Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Insp Gadget

Is This A Good Radio?

Recommended Posts

OK, I know I'm jumping the gun here, considering that I haven't even received my license yet, but it gives me a goal to shoot for. LOL I'm looking for a handherld radio that I can use while hiking / Geocaching. I wonder what you guys think about the Yaesu VX-150? ( http://radioworld.ca/ham/yaesu/yaesuhh.php#vx150) and is $179 Canadian a good price for this unit?

Share this post


Link to post

Yes it's good see Eham.net reviews but I'd go for a twin band handheld vx5r ,thG71 ect.

 

Leemann

ac7kt

Edited by Leemann

Share this post


Link to post
I wonder what you guys think about the Yaesu VX-150?

Yes, it's a good rig (so I've heard). If you live in a dense area you might consider to dual bander. If you're more in the country then you might want to stick to the 2 meter rig as there probably isn't that much activity on 440.

Share this post


Link to post
Yes it's good see Eham.net reviews but I'd go for a twin band handheld vx5r ,thG71 ect.

 

Leemann

ac7kt

Why would I want or need a dual bander?

Share this post


Link to post

When you get your license, you'll find many more uses for your radio than just hiking/geocaching. Unless there is NO activity on the 440 band in your area, you will want a dual bander eventually. You can listen to them on a scanner or talk to your local hams and get some advice there. It was strongly advised when I got my license almost a year ago now.

 

spiderteam KD7UEC

Share this post


Link to post
When you get your license, you'll find many more uses for your radio than just hiking/geocaching. Unless there is NO activity on the 440 band in your area, you will want a dual bander eventually. You can listen to them on a scanner or talk to your local hams and get some advice there. It was strongly advised when I got my license almost a year ago now.

 

spiderteam KD7UEC

What is the purpose of a dual bander? What does it do?

Share this post


Link to post
What is the purpose of a dual bander? What does it do?

A dual band radio, or multi band radio, can transmit on more than one ham band.

 

I don't know how familiar you are with the band structure. At the risk of stating the obvious, here is a very brief overview:

 

All hams, including those with a no-code Technician license, have priviledges on a number of frequency bands.

 

These are the popular VHF and UHF bands:

 

6 Meters, 50 to 54 MHZ--which has some interesting distance characteristics from time to time and a small amount of use on FM using hand-held radios.

 

2 Meters, 144 to 148 MHz--by far the most popular band. The FM segments are very busy in some areas. Very popular for repeaters, which can extend the range of portable and hand-held radios to wide areas.

 

220 (1-1/4 Meters), 222 to 225 MHz. Similar to the uses for 2-Meters, but not as popular.

 

440 (70 cM), 420 to 450 MHz (with FM voice very popular in the 440 to 450 MHz segment. Second most popular band for hand-helds, also has sub-bands for amateur television, telecommand, and other cool stuff.

 

900, 902 to 928 MHz. A less popular band, with not a lot of equipment available.

 

1.2GHz, 1240 to 1320 MHz. Has some voice activity, but generally not very well used for portable ops.

 

There are a number of higher bands, but their popularity is rather low, except for hams into specialized modes.

 

The VX-150 can transmit only on the 2-meter ham band.

 

The VX-5R can also transmit on the 6-meter and 70-cM. This is a three band radio in a package somewhat smaller than the VX-150.

 

Many hand held transceivers can also receive on multiple ham bands, and other radio service bands, that they can't transmit on.

 

The more bands you have, the more you may be able to use the radio. The band or bands you regularly use will depend on who you talk to. In most areas 2-meter FM is very widely used--in fact there is no more popular band. Many areas have significant traffic on other bands, and many clubs will have repeaters on multiple bands.

 

Dave_W6DPS

Edited by Dave_W6DPS

Share this post


Link to post

I too strongly recommend a dual-band or multi-band handheld.

 

I also strongly recommend the ICOM IC-W32A. It is a very popular radio. At one point, ICOM discontinued it, but brought it back by popular demand. They can be had for under $250 new. Without making this a long post, I will direct you to the following links for your study.

 

What do you use - pt I

 

What do you use - pt II

 

What do you use - pt III

 

While reading all this, notice how I now get over 30 hours of handheld operation AND more ERP that the stock radio, plus can control this radio from the microphone. For hiking and caching, this is a hard system to beat. One of my objectives was to standardize my batteries. By using the BP-170, I accomplished that!

 

Good luck on your choice. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post

A dual bander will transmit on two different bands. Most commonly, the ever popular VHF 2 meter band (144-148 MHz) and the UHF 70 centimeter band (430-450 MHz in Canada, I believe -- others will correct the frequencies if I am wrong). These are the two most commonly used amateur frequencies for Technicians. For repeaters, if the 2 meter repeaters are busy, you can usually find a 70 cm repeater that is open. Also, if you think you may get involved with Emergency Services, having 70 cm capability will come in handy.

 

As to why YOU would want one -- only you can determine that. But since you don't have your license yet, you are making your decisions without any experience. I recommend that you chat with a ham in your area and discuss the pros and cons of a dual band vs single band for your first ham radio. If you don't know any hams, check the internet for a club in your area and get in touch with them.

 

Also --- go get your license --- you won't regret that.

Share this post


Link to post

Yes the 150 is a nice radio. That was the first one i bought and i love it. But like others have said, once you get it you will wish you had bought a triband. Go for the 5r or the icom that Desert Warrior mentioned. I am looking at that radio for my next one myself.

 

KD7WLU

Share this post


Link to post
What is the purpose of a dual bander? What does it do?

Something you can do with a dual-bander: If you have a dual bander in your car, you can set it to cross-band repeat. That is anything on a specific frequency on 440 will be repeated to 2 meters. This allows you to take your 440 HT (dual band) with you yet have a full 50W signal (by relaying though your car) for getting out should the need arise.

 

If you're going to look at tri-banders, I'd suggest the Kenwood TH-F6A. 220MHz is a more practical 3rd band then 6 meters.

 

I also would urge you to find some local hams. We can only give you general advice. A local ham can tell you what the local situation is like and what repeaters are available. They can tell you if your HT can get out or if you'll need to use a mobile radio like I mentioned above.

Share this post


Link to post

While the VX-150 is a good radio at a good price, the VX-5R may serve your needs better for a longer time. I owned a 5R for a while and it was a flawless performer. After my wife got her VX-7R, I decided to sell the 5R and upgrade to a 7R, and have never regretted that decision.

 

The VX-7R has the capability for 220-mHz as well as the 50, 146, and 450-mHz ham bands. Using the VX-7 Commander programming software, the Yaesu VX-7R is difficult to beat. The price is reasonable as well.

Share this post


Link to post

Does Canada have a 1.25 meter band? If not, the VX-7R would be rather pointless in place of the VX-5R. Of course, it has several other features beyond those of the VX-5, but I'm not sure that they'd justify the additional expense without being able to use all four bands.

 

No, wait. It does have dual VFOs (basically, two different radios inside the case), so possibly it would be worth it. I still suspect that the VX-7 would be a bit much as a first radio for a new Ham.

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

×
×
  • Create New...