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Rhino 110 Or 120 - Opinons Please


lnk3d
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First off let me say thank you in advance for taking the time to post your opinions on this GPS / Ham

 

I currently do not have a license although I am working on my amature license.

 

What is the map accuracy of the Rhino?

 

Scale of Map when close to target ?

( Ive noticed some low end gps units only provide a scale of 200 ft when close to target, this unit will primiarly be used for geocaching and storm spotting. )

 

Battery life?

 

Range of transmission?

 

Thank You

Lnk3d

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The 120 is the only one with a map. So focus on that one if you are looking for a mapping GPS.

 

The "standard" is 2 miles for FRS frequency and 5 miles for GMRS frequencies. But, in other than flan treeless land, your mileage may vary.

 

Also, all you need is a no-test GMRS license.

Edited by DustyJacket
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I have 2 Rino 120's. The ability to transmit your gps position and recieve others happens on the FRS frequencies. Mine transmit and receive quite well on FRS frequencies. I do not know about the GMRS frequencies since I am not licensed for those, but specuating by comparing to FRS, they should also be quite good, but their antennae will be a limiting factor with no hookups for externals.

 

The maps zoom down to 20 feet legend level and the RINO's show a circle that represents the accuracy of the GPS and I have seen it go all the way down to 3 feet with a good signal and WAAS.

 

There are only two things I'd want more for my RINO's. More Memory and a color screen. Using my home state of Arkansas so that you will have an idea of road denisty, I can load 1/4 of the state, or roughly north of Interstate 40 and west of Little Rock. The grids that you can download can be quite large, and if you are loading maps for a trip, you can barely get an 8 hour trip loaded, so you will have to have a way to add more maps as you cross the country. The RINO's are great for traveling because you can tell where your partner is and the radio is quiet compared to the 11 meter CB.

 

I am surprised at Garmin's lackluster advertising for these radio/GPS units. They would be purchased considerably more if people knew they existed. I am hopeful that my two wishes for the increased memory and color screens come to pass. I do not regret my two RINO's and would only trade them for a color screen version with more memory.

 

The range varies for terrain. Car to Car on flat interstate got me almost a mile. Out in the open on the lake, almost 3.5 miles. On a mountain top talking to a friend in the valley, 7 miles. Country with trees, .5 to .75 mile. These are on the FRS frequencies.

 

Hope this answers some of your questions.

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The 120 does work well but they are very hard on batteries. Myself and another person in our camp bought the 120 for GPS and communication purposes. We find that the units will only run 4-6 hrs. on a set or 3- AA batts in the cold weather and 12 - 14 hrs in the warmer weather. Talk time during those periods would not be any greater than 10-15 mins.

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in my honest opinion, i have not seen a frs that can transmit over any useable range. this does not mean that they don't have thier place, they are great for short range. they are also inexpensive by themselves, i have seen one that works ok for 8$ at wal-mart. i just feel that you might be better spending that extra money on a better gps like the vista and buying a pair of cheap frs. the frs are limited by law for how much power output they have, so just about any one will do. i have 7 radios that do frs / gmrs.they are all about the same as far as communicationg, some just have more features. like i said, they are best for people wanting to communicate that are just out of shouting distance and not a whole lot more especially in a wooded area. the idea of the rhino is cool, but how many people do you plan on running into within a mile radius that would also have a frs let alone a rhino to interact with. i am not knocking the idea, just curious as to it's actual practicality.

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The Rino will interact with any other radio on the FRS system, and they do a good job at that. The range for a rino is 2.3 miles FRS and 4.5-5 for GMRS. The Rino is shipped to Canada with the GMRS turned off by a menu selection. If you were to buy a Rino and you are able to choose 110 0r 120 I would strongly recommend the 120. The mapping alone is worth the differance never mind the radio being switched to GMRS. The biggest caution with a Garmin product is the lack of compatibility with other map programs.

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how many people do you plan on running into within a mile radius that would also have a frs let alone a rhino to interact with.

My buddy and I use GPSr's and GMRS when we deer hunt. I'm intrigued by the possibilities if we were to use Rino 120s.

The range for a rino is 2.3 miles FRS and 4.5-5 for GMRS.

