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r.haus

EBRPD Banning Geocaches?

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I just read the log to a new cache GCHPCT (The Professors Cache) where it is stated that a park ranger told two cachers that all geocaches were to be removed from all East Bay Regional Parks. Does anyone have more info on this. If this is the case this is huge.

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I just came here to post a thread about this, but you beat me to it.

 

Yes, this is a potentially bad situation for the East Bay. That's 3 caches that have been pulled that I'm aware of. The Professor's Cache, Trails Challenge: Hayward Shoreline and Spikey lost Ivy.

 

Here's a copy of an email that was forwarded to me:

[GEO] Hayward Shoreline contacting you from Geocaching.com 

 

This letter is to inform you that the East Bay Regional Park District has asked that all geocaches on its land be removed as a matter of policy.  Even tho your cache has not caused any problems along the Hayward Shoreline, they are to be removed. I have spoke with other Supervisors who have told me of disturbances to historic and cultural structures, fences being cut and sensitive habitat being dug up in the

search for buried caches.  So, I have removed your cache and all others from the Shoreline and have them in the park office. If you wish to retrieve them you can call to make arraingements to pick yours up. 

Mark Taylor

Park Supervisor

Hayward Regional Shoreline

3050 West Winton Ave.  Hayward CA 94545

510-783-1066

Hayward@ebparks.org

I am very concerned about the misinformation in the letter. Its this exact sort of erroneous information that led to the National Parks ban.

 

While I posted the contact info above, I don't know haw effective it will be if a bunch of people go blasting off emails. I think it would be more effective to get together as a group, and have a formal meeting with Mr. Taylor and his colleagues. Perhaps this is a good project for BADGES.

 

This is very disappointing. There are at least 7 new caches in the queue right now in other East Bay Regional parks that I am hesitant to approve until we can get a handle on this.

Edited by Hemlock

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It looks like caches in the Hayward Shoreline of the EBRP are the target. The ranger wants to protect the park from damage that's not happening. This is like making the park Y2K Safe because their fighting an enemy that doesn't exist. It will make the dude look good and maybe promote his career. Since Geocaching never involves "digging up treasure", he's on a witch hunt for political posture. :lol:

 

If any caches are in the Hayward Shoreline of the EBRP, better collect it quickly before the ignorant do gooder beats you to it and makes the park safe once again. [it would be even safer if they just closed it off from all people. Then they'd have ''no impact''.] :lol:

 

This letter is to inform you that the East Bay Regional Park District has asked that all geocaches on its land be removed as a matter of policy.

That policy does not exist. Look for yourself in their own Park Rules and Regulations. The EBRP's Park Advisory Committee doesn't know about this rangers vendetta either. [Witch Hunt.]

Edited by Green Achers

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Well, there's a solution to that - All East Bay Park Caches should be 5-star puzzles! If the rangers want to remove them, they're going to have to at least think very hard before they do. :-)

 

Jeff

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Now I'm not 100% on this but isn't Haward Shoreline a part of HARD (Hayward Area Recreation Department)? This is a completely different agency than East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD)

 

This may be one of those dual agency parks that I'm not aware of but I'm fairly sure The Hayward Shoreline just north of hwy 92 is part of HARD and not EBRPD.

 

Some who live there might want to be sure who this ranger works for before caches start being pulled.

 

Peace!

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Hayward Shoreline is part of the East Bay Regional Park District. They do have a relationship with Hayward Area Parks and Recreation with respect to some of the area (the Interpretive Center, for example) but the park supervisor who removed my cache and the others was on his own turf.

 

It is important that you all know that the park supervisor (Mark Taylor) reports that he was acting under the direction of his supervisior, Steve Jones, and that he was not acting on his own. He did not report any problems with the caches at Hayward Shoreline. He contacted me so that I could come collect my cache from his office, a courtesy I appreciated.

 

I do think that we need to contact the Park District and ask them not to enforce a policy against geocaching before one is written. But we need to be nice about it: current practice has been to leave caches alone unless the cache presents a problem, and we would like them to continue that practice.

 

And then we need to get ourselves involved in the policy-making process so that no policy against geocaching is created.

 

I think it is very important for us to be thoughtful in what we do and how we present ourselves with respect to this issue. We want the Park district to see that we are are positive factor in the parks (the type of people they want there) so we need to act the part even if we disagree with an action someone has taken.

