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Geocaching 'packs'


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What do you guys carry with you when you are geocaching? When my wife and I go I carry a backback with a full size flashlight, a mini flashlight, GPS, extra batteries, whistle, reflective belt, things to trade in the cache, pen and paper, cell phone (turned off), mini first aid kit, bug repellant, knife, and depending on the cache a change of clothes.

 

Just curious as to what others take anong on the trip.

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Well, lemme go over the contents of my geocaching pack...

 

(Alpha begins imitating Slim Pickens')

 

Geocaching kit is as follows:

One Garmin GPS-3 Unit

One package extra AA batteries

One cellular telephone

One HP 2.3 megapixel camera

One Tripod

Five dollars

One medical kit containing asprin, allergy pills, anti-inflamation pills, bandages, survival booklet, and non-latex gloves

One booklet containing a a guide to poisionous snakes, edible plants, and the complete lyrics of "Blinded by the Light" by Manfred Mann's Earth Band

One swiss army knife

Three granola bars

One towel

One pair Church Shoes

One HK PSG-1 sniper rifle with combination night vision and thermal sight

One standard 74-minute compact disc- Ice House, "Primitive Man"

One hair dryer

Three propylatics

Twelve Listerine pocket-pack strips

One VHS cassette of "Ferris Buehler's Day Off"

One miniture effigy of Edward Teller

One blue-and-white geode

One cannister containing a half-liter of heavy water (H3O)

 

Shoot, a guy could have a great weekend in the woods with all this stuff!

 

CODENAME: ALPHA OPERATOR

daedalus://govlink/secure/majestic/12.12.12/ops/throne/AO

MAJESTIC-12: THRONE G6 LEVEL AGENT

http://www.planetdeusex.com

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quote:
One towel


 

A towel is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar cacher (hitchhiker) can have. Partly it has great practical value - you can wrap it around you for warmth as you bound across the cold moons of Jaglan Beta; you can lie on it on the brilliant marble-sanded beaches of Santraginus V, inhaling the heady sea vapours; you can sleep under it beneath the stars which shine soredly on the desert world of Kakrafoon; use it to sail a mini raft down the slow heavy river Moth; wet it for use in hand-to-hand-combat; wrap it round your head to ward off noxious fumes or to avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (a mindboggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you - daft as a brush, but very ravenous); you can wave your towel in emergencies as a distress signal, and of course dry yourself off with it if it still seems to be clean enough.

 

More importantly, a towel has immense psychological value. For some reason, if a strag (strag: non-cacher (hith-hiker)) discovers that a cacher (hitchhiker) has his towel with him, he will automatically assume that he is also in possession of a toothbrush, face flannel, soap, tin of biscuits, flask, compass, map, ball of string, gnat spray, wet weather gear, space suit etc., etc. Furthermore, the strag will then happily lend the cacher (hitchhiker) any of these or a dozen other items that the cacher (hitchhiker) might accidentally have "lost". What the strag will think is that any man who can hitch the length and breadth of the galaxy, rough it, slum it, struggle against terrible odds, win through, and still knows where his towel is is clearly a man to be reckoned with. icon_biggrin.gif

 

"...Not all those who wander are lost..."

 

[This message was edited by mikechim on June 24, 2002 at 05:12 PM.]

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quote:
One towel


 

A towel is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar cacher (hitchhiker) can have. Partly it has great practical value - you can wrap it around you for warmth as you bound across the cold moons of Jaglan Beta; you can lie on it on the brilliant marble-sanded beaches of Santraginus V, inhaling the heady sea vapours; you can sleep under it beneath the stars which shine soredly on the desert world of Kakrafoon; use it to sail a mini raft down the slow heavy river Moth; wet it for use in hand-to-hand-combat; wrap it round your head to ward off noxious fumes or to avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (a mindboggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you - daft as a brush, but very ravenous); you can wave your towel in emergencies as a distress signal, and of course dry yourself off with it if it still seems to be clean enough.

 

More importantly, a towel has immense psychological value. For some reason, if a strag (strag: non-cacher (hith-hiker)) discovers that a cacher (hitchhiker) has his towel with him, he will automatically assume that he is also in possession of a toothbrush, face flannel, soap, tin of biscuits, flask, compass, map, ball of string, gnat spray, wet weather gear, space suit etc., etc. Furthermore, the strag will then happily lend the cacher (hitchhiker) any of these or a dozen other items that the cacher (hitchhiker) might accidentally have "lost". What the strag will think is that any man who can hitch the length and breadth of the galaxy, rough it, slum it, struggle against terrible odds, win through, and still knows where his towel is is clearly a man to be reckoned with. icon_biggrin.gif

 

"...Not all those who wander are lost..."