Well, those are the nominal ranges, but in practice, it's usually much less than that. Very rarely have I experienced one of these small GMRS radios that were effective over more than about a mile. Antenna's too short, not enough power. I don't use the FRS channels very much because the range would be even less with the reduced power.

Edited by boydg
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in my honest opinion, i have not seen a frs that can transmit over any useable range. this does not mean that they don't have thier place, they are great for short range. they are also inexpensive by themselves, i have seen one that works ok for 8$ at wal-mart. i just feel that you might be better spending that extra money on a better gps like the vista and buying a pair of cheap frs.

The rino 120 has several things over the etrex series.

o With radio turned off, the GPS can run 24 hours on 3AAA.

o heli antenna is much better than etrex patch

o proximity feature

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A clarification:

The Rino 120 can show your gps position whether you use frs or gmrs or have the radio module turned off. The Rino 120 can send it's location and receive locations from other Rino 110, 120 and 130's on frs channels only. Yes, the 130 is out and does even more and they have granted one of my wishes, more memory. I know some like having radio separate from gps, and i also carry a ham and cell phone, but both integrated together makes a very compact unit.

 

Some of the uses that a Rino would be great on are search and rescue and paint ball hunting. the Rino also can scramble voice so that you have a more private communication and can be set to vibrate on receive. The Rino 130 has a barometer and noaa weather freqs and can sent text messages (great for deer hunters in the stand not wanting to spook a potential deer but still keep in contact with other buddies and see where they are too so you don't mistake them for a deer...)

 

I wish my ham radio could have that capability built in also. but that day probably is very near also. i know that aprs has started all this and evolution will continue. the Rinos are a great radio, for the licensed power they are authorized to use and a good gps to boot.

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Yes, the 130 is out and does even more and they have granted one of my wishes, more memory.

I can't find the 130 available anywhere on the internet.

 

 

I was planning to get a 110 to work with my 120. Mostly due to the fact that no one has another Rino. However I think I'll just wait and upgrade to the 130. ;)

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:blink:

 

The new Rino 130 I think will be a great GPS to own if you are into Sea Kayaking. The Weather radio combined with the barometer is a big plus. Also the greater memory for mapping bluecharts as well as running the Metroguide makes it seamless to use from the car to the water.

 

The FRS is somewhat limited, and I sure wish that we could use the GMRS here in Canada. Seeing as here in Victoria we are surrounded on 3 sides by Washington State, I am sure there is some way around not having the GMRS...........

 

By the way, Garmin tells me to expect delivery of the new Rino 130s by the 2nd or 3rd week of January.

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One minor issue with the Rinos is that the GMRS seems to only put out 1W. I thought "full legal power" for GMRS was more like 5W.

Max legal power for GMRS is 50 watts, although fixed stations are limited to 15 watts and a "small base station" can only use 5 watts. Also, there are the "north of Line A or east of Line C" restrictions to 5 watts. Also, you're limited to 5 watts on the 462 MHz frequencies. And on, and on...

 

Part 95 is a bloody mess. They need to get the "non-individuals" moved over to another service, whack max power down to 5w, and clean up the regs. It's really unbelievable!

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Agreed, I would love to see the Rino's upgraded a bit in transmission wattage.

 

I have a pair of Midland G-300M's that transmit at 3W, these are ordinary over the counter units purchased from a local sporting goods store.

 

We were able to hit almost a full 3 miles with 1 unit stationary and the other unit inside of a moving vehicle. Now thats power! The G-300M's advertise they can reach up to 10 Miles at 3 watts (as I said 'advertised')

 

The rino 110 unit we can rarely get over 1 mile under the exact same conditions using either FRS or GMRS.

 

Anyone knows how to upgrade the rino 110/120/130 for a higher output wattage, I would love to know.

 

Thanks!

Edited by lnk3d
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I work with terrestrial microwave. For giggles I calculated that a pair of FRS radios, barring any interference or obstructions in the path, should be good for about 100 miles. This with about 90% probability. In my experience you should be good for 5-8 miles if one of the FRS radios is up nice and high. ie: lookout point on trail should talk to anywhere in the park. Being a ham myself, I usually rely on amateur radio so I'm spoiled with lower frequencies that penetrate foliage better and a lot more transmit power. :blink:

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Max legal power for GMRS is 50 watts, although fixed stations are limited to 15 watts and a "small base station" can only use 5 watts.

