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Pictures - Cool Cache Containers (CCC's)


AmishHacker
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Here is a cache that I put in the south Kansas City, MO area. It is in a urban setting, but still secluded enough to have fun finding it.

 

One of the best parts is that I can see the cache from the windows in the back of my house and we have fun watching people look for it.

 

So, this is a multi-cache...where is Stage 1?

cache1.jpg

 

Getting closer, but there's more to than meets the eye.

cache2.jpg

 

You have to slide the orange tape up and it reveals the Stage 2 coordinates.

cache3.jpg

 

I think it's fun.

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Please... (and I apologize ahead of time for those that are selling them) don't buy your caches. Be original. Come up with your own ideas. There are some very nice commercial caches, ready to hide, but anybody with any experience is going to go "ho-hum" when they find it. You can't buy creativity, and creativity is one of the things that seems to be highly valued by finders. Found a fake rock the other day... had a geocaching.com logo stamped into it. "Ho-Hum". Do it yourself, or don't do it. Just my opinion, but it has worked for me.

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Please... (and I apologize ahead of time for those that are selling them) don't buy your caches. Be original. Come up with your own ideas. There are some very nice commercial caches, ready to hide, but anybody with any experience is going to go "ho-hum" when they find it. You can't buy creativity, and creativity is one of the things that seems to be highly valued by finders. Found a fake rock the other day... had a geocaching.com logo stamped into it. "Ho-Hum". Do it yourself, or don't do it. Just my opinion, but it has worked for me.

This advice doesn't work for everybody. Which would you prefer, a purchased cache that some people have seen before, but is rare in the area, or a soon-to-be-soggy piece of gladware?

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Please don't buy your caches.

Whilst I always applaud individual creativity, there are occasions when someone simply doesn't possess the tools or the skills to fabricate specific containers. For instance, I'd like to one day hide one of those nuts/bolts that are drilled out, but I don't own a drill press, or even a vise. I don't think I could make one of those. Without the folks out there selling them, my chances of hiding one of those is drastically reduced. I also admire the fake acorn. (made from latex? maybe?) I have no clue how to make one of those, and if I wanted to hide one, I'd need to buy it.

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Please... (and I apologize ahead of time for those that are selling them) don't buy your caches. Be original. Come up with your own ideas. There are some very nice commercial caches, ready to hide, but anybody with any experience is going to go "ho-hum" when they find it. You can't buy creativity, and creativity is one of the things that seems to be highly valued by finders. Found a fake rock the other day... had a geocaching.com logo stamped into it. "Ho-Hum". Do it yourself, or don't do it. Just my opinion, but it has worked for me.

This advice doesn't work for everybody. Which would you prefer, a purchased cache that some people have seen before, but is rare in the area, or a soon-to-be-soggy piece of gladware?

 

Those are my only choices? Gee... such a dilemna!

 

Yeah, I know that you eBay prebuilt caches, and I figured you'd sound off. My opinion stands, my friend.

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Please don't buy your caches.

Whilst I always applaud individual creativity, there are occasions when someone simply doesn't possess the tools or the skills to fabricate specific containers. For instance, I'd like to one day hide one of those nuts/bolts that are drilled out, but I don't own a drill press, or even a vise. I don't think I could make one of those. Without the folks out there selling them, my chances of hiding one of those is drastically reduced. I also admire the fake acorn. (made from latex? maybe?) I have no clue how to make one of those, and if I wanted to hide one, I'd need to buy it.

 

Well, I don't know about you, but I get my good feelings in part by comments about my creativity. It wouldn't mean very much to me to get those comments if I knew that it was cash, not creativity, that put those caches out there. That's kudos to someone else, not to me.

 

Actually, I just bought my first drillpress last month, and it was not that expensive. I had a vise already. But you may not even have a workshop to use them in, and what's "affordable" to one can be "budget busting" or even impossible to another. My answer to that is that creativity costs nothing. Use what you've got, and try to come up with original ideas. A large part of creativity IS figuring out how to work within your boundaries.