 

East Bay Regional has always supported multiple user groups (hikers, equestrians, dog walkers, bicyclists). Other park districts have taken the easy way out of difficulties by simply banning groups (i.e. "no dogs") that might present problems. I am hopeful that East Bay Regional will continue their positive practices with respect to Geocaching if we work with them.

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:smile: Can someone please take the lead in contacting EBRPD? I will be away for 2 weeks, but I'll be glad to assist in anyway that I can.

 

4wheeler also posted an informative item on this topic including the appropriate contact person: http://forums.Groundspeak.com/GC/index.php?showtopic=65207

 

We need to impress upon them that as a whole, we are careful with protecting the environment, trash out, pay our taxes and annual membership fees, etc. Perhaps we could assist by providing them with some contact names incase there is difficulties with any given caches, offer an approval process, etc. Could a petition help?

 

I want my $30 back! How many of us have mave made the payment for this year?

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I work for the City of San Jose and have some experience with dealing with this sort of thing (my department works with other agencies regarding park, transportation, and other issues, opening service requests and following through). While I would be happy to help, I am not a resident of the east bay and I don't know how much clout I would have with EBRPD. However I'd be happy to give my input or help someone else do this.

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As an interim solution, how about changing all of the caches in EBRPD parks to Member Only caches. That way the park rangers won't be able to get the coords and cache descriptions to locate and/or remove caches unless they become Premium members.

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I want my $30 back! How many of us have mave made the payment for this year?

I just got my renewal letter for my membership. I'm not mailing my renewal in until I find out if geocaches are going to be allowed in EBRPD parks.

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Don't be so sure that the rangers aren't premium members...one in our area is and it has caused some folks a bit of trouble from time to time. For a person who is really out to remove caches, $30 is not all that high a price to pay. :):)

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As an interim solution, how about changing all of the caches in EBRPD parks to Member Only caches.  That way the park rangers won't be able to get the coords and cache descriptions to locate and/or remove caches unless they become Premium members.

Groundspeak, as a matter of policy, grants Premium Membership status to any land manager that asks for it.

 

I really don't appreciate the attitude of treating land managers as the enemy. It's their land! We are the guests! Some people need to wake up to this realization. :)

 

</soapbox>

 

I think it is very important for us to be thoughtful in what we do and how we present ourselves with respect to this issue. We want the Park district to see that we are are positive factor in the parks (the type of people they want there) so we need to act the part even if we disagree with an action someone has taken.
I couldn't have said it better myself.

 

I will help however I can, but I live in Sacramento, so I won't have much clout with them either. I will be happy to talk to them as a cache reviewer, but from what I have heard from other areas, things tend to work out better when we demonstrate that we are a large, family-oriented, positive group that they would want to have in their parks. If we come across as argumentative, sneaky, and disrespectful, then it's very likely that geocaching will be banned completely.

 

Think about it.

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I sent written (not email) letters to the members of the Board of Directors, General Manager, and Park Advisory Committee yesterday. My letters were positive, laying out information such as 1) Caches are not buried and 2) Cachers are nature-loving, non-destructive types. I pointed out that geocaching is a family-oriented activity that is not harmful to the environment and in fact brings more people to the parks and trails of the area. I also asked for more information about the no geocaching policy.

 

I think more letters like this (educational and not argumentative) are what they need to see.

 

Anyone joining me?

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I really don't appreciate the attitude of treating land managers as the enemy. It's their land! We are the guests! Some people need to wake up to this realization.

It is most definitely not their land. it is our land. They have been given the responsibility of managing it (hence the term "land manager") for the greater good.

 

That said, I agree that treating land managers as the enemy is inappropriate. On the other hand, I believe that removing caches first and asking questions later is inappropriate behavior on the part of the land managers.

 

If they were to email me and ask me to remove my caches, I would gladly comply as quickly as I could, or else ask them to remove them for me. However, when they remove my cache and then email me to offer to let me pick it up, I feel my privacy is violated; how do I know that they won't cite me for some made-up "infraction" when I show up to reclaim the cache? So I for one will not go to pick up any caches of mine that are removed without asking me first.

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In an effort to clarify what exactly the policy is with EBRPD I called the office today to speak with the Chief of Parks, Steve Jones. I didn't get past his assistant. I spoke with her for a short while about our concerns and need of clarification. She was completely unfamiliar with geocaching and said Mr. Jones would be calling. I will post a summary of the conversation when and if it happens. If it is true that caches are banned my goal is to set up a face to face meeting with him and a few representatives from the caching community to educate him on what we do and don't do as cachers using the parks.