 

[This message was edited by mikechim on June 24, 2002 at 05:12 PM.]

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Well, I must tell ya, however, that if I had to choose between the towel and the HK-PSG1, I'd have to take the PSG1. A towel just can't drop a terrorist or enemy combatant at 1,000+ yards like a PSG1 can. The .308 precision-made ammuniton and 3.5lb trigger pull beat... ... ...well-woven fibers anyday.

 

But, if I had to choose between the PSG1 and the hair dryer, I'd have to choose the hair dryer. You can't get your hair looking nice with a PSG1. (Quite the opposite, actually.) And, of course, the heavy water... but at least where I am, I'm not going to run into a heavy-water compatible reactor (like the Canadian CANDU) where it could be used, unfortunately. (God, one positive-coefficient and they make it unbuildable in the US, man the USNRC is paranoid...)

 

CODENAME: ALPHA OPERATOR

daedalus://govlink/secure/majestic/12.12.12/ops/throne/AO

MAJESTIC-12: THRONE G6 LEVEL AGENT

http://www.planetdeusex.com

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quote:
Originally posted by mikechim:

quote:
One towel


 

A towel is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have. Partly it has great practical value - you can wrap it around you for warmth as you bound across the cold moons of Jaglan Beta; you can lie on it on the brilliant marble-sanded beaches of Santraginus V, inhaling the heady sea vapours; you can sleep under it beneath the stars which shine soredly on the desert world of Kakrafoon; use it to sail a mini raft down the slow heavy river Moth; wet it for use in hand-to-hand-combat; wrap it round your head to ward off noxious fumes or to avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (a mindboggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you - daft as a brush, but very ravenous); you can wave your towel in emergencies as a distress signal, and of course dry yourself off with it if it still seems to be clean enough.

 

More importantly, a towel has immense psychological value. For some reason, if a strag (strag: non-hitch hiker) discovers that a hitchhiker has his towel with him, he will automatically assume that he is also in possession of a toothbrush, face flannel, soap, tin of biscuits, flask, compass, map, ball of string, gnat spray, wet weather gear, space suit etc., etc. Furthermore, the strag will then happily lend the hitchhiker any of these or a dozen other items that the hitchhiker might accidentally have "lost". What the strag will think is that any man who can hitch the length and breadth of the galaxy, rough it, slum it, struggle against terrible odds, win through, and still knows where his towel is is clearly a man to be reckoned with. icon_biggrin.gif

 

"...Not all those who wander are lost..."


 

ROFL icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

 

Now if we can work in a Dirk Gently reference somehow on what to bring to the woods....

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quote:
Originally posted by mikechim:

quote:
One towel


 

A towel is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have. Partly it has great practical value - you can wrap it around you for warmth as you bound across the cold moons of Jaglan Beta; you can lie on it on the brilliant marble-sanded beaches of Santraginus V, inhaling the heady sea vapours; you can sleep under it beneath the stars which shine soredly on the desert world of Kakrafoon; use it to sail a mini raft down the slow heavy river Moth; wet it for use in hand-to-hand-combat; wrap it round your head to ward off noxious fumes or to avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (a mindboggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you - daft as a brush, but very ravenous); you can wave your towel in emergencies as a distress signal, and of course dry yourself off with it if it still seems to be clean enough.

 

More importantly, a towel has immense psychological value. For some reason, if a strag (strag: non-hitch hiker) discovers that a hitchhiker has his towel with him, he will automatically assume that he is also in possession of a toothbrush, face flannel, soap, tin of biscuits, flask, compass, map, ball of string, gnat spray, wet weather gear, space suit etc., etc. Furthermore, the strag will then happily lend the hitchhiker any of these or a dozen other items that the hitchhiker might accidentally have "lost". What the strag will think is that any man who can hitch the length and breadth of the galaxy, rough it, slum it, struggle against terrible odds, win through, and still knows where his towel is is clearly a man to be reckoned with. icon_biggrin.gif

 

"...Not all those who wander are lost..."


 

ROFL icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

 

Now if we can work in a Dirk Gently reference somehow on what to bring to the woods....

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In my pack...

