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Gc'ing During Hunting Season


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I hunt and geocache and this is the best advice I can give. Stay on main trails look up for any tree stands in the area. If you see one be courteous and go around it as quietly as possible unless it is unoccupied. I hunt on private property that a friend of mine owns so I don't usually see someone I don't know.

Above all else WEAR ORANGE AND BE AWARE OF YOUR SURROUNDINGS.

Whatever you decide be safe and have fun.

J.D.

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Be aware that most hunting accidents occur during dawn and dusk when the light is dim and it's more difficult to see. I recommend wearing bright orange colors (colours for you Canadians) during the season.

 

Most hunters are going to be in designated hunting areas rather than metro-parks; but I'm only speaking for areas I know around central Ohio.

 

If you have any doubt about whether it's safe to cache an area DON'T!

 

Anyway, be safe and happy caching! ;)

 

DublinJeepers

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As both a hunter and a rookie geocacher, I'm glad this question was raised. My thoughts are that Geocaching is a year round activity, while hunting has very specific and short seasons. We can geocache outside of hunting season so why risk an accident (I hate that word - there is no such thing as a hunting "accident"...) and regardless of safety and any personal views on the ethics of hunting, why ruin a hunter's day by traipsing through his favorite spot on opening day.

 

My advice would be to stick to caches that you know are in public places like parks, urban/suburban locations, or other areas where hunting is prohibited. Save the other stuff for after hunting season. Why risk it??

 

And if you do go into the woods during hunting season, for GOD'S sake please wear as much Blaze Orange as you can so that you can be seen from afar. Not just a hat, but a vest or jacket as well. As much as you can wear. It's not a matter of being mistaken for a deer... it's a matter of seeing you standing 200 yards on the other side of that deer before a hunter pulls the trigger. Hunters are trained to be sure of both their target AND their backstop before they fire. Make sure that you are highly visible so that you don't mistakenly become that backstop. It's easy to distinguish between man and deer. It's not so easy to spot a man 300 yards away in the woods wearing a brown jacket. The hunter may be upset that you were there, particularly if you've wandered onto private land. but at least you'll be alive to hear about it! Besides, many states require that you wear orange in the woods anyway during hunting season, whether you are hunting or not. Check your local/state laws.

 

One last thing... it's your job to be alert as well! You should be looking for orange the whole time you are in the woods, and if you spot a hunter, make sure he sees you and sees what direction you are travelling in, then quietly and quickly leave the area. Keep moving in the direction he last saw you travelling in and don't double back. That way he'll have an idea of where you are and when you will be safely out of range.

 

Hope this helps!

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It's not a matter of being mistaken for a deer... it's a matter of seeing you standing 200 yards on the other side of that deer before a hunter pulls the trigger.

 

I agree. Wear as much orange as possible if you MUST cache in a place that is known to be occupied by hunters.

 

Hunters are trained to be sure of both their target AND their backstop before they fire.

 

I wish that were the case this past Tuesday when someone shot at a deer on the ridge behind me... and I actually heard the bullet go over my head!!! You all ain't never seen a fat guy move as fast as I did ;)

Edited by JeepinRedNeck
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Hunters are trained to be sure of both their target AND their backstop before they fire.

 

I wish that were the case this past Tuesday when someone shot at a deer on the ridge behind me... and I actually heard the bullet go over my head!!! You all ain't never seen a fat guy move as fast as I did ;)

It is true that hunters (in most states) must go through a hunter education/safety course. The problem is that the certificate is only paper (or plastic) and not every hunter follows every rule. The same can be said of ANY group of people. The best advice was mentioned above somewhere, and that is to WEAR ORANGE WHEN IN A HUNTING AREA. I am a hunter, so I speak from experience. That orange really does stand out against the bushes, trees, and snow. At the very least, wear an orange hat. You can get a beanie at Wal-Mart for under a dollar. They have cheap vests also. You want the hunter to see you hiking, that way he won't shoot you on accident.

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Hunters are trained to be sure of both their target AND their backstop before they fire.

Like the others said, I wish that were true. I've been a hunter for close to 45 yrs. The hunter safety courses I've seen don't really teach that much and they don't do a practical in the field exercise to ensure the student really learned anything. Every year hunters are shot by other hunters, often from their own hunting party. About 15 yrs ago 1/4 mile from me a hunter heard movement in some brush, fired at the sound, and hit his partner in the side with a 12 ga slug. Sure way to ruin a day out hunting. Unfortunately that's not an isolated incident. Most hunters I've seen are good, safe people but there are the "trash" hunters who haven't got a clue, nor care, about hunter safety.

Best advice is to avoid hunting areas during seasons. Wear plenty of orange. If you see a hunter, leave the area as quietly as possible.

Don't forget there's more than just fall deer season. We have spring turkey season here in April and May where you could easily walk upon a cammoed hunter. Fall bow season for deer runs from Oct until end of Dec, prime geocaching months around here.

Be careful and don't get lost following your GPS. Keep your eyes about you for what's around.

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I killed a deer this morning.

 

In my state turkey hunting is the most fatal season.

 

If you are afraid of guns don't buy any.