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Well, I don't know about you, but I get my good feelings in part by comments about my creativity. It wouldn't mean very much to me to get those comments if I knew that it was cash, not creativity, that put those caches out there. That's kudos to someone else, not to me.

 

I agree, gettings positive reactions on your creativity is what it's all about !

Finding a creative cache container (or waypoint) is always a pleasure, but sadly it is more the exception than the rule here in Belgium.I for one am a huge fan of this topic and try to make my cache special every time.

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I thought for sure there would be lots of cache containers to post that are not the usual Tins, Ammo Cans, etc.

 

I actually had a log just like this that I cut with a handsaw. Threw the log into a pile of deadwood that had been in its spot for years behind the local zoo. Within a week, the parks and rec dept. decided to clean-out the dead wood pile. There goes all that hard work!

Edited by tenacityj
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176932_2000.JPG

 

176932_1800.JPG

 

176932_1900.JPG

 

A cache I put out around the end of Dec. the channel for the canister was cut in with a chainsaw.

 

I actually had a log just like this that I cut with a handsaw. Threw the log into a pile of deadwood that had been in its spot for years behind the local zoo. Within a week, the parks and rec dept. decided to clean-out the dead wood pile. There goes all that hard work!

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Use what you've got, and try to come up with original ideas.

I do. I have. I will. My retort was not inner directed. I was simply pointing out that, just because someone buys a cache instead of builds a cache, is no reason to get huffy and look down our noses at them. (unless you're into the whole, judgmental, "I'm better than you" thing) I recently found one of those drilled out bolt caches on a guardrail way the heck out in the middle of the woods. The cache was hidden by an elderly but spry woman who has gobs of creativity. Sure, she could've plopped out a film canister here, which would've fit your "Use What You've Got" directive, but I think the bolt increased the challenge considerably. Did she buy it, or did she fire up her machine shop and build it? I have no idea, nor do I care enough to ask. The cache was a lot of fun, which is all that matters to me.

 

Label me: Unwilling to Judge

(except for film canisters) :blink::)

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We recycle :lol:

 

And try to make ones that are interesting and fit into their environment when possible - course we have only placed a couple caches being newbies. We're not on a roll but it just happend. For some unknown reason I like to make them up and have made about a half dozen different types. Someday I'll put them out perhaps.

 

Here's one not in the wild yet.

3a95ef8c-7904-4e6d-9453-2210001597c9.jpg

 

Here's one that is - can you guess what it was before it was put to better use than the recycle bin?

3a1c329c-a660-45c7-ac48-169e2f94cb5c.jpg

Sorry here it is after you grab it (darn leaves make it hard to take pictures) it's got a few big Oaks over it so leaves are a constant problem) you might say it's one of them caches that take on a new aspect once in the wild - nature takes care of it.

b6749b41-8b65-416e-b45f-85f3af16bc5d.jpg

 

This ammocan - pretty standard - needs a good spot one day.

97c77be4-971a-4c3f-8c18-dfb293171789.jpg

 

The Mrs Flatouts requested I post these she finds this thread one of the most interesting ones on here, so do I :D

 

Working on some Micros although I'm not a component of them as they don't hold TB's or trade items, they do have there place and can be quite fun. I figure I might do a couple and make them well, different and this thread and a few finds have got my evil side going pretty darn good. I don't have pics yet and some work still needs to be done. Even so I don't think posting them would be a good idea as it may spoil the fun later. But imagine looking for critters that look real only they have a log where the sun don't shine unlike their real cousins. No not a snake or rodent or anything gross, well Okay one is pretty gross, enough said.

Edited by Flatouts
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Can someone Markwell or PM me a link to the picture of the ammo can stuffed under the lamp post skirt that was posted a while back? Danged if I can find it and I thought that was a darned spiffy cache container. Thanks :laughing:

I believe you were thinking of the picture taken by the Ventura Kids. Its on their profile page:

http://www.geocaching.com/profile/?guid=a0...55-93db6617f727

 

f52f4ce6-8c9d-407a-ae05-79a6a566e86e.jpg

 

:o

 

That's hilarious!