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Looks like a mission for SoCal geocachers.

Too bad Hayward is across the bay from San Francisco.. I don't think the SoCal'ers will be all that interested.

True but is there any other local org that's close?

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The local org, which is sort of loose, is BADGES. Their next event is April 4. I think the immediate problem is that those most concerned aren't sure what the best thing to do is. sit tight? write letters? send emails? phone? drop by to chat? organize a group meeting? attend one of their public meetings as a group?

 

The developments are of particular import to all bay area cachers - the east bay regional park district has an enormous amount of parkland stretching from the sacramento river down to milpitas, and from the bay east past a line from Mt diablo through livermore. I would venture a guess that from 1/3 to 1/2 of all caches in this area are on EBRPD land. Geocaching is what has connected me to these parks and I for one won't take it's elimination passively.

 

I've started this thread in the main area asking for advice.

Edited by WalruZ

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I just got the official word from Steve Jones, Chief of Parks for EBRPD.

 

"There is no official policy that allows geocaches on EBRPD land."

 

This means caches are not allowed since permission was never received. Existing caches will not be searched out but if found will be removed.

 

This is a small item for the park district to be dealing with at this time. The easiest stance for them to have is "we don't have a policy" so they are not allowed. Mr. Jones recited the same concerns as mentioned in the letter. (looking like bombs, damaging park property, digging up areas, unsafe etc.) I explained briefly that this just wasn't the case and how caches are regulated and in general cachers are do gooders that appreciate the parks. My overall impression is that in the scope of things this issue is too small for the park district to worry about.

 

In my opinion ......

We are not going to change this position through angry calls and letters.

We have to plan and organize an effort to educate and inform the policy makers (This includes not only the board of directors but various operations personnel and future subcommittees) of the EBRPD and then force the issue of making an official policy. Since the current stance does not allow caches we don't have much to lose. My name was given to the person in charge of forming subcommittees but I don't anticipate any calls soon. How do others feel? Is there anyone interested in working with me on influencing this change?

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I just got the official word from Steve Jones, Chief of Parks for EBRPD.

 

"There is no official policy that allows geocaches on EBRPD land."

 

This means caches are not allowed since permission was never received. Existing caches will not be searched out but if found will be removed.

Not having an official policy allowing geocaches does not mean that geocaches aren't allowed. Unless they have a policy (official or otherwise) not allowing geocaches, then I would say that geocaches are allowed, much in the same way that I would assume that playing frisbee is allowed, since they don't say it isn't.

 

--Marky

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I just got the official word from Steve Jones, Chief of Parks for EBRPD.

 

"There is no official policy that allows geocaches on EBRPD land."

This means caches are not allowed since permission was never received.

That also means that there is no official policy that disallows geocaches :huh:

 

Existing caches will not be searched out but if found will be removed.
Not exactly the case on the Hayward Shoreline :huh:

 

My overall impression is that in the scope of things this issue is too small for the park district to worry about.
Nevertheless caches have been removed from the Hayward Shoreline.

 

In my opinion ......

We have to plan and organize an effort to educate and inform the policy makers (This includes not only the board of directors but various operations personnel and future subcommittees) of the EBRPD and then force the issue of making an official policy.

This is probably a good idea. I'd hate to see the ranger from Hayward get transferred to Pleasanton Ridge or Mission Peak :o

 

This seems like a great topic for discussion at the upcoming BADGES dinner.

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Cache In Trash Out Day is April 17.

 

That might be a good day to organize an event cache at an East bay park, get a lot of geocachers involved in a large scale clean up project, invite the park rangers to see what kind of people we really are, and build a lot of good will.

 

What does everyone think?

Edited by mjp303

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I think the issue is one of permission more than of use. Since permission to place the caches was never received they are not allowed. I would be more than willing to take the stance of " If it is legal and not regulated by a policy than it should be okay" but I think that is sidesteping the real issue. Obviously, as Hemlock pointed out in the post above (and contrary to my earlier post) this is an "issue" with EBRPD or else the caches would not have been removed. Right now I think the answer to the question of whether or not caches are allowed needs to be answered by Hemlock. Are new caches on EBRPD land going to be approved?

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Being that the East Bay is my stomping grounds, I'd like to help out R.haus, Hemlock, and other area cachers with their efforts. Hopefully I can find the time in my busy schedule... but if I were really THAT busy, then I would never be caching! :huh: Feel free to contact me via email (or via my profile).