I don't think its a gun vs. anti-gun issue here...

I am very comfortable handling firearms, however I have no idea

how well trained the next guy is, whether he's had a few beers or if he's Criminal! :ph34r:

 

 

30296_400.gif30296_1700.gif

Edited by Doc-Dean
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I killed a deer this morning.

 

In my state turkey hunting is the most fatal season.

 

If you are afraid of guns don't buy any.

I don't think its a gun vs. anti-gun issue here...

I am very comfortable handling firearms, however I have no idea

how well trained the next guy is, whether he's had a few beers or if he's Criminal! :D

 

 

30296_400.gif30296_1700.gif

Actually, I just realized today that my CCW permit expired in October. I guess I'll be spending my lunch hour down at the courthouse on Monday. :ph34r:

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I like to play a joke on hunters, so I wear a brown suede jacket, white fanny pack and I tie branches to my head and I crawl around on all fours. You should see the look on their faces when they realize that I'm not a deer. Its priceless.

I play that game too! Only I usually don't do the branches. I just never find any realistic ones. :ph34r:
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Well, you go to a marine supply store and get one of those emergency signaling horns. When you get to an area where you know there are hunters, let that puppy blare for about 1 second every 5 seconds. There is NO WAY that any hunter would shoot by ACCIDENT. :ph34r:

Edited by BeDoggy
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I like to play a joke on hunters, so I wear a brown suede jacket, white fanny pack and I tie branches to my head and I crawl around on all fours.  You should see the look on their faces when they realize that I'm not a deer. Its priceless.

That reminds me of when I was a kid hunting with my Dad and his best friend. My Dad and I stayed together and the other guy took another road. We were hiking with our weapons on a steep, old overgrown two-track when we saw a pair of antlers sticking up from behind a fallen tree, pitching back and forth gently as if it were a LARGE feeding buck. I could feel my pulse accelerate as I eased off the safety and began to raise my rifle. Then Dad says, "wait..." Then my Dad's idiot friend stands up with the antlers in his hand, roaring with laughter. ( He always got a great kick out of teasing me) Taught me the lesson never to shoot at anything unless you can see it completely.

 

So make sure you do what you have to to really be seen.

Edited by BeDoggy
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In the Wild! 9 Mile Loop, I put it right on my cache description:

Shooting and dogs are allowed. A-zone deer season is from the second Saturday in August through the third Sunday in September, so if hunting bothers you, don’t come then. This is BLM land.

 

I didn't get a deer this year, but I did take a B&C Black Bear right along the Loop.

 

So I'll say it again, if you are afraid of hunting, don't go during hunting season.

Huntnlady

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Deer gun season opens monday in N/W Ohio.. Be careful out there, some shoot at sound not at what they see. I myself will wait a week before I venture out. There are two "first's" that you can count on in Ohio. The first person to die from eating poison mushrooms, and the first person to get shot during deer gun season..

 

augie

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When caching during hunting season, and all the hunters are standing around in camo clothing, inconspicuosly behind trees, would the best way to go about this for an animal lover be by being loud and trying to keep the hunter's prey at a distance?

 

(Ducking)

Noh Funpuns

:P:) Shunra?...you do know thats ILLEGAL in MOST states right? might well be dangerous in the wrong crowd also. :P:(

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We have a park here in MD I'd like to put a cache in, but I have a serious concern because the park has the trails labeled as hunting areas. I would certainly never want to be the cause of anyones injury because a I put a cache in harms way. I am going to see about putting it on the trail at the fringe of a hunting area just to be safe. Since I am not a hunter, I honestly don't even know if that much hunting goes on there. There are sooooo many other places to do it around here!

 

:rolleyes:

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Check out the rules for hunting in your area. Some states don't allow hunting on Sundays. Find out what season happens when, whether it's duck, deer, turkey, and bow, shotgun, or muzzle loader. Check with your local Department of Environmental Protection, or whatever your state calls it.

 

And mostly, make sure they can see you! 52133_1800.jpg Can you see me now?

 

Blaze orange hats, gloves, caps, and vests are available at Walmart really cheap. You need 12 square inches or more, I prefer more, lots more, front back and sides and head.

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I've been a birdwatcher for a long time now and the birding magazines have covered this topic every year. Wearing blaze orange and being aware of the rules of the area are important, but knowing the stats about the various hunting seasons is even more important.

 

Most of the people shot during deer gun/shotgun/muzzleloader season are hunters shot by fellow hunters. The most dangerous seasons for non-hunters are turkey and small game. Most people assume they are only at risk during the deer season and leave the blaze at home the rest of the time. In some states, the small game season can go on for months and some pretty high power ammunition is allowed.

 

Last year a hiker was shot in Ohio by a small game hunter. The police determined the hunter was nearly a half mile away and missed his target. Luckily, the hiker survived. The last I heard the lawsuits were still in the courts and the hunter was facing a short prison sentence and a lifetime license suspension. It's smart for both the hunter and the hiker to be careful out there.

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I hunt and cache. The best advice I can give, on top of Blaze Orange clothing, is to be heard. Don't go sneaking around, talk in a regular voice, not in whispers. If you doo see a hunter...get his attention. As a hunter, I'd much rather have a few deer spooked than see someone get shot.

