they do wear out.

 

I think Red Wings are the best made boots out there, and that was one reason I went with the Vasques.

 

Art

 

www.yankeetoys.org

www.BudBuilt.com

www.pirate4x4.com

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I love my Skechers. They are comfy, they look cool, and they have huge bottoms on them with great traction. With the soles being oversized, I can cross creeks with them without getting my whole foot wet.

 

"The more I study nature, the more I am amazed at the Creator."

- Louis Pasteur

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I wear a pair of 8" high Rockys with Gortex. These stand up extremely well when I am climbing over rocks, and keep my feet dry when I have to cross that creek that I should have been on the other side of to begin with. The other thing that I really like about my rockys is that they are extremely light unlike many of the hiking boots out there.

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quote:
Originally posted by DustyJacket:

quote:
Originally posted by smithdw:

Thorlos are great socks. I've had a pair for about 3 months now and I don't wear anything else while I'm geocaching.....


 

That must get a bit drafty...... icon_biggrin.gif

 

DustyJacket

Not all those that wander are lost. But in my case... icon_biggrin.gif


 

Ha ha, it gets a little cold in the snow too.... icon_biggrin.gif

 

"The best way to accelerate a Macintosh is at 9.8m/sec/sec."

-Marcus Dolengo

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I love my LL Bean Cresta Hikers. I have the all leather ones and love them. I am on my second pair. I wore them too much icon_smile.gifLLBean Cresta Hikers

 

I also wear Nike ACG running/hiking type of shoe. I think its more for orienteering than "hiking" but I use them instead of my cleats for paintball and for light hikes where I am not worried about getting my feet wet.

 

Best suggestion is to make sure you get them someplace that will help you get fitted right and have a return policy that is in your favor.

 

Nothing worse than have a shoe that bind or pinches your foot and isn't confortable.

 

-Robert

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i -swear- by my redbacks. probably not for everyone, but, comfortable, easy-on-easy-off, durable, stylish enough I can wear them to work, and still keep them on for geocaching. i know that these and blundstones (refered to by fans as 'blunnies') are pretty popular amongst the equestrian crowd (i'm no equestrian, horses scare me! lol) -- but, they've got good taste in nice looking boots that can handle the wear-n-tear.

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Italy's Zamberlain Trekker boots are the best! These are all leather boots with VIBRAM soles. I use them year-round...backpacking, snowshoeing, hiking, and of course, cache hunts that are hikes in hte mountains or even in close to town, if the terrain is going to be rough and off trail...e.g. Bremerton has a couple that fit that mold. I like to seal these boots with waterproof stuff especially made for these boots and that really keeps the leather in good shape and I usually only have to treat once a year or so. With gaitors, these guys are pretty waterproof for a stream crossing.

 

They run 250 or so, but I can wear these guys all day and a friend swears by them as well as his retail position involves a lot of standing.

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I have to throw my support behind Merrell as well. I just bought a pair of REI Monarch II Goretex boots. These are just a rebranded Merrell and they have been amazing. I used these on my 3 day backpacking trip along the AT in Md. Did 45 miles in just over 3 days and didn't have any blister problems at all.

 

I will also recomend that along with boots you look into investing in some quality socks. I learned the hard way about the evils of cotton socks.

 

650619.jpg

 

quote:
Originally posted by W8TVI:

http://img.Groundspeak.com/user/66238_2500.jpg

I like my Merrell Chameleon Ventilator boots.

 

http://www.w8tvi.tk/

http://www.mi-geocaching.org/

http://www.cafepress.com/geox

That torpedo did not self-destruct. You heard it hit the hull. And I....was never here.


 

-------------------------------------

Hope is the destination that we seek.

Love is the road that leads to hope.

Courage is the motor that drives us.

We travel out of darkness into faith.

 

-=The Book Of Counted Sorrows=-

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quote:
Originally posted by crashmore:

I have to throw my support behind Merrell as well. I just bought a pair of REI Monarch II Goretex boots. These are just a rebranded Merrell and they have been amazing. I used these on my 3 day backpacking trip along the AT in Md. Did 45 miles in just over 3 days and didn't have any blister problems at all.

 

I will also recomend that along with boots you look into investing in some quality socks. I learned the hard way about the evils of cotton socks.

 

http://a1072.g.akamai.net/f/1072/2062/1d/gallery.rei.com/regularimages/650619.jpg

 

quote:
Originally posted by W8TVI:

http://img.Groundspeak.com/user/66238_2500.jpg

I like my Merrell Chameleon Ventilator boots.

 

http://www.w8tvi.tk/

http://www.mi-geocaching.org/

http://www.cafepress.com/geox

That torpedo did not self-destruct. You heard it hit the hull. And I....was never here.


 

-------------------------------------

Hope is the destination that we seek.

Love is the road that leads to hope.

Courage is the motor that drives us.

We travel out of darkness into faith.

 

-=The Book Of Counted Sorrows=-


I agree with the advice on socks. That part is every bit as important as the boots! Bad socks equals blisters regardless of the boot.

 

Some like to wear a synthetic liner and a heavier sock, but I've always used just a single thicker sock that wicks the sweat away from your feet...can't remember the brand, but I got it from REI as my boots. Something like Wick-Free. Anyrate, avoid cotton like the plague!!!! Teh socks I use are a combo of synthetics...polypro/some other thing.

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Just tried to wear my old jungle boots.

I dodn't know that your feet grow in 16 years.

 

Guess I am in the market for new high-top boots. The ones I see posted here are around ankle high. Are there any high top hiking boots (recommended by someone who wears them) for a max of $150 ?

 

DustyJacket

Not all those that wander are lost. But in my case... icon_biggrin.gif

 

[This message was edited by DustyJacket on May 22, 2003 at 06:14 PM.]

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quote:
Guess I am in the market for new high-top boots. The ones I see posted here are around ankle high. Are there any high top hiking boots (recommended by someone who wears them) for a max of $150 ?

 

All hiking boots I know of are ankle high. Anything higher is usually considered a hunting boot. Check the Cabelas website for something like that.

 

"Au pays des aveugles, les borgnes sont rois"

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I go caching with an old pair of high top Eccos that I paid big bucks at Nordstroms. But, I had them for a few years now. I have about 3 pairs of these they are the most comfortable boot/shoe I have every owned. I used to have a job where I was stood on my feet all day jump on/off a work truck. These boots are really great..

I keep a trash bag in the back of my jeep and change out from my street shoes. It has worked great so far.

 

http://store.nordstrom.com/product/product_brandboutique.asp?styleid=2765018&boutique=boot_shop_men&category=2376778~2372807~2372829~2375603&Search=True

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