 

Garmin eTrex

Batteries in outer pocket (I end up changing them while driving a lot of the time, it's scary)

A Travel Bug

Water

Granola

Printouts for all the local caches I haven't found

Pen

Toys

Flashlight

 

The pack lives in my trunk 24/7/364.25. That way, I can go caching at my leisure.

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quote:
Originally posted by Fortner Family Cachers:

 

ROFL icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

 

Now if we can work in a Dirk Gently reference somehow on what to bring to the woods....


 

There's always the electric monk. It can follow you around and believe that you'll find the cache even when you don't.

 

Remeber, the electric monk will believe in things even people in Utah won't believe in.

 

george

 

Remember: Half the people you meet are below average.

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quote:
Originally posted by Fortner Family Cachers:

 

ROFL icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

 

Now if we can work in a Dirk Gently reference somehow on what to bring to the woods....


 

There's always the electric monk. It can follow you around and believe that you'll find the cache even when you don't.

 

Remeber, the electric monk will believe in things even people in Utah won't believe in.

 

george

 

Remember: Half the people you meet are below average.

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I just bring my wife...she brings her bag and only God knows what is in there and he is the only one brave enough to look!

 

A hair dryer?? Which trees can you plug it into? I also like the high powered rifle..there are a lot of nasty caches out there!

 

Happy caching.

El Diablo

 

Everything you do in life...will impact someone,for better or for worse.

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Here in the flatlands of Illinois, a full pack isn't really necessary. I found the bag pictured below at a local Wal-mart.

 

The bag was designed for turkey hunters to store their calls and other equipment in, but it could have just as easily been designed for Geocachers. It has 3 separate zippered compartments. The one in front, I use for my own supplies. There's a small first-aid kit, some bug spray, my compass and a disposable camera. The second zippered compartment is very small, so I use it for extra AA batteries for my GPSr. The third compartment is the largest and I use it to store all the items I might trade in a Geocache.

 

Other than that, the bag also has straps on the back to attach it to your belt and an elastic band on the side that holds a small flashlight (or a bottle of water) very nicely.

 

Currently it's having a nifty new Geocaching.com patch sewn onto the front of it . . hopefully I'll get it back soon. icon_wink.gif

 

Bret

 

bag1.jpg

 

"The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field.

When a man found it, he hid it again."

Mt. 13:44

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Here in the flatlands of Illinois, a full pack isn't really necessary. I found the bag pictured below at a local Wal-mart.

 

The bag was designed for turkey hunters to store their calls and other equipment in, but it could have just as easily been designed for Geocachers. It has 3 separate zippered compartments. The one in front, I use for my own supplies. There's a small first-aid kit, some bug spray, my compass and a disposable camera. The second zippered compartment is very small, so I use it for extra AA batteries for my GPSr. The third compartment is the largest and I use it to store all the items I might trade in a Geocache.

 

Other than that, the bag also has straps on the back to attach it to your belt and an elastic band on the side that holds a small flashlight (or a bottle of water) very nicely.

 

Currently it's having a nifty new Geocaching.com patch sewn onto the front of it . . hopefully I'll get it back soon. icon_wink.gif

 

Bret

 

bag1.jpg

 

"The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field.

When a man found it, he hid it again."

Mt. 13:44

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quote:
Originally posted by Alan2:

I'm fron NYC and I was never in the scouts so please excuse the question, Jenny. But couldn't you just "bury" it? I mean, isn't toilet paper bio-degradable? Plus you'll be fertilizing the ground! (of course not by the cache). icon_confused.gif

 

Alan


 

HEY Alan!

 

Don't try to be stealing my idea! icon_wink.gif I have already suggested this in another (more funny) thread and I have applied for a patent for the term "PFS".

 

(See: http://opentopic.Groundspeak.com/0/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=1750973553&f=3000917383&m=8350940484&r=7910945684#7910945684 )

 

--majicman

 

(Always trade UP in both quantity and quality and Geocaches will be both self-sustaining and self-improving!)

 

[This message was edited by majicman on June 26, 2002 at 09:28 AM.]

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quote:
Originally posted by Alan2:

I'm fron NYC and I was never in the scouts so please excuse the question, Jenny. But couldn't you just "bury" it? I mean, isn't toilet paper bio-degradable? Plus you'll be fertilizing the ground! (of course not by the cache). icon_confused.gif

 

Alan


 

HEY Alan!

 

Don't try to be stealing my idea! icon_wink.gif I have already suggested this in another (more funny) thread and I have applied for a patent for the term "PFS".