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Here's my contribution. This is the under-side of a rubber spider from the dollar store. I epoxied the cache container inside the body.

 

Spider2.jpg

 

Here's a shot of it out in the woods, in it's little hidey hole. I covered it with a flat piece of bark. Almost mean!

 

Spider3.jpg

 

And by the way, the cache is named Sugar and Spice!

Edited by Tonka_Boy
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Haven't tried this yet, but had an idea- how about a fake geocache? Like have a lock-and-lock or tupperware container (something cheap), labeled as an official geocache, but with the lid glued to the top. The actual log will be either in a nano container or under a piece of tape inconspiciously attached to the bottom.

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Haven't tried this yet, but had an idea- how about a fake geocache? Like have a lock-and-lock or tupperware container (something cheap), labeled as an official geocache, but with the lid glued to the top. The actual log will be either in a nano container or under a piece of tape inconspiciously attached to the bottom.

That's actually been done.

I know of one where the pencil, in the log bag was the actual cache.

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Here are a few caches that have been place in Oklahoma or used at evens. :o:lol::huh::laughing:

 

;)

 

Those are very clever! I especially liked the ammo can "wagon." How does one retrieve the lamp "bulb" cache?

 

Thats the fun part. Can't give that away. So far every one that has done it just loves it. Have not had a bad log yet! :anibad:

If you like the wagon you will like the one I just finish and a video that shows how most of it was built.

We built it and give it to a friend in another town ! :o

Nothing like a cool can !! :o

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Time to put my 2-cents in here and stop worrying about giving hides away as I hope the things I post are helpful in churning up the creative juices. This one I was pretty proud of and it's currently in the wild. Was looking at a preserve and found something that had potential, and by hand I made room for a full size Lock-n-Lock....

 

log1.jpg

 

The raw state and how it looks in the wild (but it's in an area where it fits right in. This picture was in my yard).

 

log2.jpg

 

Then a little elbow grease and a sharp chisel to the bottom.

 

log3.jpg

 

And you end up with room for a full sized cache in my first 40-pound Lock-N-Lock. And hauling this camo to it's final resting spot wasn't the easiest of tasks, too. Didn't fit well in my pack :anicute:

Edited by infiniteMPG
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Time to put my 2-cents in here and stop worrying about giving hides away as I hope the things I post are helpful in churning up the creative juices. This one I was pretty proud of and it's currently in the wild. Was looking at a preserve and found something that had potential, and by hand I made room for a full size Lock-n-Lock....

 

log1.jpg

 

The raw state and how it looks in the wild (but it's in an area where it fits right in. This picture was in my yard).

 

log2.jpg

 

Then a little elbow grease and a sharp chisel to the bottom.

 

log3.jpg

 

And you end up with room for a full sized cache in my first 40-pound Lock-N-Lock. And hauling this camo to it's final resting spot wasn't the easiest of tasks, too. Didn't fit well in my pack :rolleyes:

 

That is WAY COOL! Thanks for sharing! :blink:

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Time to put my 2-cents in here and stop worrying about giving hides away as I hope the things I post are helpful in churning up the creative juices. This one I was pretty proud of and it's currently in the wild. Was looking at a preserve and found something that had potential, and by hand I made room for a full size Lock-n-Lock....

 

log1.jpg

 

The raw state and how it looks in the wild (but it's in an area where it fits right in. This picture was in my yard).

 

log2.jpg

 

Then a little elbow grease and a sharp chisel to the bottom.

 

log3.jpg

 

And you end up with room for a full sized cache in my first 40-pound Lock-N-Lock. And hauling this camo to it's final resting spot wasn't the easiest of tasks, too. Didn't fit well in my pack :rolleyes:

 

Nice, I like the fact that it is the base of a tree with the roots showing. But I bet the tools you used gave you a workout :blink:

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Here's a few that I have.  One of 'em is out in the field but I wan't say which.  Locals, pretend you didn't read this.

  X

See if you can guess what I do for a living without checking my profile.

  X

This last one is my idea for a multi.  A lag bolt into a post will hold one of these for ages!