 

I think mjp303's idea is a great one! I'm attending a class the morning of Sat 4/17, but I'd definitely be up for a CITO event in the afternoon. Short of being the event organizer, let me know what else I can do.

 

Hope to participate in the discussion further at the BADGES dinner in Pleasanton...

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I think the issue is one of permission more than of use.  Since permission to place the caches was never received they are not allowed.

As I said above, do I need permission to play frisbee in an EBRPD park? I don't think they have an official policy stating that playing frisbee is allowed. Unless I am told that an activity is not allowed (assuming that the activity is legal), I'm going to assume that it is. If I didn't, I wouldn't be able to do much of anything in a park. Have you ever had a picnic in a park? Did you check first to see if it was okay? Do they have an official policy on picnics and frisbees? If not, should I not play frisbee or have picnics? Just because permission isn't explicitly granted doesn't mean that an activity is prohibited.

 

--Marky

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I think the issue is one of permission more than of use.  Since permission to place the caches was never received they are not allowed.

As I said above, do I need permission to play frisbee in an EBRPD park? I don't think they have an official policy stating that playing frisbee is allowed. Unless I am told that an activity is not allowed (assuming that the activity is legal), I'm going to assume that it is. If I didn't, I wouldn't be able to do much of anything in a park. Have you ever had a picnic in a park? Did you check first to see if it was okay? Do they have an official policy on picnics and frisbees? If not, should I not play frisbee or have picnics? Just because permission isn't explicitly granted doesn't mean that an activity is prohibited.

 

--Marky

Most Park and Rec facilities DO have blanket policies that allow activities like picnics and Frisbee playing. The issue isn't whether you can justify geocaching in EBRP because of a lack of policy, but rather how will EBRP act in regards to geocaching right now. If they (or even just one renegade employee) are going to react by removing our caches, then your justification is not enough.

 

I think the idea for an EBRP CITO event is great. I also agree that we need to for a committee to look into this matter. r.haus has a gotten a good lead, and we should attempt to follow it further. A nice power point presentation and other positive displays of why EBRP should allow geocaching can get us far. I have confidence that this matter will end successfully with this kind of plan of action.

 

We should look into planning a meeting or attending a City Hall board meeting to present our issue.

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WalruZ pointed out the EBRPD's public meetings which would be a great place to start. I have no experience with these sorts of things, but hopefully one of you does, and we can put together a presentation to make at one of the upcoming meetings.

 

I just ran across the October 2001 edition of The Trailhead, which is the Newsletter of the East Bay Regional Park District Police Department Volunteer Organizations. There is an article about geocaching on page 6, and I quote the last paragraph:

In spite of damage to the landscape that many of us have noted in the regional parklands, the District's Ordinance 38 does not prohibit walking off trail, walking on a visitor-created ("bootleg") trail, or even "cutting" trail switchbacks or creating new "bootleg" trails while on foot except in areas posted "closed" or to the extent that plants or geological or archaeological features are damaged. If a patroller believes that a geocache is becoming a problem, however, he or she should confer with the park's supervisor.

Of course that article is 2 1/3 years old, but I just checked Ordinance 38 and the info in the article still holds true. Even littering is so narrowly defined that it can't be applied to geocaching :huh:

 

That said, there is still obviously an issue otherwise caches would not have been actively removed from the Hayward Shoreline. Whether that was the act of a renegade ranger or a misguided order from above, remains to be seen.

 

At this time I no longer see a reason for not approving caches on EBRPD land and will be approving the 10 or so that are on hold in the next day or two, after conferring with the hiders.

 

However this does not mean we should not pursue this. This is the second time that caches have been removed by EBRPD (the first being about 1.5 years ago) and if we do nothing, it will no doubt happen again.

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Most Park and Rec facilities DO have blanket policies that allow activities like picnics and Frisbee playing. The issue isn't whether you can justify geocaching in EBRP because of a lack of policy, but rather how will EBRP act in regards to geocaching right now. If they (or even just one renegade employee) are going to react by removing our caches, then your justification is not enough.

There is no doubt that there are issues that need addressing. I'm just trying to point out that we haven't done anything wrong or broken any written rules and have just as much right to use these multi-use lands as the next person. I definitely think we need to enlighten the park supervisors to the benefits of geocaching, and to dispell some of the myths that they seem to entertain.