 

(See: http://opentopic.Groundspeak.com/0/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=1750973553&f=3000917383&m=8350940484&r=7910945684#7910945684 )

 

--majicman

 

(Always trade UP in both quantity and quality and Geocaches will be both self-sustaining and self-improving!)

 

[This message was edited by majicman on June 26, 2002 at 09:28 AM.]

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quote:
Originally posted by Alan2:

I'm fron NYC and I was never in the scouts so please excuse the question, Jenny. But couldn't you just "bury" it? I mean, isn't toilet paper bio-degradable? Plus you'll be fertilizing the ground! (of course not by the cache). icon_confused.gif

 

Alan


 

To be in complete compliance with the "leave no trace" philosophy you should pack it out. I don't do it and have no intention of doing it (gross), but there actually are reasons for it. Biodegradable materials can still last a long time, bury too shallow and critters dig it up, bury too deep and it won't decompose.

 

You could always just use leaves, but be sure you take your field guide to plants. Uh, Doc I got this rash... icon_redface.gif

 

Rusty...

 

Rusty & Libby's Geocache Page

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quote:
Originally posted by Alan2:

I'm fron NYC and I was never in the scouts so please excuse the question, Jenny. But couldn't you just "bury" it? I mean, isn't toilet paper bio-degradable? Plus you'll be fertilizing the ground! (of course not by the cache). icon_confused.gif

 

Alan


 

To be in complete compliance with the "leave no trace" philosophy you should pack it out. I don't do it and have no intention of doing it (gross), but there actually are reasons for it. Biodegradable materials can still last a long time, bury too shallow and critters dig it up, bury too deep and it won't decompose.

 

You could always just use leaves, but be sure you take your field guide to plants. Uh, Doc I got this rash... icon_redface.gif

 

Rusty...

 

Rusty & Libby's Geocache Page

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I make my living as a wilderness guide/instructor and I can't begin to count the number of times we have found toilet paper strewn all over the mountains...if you don't have the class to pack it out, at least hold it till you get home so the rest of us don't have to look at it.

 

Climbers and real back packers have been packing it out for years, get used to it, or stay out of the woods......I'm tired of looking at your s--t icon_mad.gif.

 

 

Sorry bout sounding so harsh, but that's a pet peeve of those who live in the woods.

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I make my living as a wilderness guide/instructor and I can't begin to count the number of times we have found toilet paper strewn all over the mountains...if you don't have the class to pack it out, at least hold it till you get home so the rest of us don't have to look at it.

 

Climbers and real back packers have been packing it out for years, get used to it, or stay out of the woods......I'm tired of looking at your s--t icon_mad.gif.

 

 

Sorry bout sounding so harsh, but that's a pet peeve of those who live in the woods.

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Mikechim and Enfanta,

What an awesome reference! If I didn't already have a caching username, I'd sure take Dirk Gently! Holistic detecting would get ya lots of "finds"! icon_biggrin.gif

 

(For those who may not know, the towel and the Dirk references are from books written by a demi-god [i.e. really good author] named Douglas Adams.)

-----

froggy.gif You must be present to win.

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Mikechim and Enfanta,

What an awesome reference! If I didn't already have a caching username, I'd sure take Dirk Gently! Holistic detecting would get ya lots of "finds"! icon_biggrin.gif

 

(For those who may not know, the towel and the Dirk references are from books written by a demi-god [i.e. really good author] named Douglas Adams.)

-----

froggy.gif You must be present to win.

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My backpack contains:

 

1 First Aid Kit

1 Snake Bite Kit

2 2-way radios

1 set extra batteries

bunch of extra zip lock bags

5 small garbage bags

maps and printouts of cache areas

items to trade

baggy of baby wipes (used to clean hands and other body areas) icon_biggrin.gif

1 or 2 bottles of Pepsi

Compass

Cell phones

Windbreaker

El cheapo digital camera

 

Plus I carry with me:

Walking stick

Canteens of Water

and of course my GPS

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My backpack contains:

 

1 First Aid Kit

1 Snake Bite Kit

2 2-way radios

1 set extra batteries

bunch of extra zip lock bags

5 small garbage bags

maps and printouts of cache areas

items to trade

baggy of baby wipes (used to clean hands and other body areas) icon_biggrin.gif

1 or 2 bottles of Pepsi

Compass

Cell phones

Windbreaker

El cheapo digital camera

 

Plus I carry with me:

Walking stick

Canteens of Water

and of course my GPS

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My outfit is a LowePro camera bag. It contains:

Pentax PZ1 with 28 to 80 zoom

100 to 300 zoom

filters & film

Magellan MERIGREEN

glasses

cell phone

pen

whistle

compass

defense spray

 

I am seldom more than 1.5 miles from the road and it usually only takes an hour or less to reach the cache.