Sorry for the red Xs. I just pulled the files down because I put those caches out in the field today. Kind of a fine line between sharing ideas and giving them away. I'll gladly email images to non-San Diegans.

 

PM SENT!

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Here's a few that I have. One of 'em is out in the field but I wan't say which. Locals, pretend you didn't read this.

X

See if you can guess what I do for a living without checking my profile.

X

This last one is my idea for a multi. A lag bolt into a post will hold one of these for ages!

Sorry for the red Xs. I just pulled the files down because I put those caches out in the field today. Kind of a fine line between sharing ideas and giving them away. I'll gladly email images to non-San Diegans.

 

PM SENT!

uuuhhhh ok :rolleyes:

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Time to put my 2-cents in here and stop worrying about giving hides away as I hope the things I post are helpful in churning up the creative juices. This one I was pretty proud of and it's currently in the wild. Was looking at a preserve and found something that had potential, and by hand I made room for a full size Lock-n-Lock....

 

log1.jpg

 

The raw state and how it looks in the wild (but it's in an area where it fits right in. This picture was in my yard).

 

log2.jpg

 

Then a little elbow grease and a sharp chisel to the bottom.

 

log3.jpg

 

And you end up with room for a full sized cache in my first 40-pound Lock-N-Lock. And hauling this camo to it's final resting spot wasn't the easiest of tasks, too. Didn't fit well in my pack :rolleyes:

 

Nice, I like the fact that it is the base of a tree with the roots showing. But I bet the tools you used gave you a workout :blink:

 

 

Very cool hide ! Keep up the good work !!

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This is one I am quite prowd of.I call it "the drain".

The parts:

1.JPG

Assembled:

2.JPG

Implemented:

3.JPG

 

4.JPG

 

5.JPG

This is all in relation to the size of my bathtub:

6.JPG

 

From the Groundpeak guidelines: "Caches that are buried. If a shovel, trowel or other “pointy” object is used to dig, whether in order to hide or to find the cache, then it is not appropriate."

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From the Groundpeak guidelines: "Caches that are buried. If a shovel, trowel or other “pointy” object is used to dig, whether in order to hide or to find the cache, then it is not appropriate."

I reckon the geocaching world should be thankful that the pipe is not a "pointy" thing, else it might have violated this guideline.

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Very cool hide ! Keep up the good work !!
Thanks! Carved out the opening by hand... was a lot of work but worth it. One of the first people to find it wrote and said they couldn't find it so they sat down to think about where a full sized cache might be and actually found themselves sitting ON the camo stump without realizing it. I like reading stuff like that :rolleyes:
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Very cool hide ! Keep up the good work !!
Thanks! Carved out the opening by hand... was a lot of work but worth it. One of the first people to find it wrote and said they couldn't find it so they sat down to think about where a full sized cache might be and actually found themselves sitting ON the camo stump without realizing it. I like reading stuff like that :blink:

 

AHA! Secrets revealed! *stalks south to infiniteMPG's cache* Even though I wouldn't know which cache this belongs to - I'd probably be one of the ones that sat on it without realizing it :rolleyes:

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Okay, getting a little less worried about posting camo jobs here so I'm going to pass some more along (and I have quite a few documented). There was a cache that got destroyed from construction but the 'reason' for the cache site was still there. Didn't want to give up the location so went camo instead. Surrounding one part of the area was some old concrete blocks on the ground, most of them filled with sand and debris. Been there for many, many years (and hopefully remain there for many more). With local plants growing near them all. Looks like this :

 

block01.jpg

 

As you can see, most all of the openings are filled with sand while others are filled with leafs and other clutter. Blocks have been there a while. The one opening on the right side is filled with sand with a plastic bottle lid sticking up out of it. If you snag the plastic bottle lid and pull up, this is what you get :

 

block02.jpg

 

A nice little Lock-N-Lock tucked away inside. The lid is actually has a piece of plywood attached that is covered with Quick-crete and dipped in sand with a part of a plastic bottle cap wood screwed on to make sort of a handle. Made to fit snug in the block opening.

 

Fun times!

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