 

--Marky

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We've been out of the area for a while - moved to Portland and adopted out our "Pinole Cat" cache just over a year ago - but I just wanted to note that apparantly it and the other cache in Richmond's Point Pinole Regional Shoreline (part of EBRPD) have been removed today. From the posted note, it sounds like word came from higher-up:

 

"Cache has been removed by the park ranger under orders from his boss. He has the cache in his office if anyone wants it."

 

Anyway, just thought I'd add those data points; the Point Pinole caches are not the most popular and so probably on most local cachers' radar, but I like to think they introduced many folks to the park who otherwise wouldn't have thought to venture up to Richmond... :D

 

--Alison

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Well, that sounds like the rangers are taking a VERY active role in the removal of caches and now it is not just isolated to Hayward Shorline. I really don't think these are just being happened upon. Very sad, and apparently not what is officially supposed to take place.

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I re-enabled my caches in EBRP today. I have resigned myself to abandoning them if they are removed. It just doesn't seem fair to deprive cachers of a chance to get them while it is still possible.

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What a nightmare. I will call the Chief of Parks again next week and be a little less nice as he has outright lied to us. I was doing some web searches on ebrpd and of groups attempting to influence policy. It appears that it is something that just doesn't happen unless it comes from inside. One group BTCEB (Bicycle Trails Council of the East Bay) has been trying for fifteen years. (http://www.btceb.org/index.htm) They wrote letters, attended meetings, presented data of what other parks are successfully doing, actively volunteer in the parks and it seems as if they have gotten almost nowhere in terms of influencing policy. Uggh.

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I don't think it is as bad as you may think; EBRPD is the most reasonable parks authority I have ever dealt with. I belong to a swimming group called SOWAT (for Shadow Cliffs Open Water Aquatics Team). EBRPD allows us to swim across and around Shadow Cliffs, subject to some relatively simple rules about insurance, testing, and times. Most parks departments would reject such an idea outright, citing liability problems, etc.

 

So I don't think that the situation is hopeless by any means; we just have to figure out a way to keep the parks people from having to do more work. As a result, I would (actually, I will when I get back from my current trip) propose that we provide a permitting process for geocaches; that way, the appropriateness of geocache placements in the parks can be assured without giving them any additional workload.

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something i would like to add in terms of influencing the ebrpd - they are under the gun themselves to keep from losing money in our new terminator-run government. They recently went to a good bit of trouble to put together a report that justifies their existence and positions them as an important part of the Quality of Life in the East Bay -- something, btw, that I fully agree with and support.

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Haven't we as a society decided that if something is not expressly written as illegal it is deemed legal. If the park wishes to have no policy about geocaches, then it is inherently legal to place caches on EBRPD managed lands.

 

If they are concerned about damage caused by geocachers, why do they turn a blind eye to the damage caused by their liberal use of cattle? Money maybe?

 

Just my 2 cents, having at one time worked for the district. Sunol, the little known diamond in the rough of this district.

 

Peace!

Edited by wildlifeguy

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It's their land! We are the guests! Some people need to wake up to this realization. :D

If it's theirs, better show me the deed.:D This is a rather common myth. However if I'm not mistaking, we paid for that land and the management there of, via taxes. We have the right to use the land providing we obey the laws and rules. We also have the right to request those rules be changed (or in this case establish).

 

It is most definitely not their land. it is our land. They have been given the responsibility of managing it (hence the term "land manager") for the greater good.

Fizzy hit the nail on the head here. If you don't know your rights, you'll surely (and likely, freely) give them away. Stand up for what's right and make a difference. :D

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Haven't we as a society decided that if something is not expressly written as illegal it is deemed legal. If the park wishes to have no policy about geocaches, then it is inherently legal to place caches on EBRPD managed lands.

This is what I've been trying to express, but you have stated it much clearer. Thanks!

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Last week, rangers removed the 'Dynamite Beach' and 'Pinole Cat' Geocaches from Point Pinole Regional Park. Today, Tadcoolr and I went to the park to retrieve our caches. We spoke to some very polite employees. They said it is EBRPD policy to remove geocaches that they know about, but they are not searching for them. They returned our caches to us, and asked that we contact the Point Pinole Park Manager for more information.

 

It was evident from our conversation that there are people in the park district who feel that caches should be allowed, and that Geocaching and Geocachers are actually very beneficial to the parks. We must talk to the policy makers and show them the benefits that geocaching brings to the parks.

 

I will post another note after we have spoken to the Park Manager.

 

Paul

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I will post another note after we have spoken to the Park Manager.

Please do! We are all interested in hearing anything about this issue.

