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New Guy Thinks He Understands Bugs


Brianslost

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Hi all. I'm a three day veteran of caching so far and I have logged 7 caches. this stuff is great. I have been reading about travel bugs and I think I understand it but I want to bounce it off you guys so I'll be ready when I find one.

 

When I find a cache that has a bug in it I physically remove the item with the bug attached. I then take it home and go onto the website and enter the numbers on it and tell the story about how and where I found it. I should then place it in the next cache I find. If the bug comes with request such as to have it make it to the west coast, I should try to place it into a cache farther west than where I found it.

 

Reading all the posts about logging and grabbing has me a little confused about what to do with one should I find it. Do I have the right idea?

 

Brianslost

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Yep, that's basically it. You don't have to place it in the very next cache you visit. But it's a good idea not to hold onto them for too long. I've got 5 TB's in my drawer right now. Well, it's more like 3, since two of them are my own... I'm saving them for my trip on Chicago (I live in NC) in two weeks.

 

You can also retrieve a bug from a cache, write down the serial number, place it in another cache, and then go home to enter it.

 

YodaDoe

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I'll ditto that do-not-hold-for-a-long time. I'm guilty of this, in a bad way, with one bug I took. I ended up mailing the poor thing to a helpful gc'r who was able to send it on its way when I was not able to get out caching.

 

Log it after picking up if you don't place it on the same caching outing - this lets the website (& therefore the readers) know that there is no bug to find at the cache you retrieved it from.

 

Also, as Yoda said - write down the number and log it after you've placed it in another cache... This lets the website and cachers know where it is and that it is up for grabs.

 

Hope it helps...

Edited by New England n00b
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You don't neccesarily need to place it in the very next cache you find. Read the bugs goal sheet or look it up online and see what it's goal is.

 

For example, I recently found a bug that is trying to get to Graceland. I was in Northern Colorado and that isn't going to help it reach it's goal if it keeps going north. I brought the bug home and emailed the owner. I let them know that I am going south this weekend so I will be moving it south soon. The owner thanked me for keeping it on the right track and said holding it for a little while is fine. :rolleyes:

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Two scenarios:

 

As a new cacher, all the caches are new to you. Not so for people who have been doing it for a whle. Caches slow down as people find them and then move on.

 

If you go to cache X and you note that the TB has been there a while (say more than 2 weeks), and then you move on to cache Y that is relatively new, drop the TB there. This will get it into the stream of caching activity and will get it its best chance of moving on in a big way. Like being in the back water of a stream versus the main channel.

 

Cache X is new and Cache Y is new. Wait and try to move the TB in a direction that will help it on its way.

 

_______

 

Please develop a habit of moving them quickly. If you start accumulating TB's for a big cache vacaction in some other part of the country, be sure to tell the TB owners what you are up to, so they don't just assume their TB is MIA.

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Welcome to the obsession. It's awesome isn't it?

 

As others have said, you are basically right. But you don't need to place it in the next cache. If it's got specific goals, try to get it into a cache where it's closer to it's goal.

 

Avoid keeping it a long time. If you do plan on keeping it over about a week, drop the owner an e-mail letting him know that it's alright and the bug hasn't gone missing.

 

If for some reason you accidentally keep a TB for a long time, like you find it laying in your trunk 3 months after it was picked up, let the owner know about this and get it back into circulation.

 

I'm convinced that many bugs are lost when an experienced cacher picks it up and loses it somehow. Then when they finally find it, they are too embarassed to log it. I figure it can't be just 1 time cachers taking them, and newbies tend to be very into the "rules" of the game.

 

F_M

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The travel bug "How to" page covers the basics (http://www.geocaching.com/track/howto.aspx).

 

Most things related to TBs are common sense, as you wrote "do unto others". However, people do what they think is the right thing in their minds. Cachers are people, and don't necessarily follow whatever "rules" you might want them to follow. There really can't be too many TB rules because they can't be enforced anyway. If you search the TB thread you'll find many discussions of these things. If you have a specific question, search for the key words or phrase, before posting your question, because it's probably come up before.

 

... and the pinned thread "Snoogans' TB Longevity Clinic" covers many things related to sending bugs.

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As others have stated, the forums are the best way to pick up the rules. You have it, do unto others. You are putting a item out in the world. It will spend it's time by itself in caches. There's no way to enforce any rules, so the only things you can really do are follow Snoogan's Longevity clinic and do what you would like others to do. Maybe there's something to that whole karma thing.

 

F_M

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Yep, that's basically it. You don't have to place it in the very next cache you visit. But it's a good idea not to hold onto them for too long. I've got 5 TB's in my drawer right now. Well, it's more like 3, since two of them are my own... I'm saving them for my trip on Chicago (I live in NC) in two weeks.

 

You can also retrieve a bug from a cache, write down the serial number, place it in another cache, and then go home to enter it.

 

YodaDoe

mabe you could trade one out at this cache Cache site for mine that is in it and take it back to NC.

Edited by Cache Viking
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Okay, new question now that I have that one down. I have set up my account to watch the caches in my area that I have visited so far. This should let me know when a bug arrives. When and if one shows up can I go to the cache with the only purpose of picking up the bug? I don't need to log the cache again which I don't think I can anyway. I assume I should sign the log book and say that I took it. Then I can log it at home and pass it into the next cache I find (or whatever the bug desires). Sound somewhat right?

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Okay, new question now that I have that one down. I have set up my account to watch the caches in my area that I have visited so far. This should let me know when a bug arrives. When and if one shows up can I go to the cache with the only purpose of picking up the bug? I don't need to log the cache again which I don't think I can anyway. I assume I should sign the log book and say that I took it. Then I can log it at home and pass it into the next cache I find (or whatever the bug desires). Sound somewhat right?

Yep! Pick up any travel bug whenever you want from any cache. If it is from a cache you have previosly found it is best to log a NOTE on the cache page to say you picked it up.

 

Remember to log the tb's into the cache you place them into. Use your FIND log to do this or use a NOTE if you place the bug in a cache you've already found. At the bottom of the Cache Log-In page there is a pull down list of all tb's in your possession. Click the one you are dropping off but remember not to roll your scroll wheel before getting out of that box or you might scroll to a different bug and log it in by accident.

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