Typically a HT-like device is limited to 5W. Probably a combination of RF safety and battery weight limits. It's possible these consumer GMRS units are only 1-2W just to be able to get a reasonable battery life out of alkalines.

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I'm sure that the power is also limited to keep the cost down.

I was going to disagree, but when you add in the size and cost of heatsinks and all you could be right. Bottom line is that no one seems to be shopping by power, so the cost/benefit ratio for the manufacturer isn't there to go to higher power.

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I've been having a lot of trouble with my rino120 lately. Constantly locking up. Can't even shut it off, without removing the batteries. It is also just shuting down for no apparent reason, and again the batteries must be removed and replaced before it will start up again. I bought it a year ago in February. I am contacting Garmin tomorrow and am hoping for a good response. Although it works well enough when actually functioning, I'm not sure I can recommend it.

Edited by TheEdge
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I've been having a lot of trouble with my rino120 lately. Constantly locking up.

Have you checked to see if it's got the current firmware? If you've never updated it, it's no longer current since the last update was Oct 2003. I see a couple of changes in the history that might be the problem.

 

As old as the unit is, there might be a gasket failure that's let water in.

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I've been having a lot of trouble with my rino120 lately. Constantly locking up.

Have you checked to see if it's got the current firmware? If you've never updated it, it's no longer current since the last update was Oct 2003. I see a couple of changes in the history that might be the problem.

 

As old as the unit is, there might be a gasket failure that's let water in.

Thanks for the info Gekogeek....I had updated once, but I wasn't sure when so I just did it again incase there was something new added. I don't believe there is any problem with moisture getting into the case.

I believe I read something about the battery case not holding them securely, but it was before I had this problem so I didn't make note of it....duh.

Well, hopefully Garmin will have a fix for me...I'll let you know.

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I believe I read something about the battery case not holding them securely, but it was before I had this problem so I didn't make note of it....duh.

From what I remember I think that tended to make the unit turn off unexpectedly. Also it may have been battery brand-specific. Garmin engineered the unit to use a specific brand and failed to allow for the ever-so-slight difference in size between brands.

 

It doesn't sound like that's your problem, but I wouldn't rule it out. But since you've updated the firmware, it would be worth seeing if the problem is still there - and soon since the warranty is about up.

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We've had two Rino 120's for a year now and had mixed luck. The one I unwrapped first and called mine has worked great. The second one has been sent in under warranty twice for click stick repair. The second time Garmin replaced the 'defective media'. Their terms.

We had requested a new unit. But no such luck. The stick feels better but still jumps to other numbers sometimes when entering data. Out of warranty now but they have the records.

Have not used the radio function or the peer to peer features much. The wife finds them distracting while caching and thats mostly what they get used for. FRS was used a month ago on a camping/ fishing trip in a deep canyon with timber cover. We had poor reception at 3 miles and pretty good at 1 to 1.5 miles.

As far as finding caches and navigating they work great. Having two along on a hunt realy helps in the mountains and timber cover. The Rino 130's sound like a big improvement but I have't seen or used one.

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The 130's are great. I have one and find that the additional memory makes it that much more usable to me. I can keep all of Washington and some Idaho Metroguide in memory. Previously with my 120, I was only able to keep half - the eastern half in memory.

 

I really like the electronic compass. I guess I got tired of pacing back and forth just to get the 'walking compass' to register my movement. Keeping it level so the compass is correct can at times be a challenge, simply recalibrating it usually fixes that.

 

Found an altitude benchmark to confirm that the altimeter is within +/-5 feet of where expected - right out of the box.

 

The best part is that all of my 120 accessories work with the 130.

 

I'm a weather nut, so the weather alert and NOAA weather radio is a big plus. Sheer geek factor there...

 

Todd - K7PKT

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I haven't had very much luck with the radio on the 120. The max i can get is about 1 mile. There is no way you can get 5 miles out of the rino. We use Motorola T7200 during hunting season and those are a true 5 mile radio. If you are using it for geocaching, it works great. Otherwise, if you want true 5 mile range, go with something else.

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