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I have spoke with other Supervisors who have told me of disturbances to historic and cultural structures, fences being cut and sensitive habitat being dug up in the search for buried caches.

 

People who disturb structures, cut fences, or dig sensitve habitat are not geocaching. They are vandalizing. :) These things are not part of geocaching. Geocachers do not condone these behaviors.

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I have spoke with other Supervisors who have told me of disturbances to historic and cultural structures, fences being cut and sensitive habitat being dug up in the search for buried caches.

 

People who disturb structures, cut fences, or dig sensitve habitat are not geocaching. They are vandalizing. :rolleyes: These things are not part of geocaching. Geocachers do not condone these behaviors.

Actually, doing any of these dirty deeds indicates you'll never find the cache you're searching for. If you have to break the Geocaching Rules (or Standards) to hunt a cache... it's not where you're looking.

 

While I'm sure no cacher has ever cut a fence nor brought out the old backhoe in their pursuit, the perception this guy has is that we do this and more. Slapping him awake would be frowned upon so maybe we should just offer a day of Geocaching. That way he can go along and witness (even photograph) the impact. Afterwards, he could be taken out to one of the EBRParks with cattle where he can document really significant impact. Afterwards, a good honest game of Ultimate Frisbee (which would have to be played in a park that states that game is allowed).

''Buried caches''? Better remind these guys to leave their shovels, chain saws, bolt cutters and soccer cleats in the office. We're going Geocaching! Who wants to go??

Edited by Green Achers

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I wonder if geocachers are targets for the simple reason that we are fairly, well...visible is the only word I can come up with at the moment. Other park users are anonymous, whereas we leave our names for all to see, both in the physical logs and online. That makes it look like we're the ones abusing the parks. And even if we aren't, they can at least identify us as possible culprits.

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Thoughts on the prospect of EBRPD banning caches:

 

1) It would be really, really sucky if such a ban were to be put in place. I think I am not alone in that caching is what has brought me to many EBRPD parks I would not normally visit. It's a great, healthy activity, and the people who do it are environmentally conscious and enjoy the outdoors. They are a part of the EBRPD constituency, and we should work together to help each other.

 

2) We should work with EBRPD to come up with a reasonable policy. I work in government, and I can tell you that, both diplomatically and legally, the "this is my land because I pay taxes so leave me alone" argument doesn't work. In fact, public land does not belong to you, like your car, or to me, like my socks--it belongs to everybody simultaneously. It is, in fact, not yours, in the way most people think of possessing something, so ditch that line--it's a loser. We elect a Board of Directors to oversee the management of the park system. They set policies--we follow them. It's that simple. Remember: if government didn't intervene to save all these areas in the first place, the hills would be filled with subdivisions.

 

3) The EBRPD would have to have a policy permitting geocaches to be placed in parks. Although we know how extremely special and valuable caches are, to the overwhelming majority of the unitiated, caches look like containers hidden in nature--in other words: trash! EBRPD has a blanket no littering policy that I think they could use here without much trouble.

 

4) I am willing to be part of a group that works with EBRPD to set a clear policy. i think a policy is needed, and it's the right and responsibility of the Parks District to review the need for one, and to implement one if necessary. I will tell you that if we do not get involved, a policy will be made anyway, without our input. This is even more likely to happen if isolated individuals start contacting District staff and Directors alerting them to something they probably had no idea about before then. I emailed r.haus, who seems to be taking a lead on this, to offer my participation. Anyone will do, but I will not myself lead the effort--I have too much on my plate. I know some folks at the Park District and work for an Oakland City Councilmember, so I may have some, um, cache, as it were.

 

5) The Cache In Trash Out Event in an EBRPD park is a fantastic idea. All of the Board Directors, all of the EBRPD Foundation Board Members and all Senior Park Management staff should be invited to participate.

 

Just a few thoughts....

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Just to recap who's specifically mentioned wanting to help on this:

 

r.haus

TeamAlamo

beckerbuns

Hemlock

BpSnake

woof

JHorner&Alemley

 

Seven people is a good group. Believe me, I work in City government--an organized group of seven people is more than enough to get the attention of the District. A meeting with the General Manager should be no means be out of the question.

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Seven people is a good group. Believe me, I work in City government--an organized group of seven people is more than enough to get the attention of the District. A meeting with the General Manager should be no means be out of the question.

I work in city government too (specifically the City of San Jose) and I think that we have a good background to come from in terms of helping to deal with EBRPD. I look forward to helping to work this out, however I am needed.

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