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quote:
Originally posted by mtnsteve:

Climbers and real back packers have been packing it out for years, get used to it, or stay out of the woods......I'm tired of looking at your s--t.

 

Sorry bout sounding so harsh, but that's a pet peeve of those who live in the woods.


 

Just curious, what do you do with it when you get home? I'm assuming that most of it goes in the toilet, but what do you do with that dirty plastic bag? The trash? Is that any more environmentally sound?

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The way most folks to it is like this....you take the paper you have used and wrap it in one or two sheet's of clean paper, then place it in another zip lock bag...it's actually rather simple. You don't get any on you or on the bag you use.

 

For folks who use the wilderness on a regular basis, this is how it's done...there is nothing worse then finding a beautiful location in the mountains, only to discover that someone who doesn't know better, or just doesn't care, has buried his/her paper..only to have the animals dig it up and leave it exposed all over the area.

 

This is just common courtesy, like not leaving your trash behind or not trenching around your tent. The woods have become very crowded, climbers on some mountains are required to not only pack out their paper, but the solid waste as well.

 

Geocaching is a wonderful sport, it is exposing many folks to the woods that would have never ventured out before...because of that, many are not aware of the "rules" (man, I hate that term) , that the rest of us have been following for years....pack it in/pack it out (this includes women packing out their Tampons, etc) , the down hill skier/hiker has the right of way, don't feed the animals, leave only footprints, step aside for pack animals, don't cut down fresh pine branches for your bed, don't trench around your tent, these kind's of things.

 

I just returned from a 10 day trip in the mountains, some of the most beautiful spots I know of were ruined because the people who visited last had buried their paper.... beautiful campsites, spots along the river and even on the top of a peak were strewn with used toilet paper...not a pretty site.

 

I believe that a zip lock bag, in the trash, with perhaps a tiny bit of solid waste on the inside, is far superior to a campsite with used toilet paper strewn all around, don't you? Believe me, I don't enjoy doing it, but at least when the next folks come up behind me, they wont have to look at it because I thought it was to "gross" to dispose of properly.

 

Oh yea, because of this, I always have a packet of Handy Wipes in my pack.

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quote:
One pair Church Shoes

 

I noticed the towel, and was going to make a Hitchhiker's Guide to the galaxy reference, when I saw that someone else already had...but then I noticed the Church Shoes! That's got to be the funniest thing I've heard of. What do you keep them in your caching backpack for?

 

I've got to admit, however, that a towel is an incredibly useful item. I need one in my backpack.

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quote:
Originally posted by mtnsteve:

 

I just returned from a 10 day trip in the mountains, some of the most beautiful spots I know of were ruined because the people who visited last had buried their paper.... beautiful campsites, spots along the river and even on the top of a peak were strewn with used toilet paper...not a pretty site.

 

I believe that a zip lock bag, in the trash, with perhaps a tiny bit of solid waste on the inside, is far superior to a campsite with used toilet paper strewn all around, don't you?


 

mtnsteve,

 

I think the problem is that most people think that when it is buried it stays buried. Thanks for the clarification (and the technique).

 

You also mentioned several "rules" for the outdoors. Things have changed a lot in the last decade or two regarding these rules. I think your experience would be helpful in bringing many of us old campers up to date and introducing new outdoorsmen (and women) to today's outdoor etiquette. Could you please start another topic in this forum and include all of the ideas you can think of. I sincerely think that it would be very helpful to most of us.

 

[This message was edited by geospotter on June 28, 2002 at 09:59 AM.]

 

[This message was edited by geospotter on June 28, 2002 at 10:00 AM.]

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That's a really good idea, sometimes things are done differently in other parts of the county, handling the bathroom situation in the desert and on the coast is REALLY different ....I would enjoying learning how the "rules" have changed in different areas myself.

 

I know when snowshoeing became popular out here, we had some minor problems, and a few rescues, because some of the folks who ventured out into the snow, were new to the mountains and in a new element, some just didn't know how to handle it properly, plus, like you said, things have changed over the years....I really miss drinking water right out of the stream!

 

I will put some thoughts together....I would enjoying hearing some ideas from the rest of you on how we can all become more responsible Geocachers and outdoors people.

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