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I was in a public park in the middle of Wichita, KS yesterday and there were a couple of kids a couple hundred yards away shooting .22's in my direction. By the time I got to where they were, they had skedaddled, but I wasn't going to hesitate in busting a couple of guns. I love my guns, but I use them responsibly!

 

Lots of good advice here, so I won't add more.

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Of course there are two schools of thought on this.

 

1. Wear camo and take your chances on not being seen.

2. Wear blaze orange and give every lunatic a perfect target! :)

 

With some of the types in California (HuntnLady aside) I prefer #1 above. Once I was sitting with my back to the trunk of a tree and another hunting party came and parked their truck right in front of me and were glassing the area pretty hard. After a couple of minutes of them doing that I spoke up in a normal voice "Are you going to be parked there very long? I'm having trouble seeing." Nobody had a gun in their hand otherwise I'd have just kept quiet and they would have eventually left anyway. The surprise was priceless, however.

 

OK, to keep this halfway on topic, I would have to admit that there would be a 3rd school of thought: Pass up on going out caching in hunting areas during hunting season. The season isn't that long and aside from the safety issues, I'd hate to be responsible for someone losing a shot because of my bumbling around looking for a cache (that can't get spooked.) That just isn't the way to make friends. :P -Ken

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I think what all these posts sum up is this -- make yourself as UN-camaflauged as possible -- wear stuff that screams out that you are not game. If you do decide to go caching in a pro-hunting neck of the woods, it would be useful to carry a loud air-horn -- ya know the kind that uses compressed air? Toot it every minute or so while you out looking for the stash. The hunters will appreciate that and it will keep you safe from being confused with that mighty 12 point buck. Hope this helps.

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Thats called hunter harassment and is illegal in some states.

In Ohio it will cost you a couple of hundred bucks, even if no hunters are present.

 

In a number of states it's also illegal to wear camo w/o some blaze orange in a designated hunting area during the gun season. Some require at least a blaze cap. Some require half or more of your body be covered with blaze.

 

The deer don't care, they're colorblind anyway.

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When caching during hunting season, and all the hunters are standing around in camo clothing, inconspicuosly behind trees, would the best way to go about this for an animal lover be by being loud and trying to keep the hunter's prey at a distance?

 

(Ducking)

Noh Funpuns

I had the great satisfaction of watching the last person to try this on my led away in cuffs, and get a hefty fine plus 200 hours community service in court.

 

Several years ago I had some petaheads tossing rocks into the creek I was trout fishing in, and got the same with them. The judge reallly, really laid it to them, being an avid fly fisherman himself.

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carry a loud air-horn -- ya know the kind that uses compressed air? Toot it every minute or so while you out looking for the stash. The hunters will appreciate that

 

Sorry, I'm from the Ted Nugent School of Animal Husbandry. While I haven't been hunting in (too) long of a time, I still say "kill it and grill it" is one of the best axioms ever.

 

I just wish I had the time to go out and do some caching. *sigh*. :unsure:

 

Anyone have a winning lottery ticket I can have? B)

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I aborted a cache attempt today (cache was in a wild life reserve) because I did not feel comfortable.

 

I had parked my car and was ready to start hiking when I noticed 7 hunters withing visual range.

 

Two things caught my attention:

 

1. All hunters were not carrying their guns safely (as I was taught)--pointing up or down, but never horizontal and pointing this-way-and-that-way.

 

2. I noticed that some hunters were only armed with hand guns (they walked past me) and I was concerned about stray bullets. While I am certainly no gun expert, I recall that a shotgun is lethal to approximately 600 yards (depends on type of shot) where as a 9mm is lethal to some 1800 yards.

 

As always geocache to your comfort level (hopefully your comfort level is inversely correlated with some danger scale). And be aware that hunting season may go from the fall through to the end of winter--check with your DNR.

 

Regards

RooBoy

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. While I am certainly no gun expert, I recall that a shotgun is lethal to  approximately 600 yards (depends on type of shot) where as a 9mm is lethal to some 1800 yards.

 

600 yards?!?!? Maybe with a slug, but not with actual shot. WOW! :o

A .22 can be deadly up to 2 miles, although you couldn't hit a target at that range if you tried.

A .300 Win Mag is deadly at over 6 miles.

 

This is why you NEVER fire without a solid backdrop. Never fire at an animal on the top of a ridge because you don't know what is on the other side. You don't know where the bullet will land.

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Do you really wanna be out in the sticks during hunting season, spookin game away from people with guns? Go for the urban caches during hunting season. It just makes sense to stay out of the way of hunters. Hunting season is not that long anyway.

By the way,I believe you ballistics experts need to go back to school.

 

Bender

Edited by Bender
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A .22 can be deadly up to 2 miles, although you couldn't hit a target at that range if you tried.

A .300 Win Mag is deadly at over 6 miles.

 

This is why you NEVER fire without a solid backdrop. Never fire at an animal on the top of a ridge because you don't know what is on the other side. You don't know where the bullet will land.

And that is the reason that I only hunt with blanks in my gun...... :o

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