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Geocaching by Bicycle?


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My wife and I are getting new mountain bikes, and I have already purchased my GPS mount., icon_biggrin.gif Has anyone else here used mountain bikes for caching, and if so, how did it work out for you? Do you still do caches by bike, or did you kind of burn out on the whole approach?

 

_ __ ____________________________________________________________ __ _

On my first day of school, my parents dropped me off at the wrong nursery -- there I was, surrounded by trees and shrubs.....

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Max...

 

I have a road bike that I've cached with a few times. You can read my April 1 log, my March 8 log, or my December 28 log.

 

There aren't really many caches around me that a mountain bike would be useful for.

 

You don't mention what type of GPS you have, but I have a Meridian, and I've found that because the GPS is mounted horizontally in the bike mount, the reception suffers. With a patch antenna in a Garmin, the horizontal mount would probably work much better.

 

I like caching with my bike... of course, I like to ride anyway, and caching just gives me a destination.

 

Jamie

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You bet I've used mountain bikes! I generally only use them for hiding caches, though (examples are my Capitol Peak Bachelor Party Mountain Bike Cache and my Cougar Rock Cache). My reason for that is that most caches hidden around here are not in bike-friendly territory, and even when they are, they are generally not placed along a very ideal ride.

 

This summer I'm hoping to plant some caches for mountain bikers, i.e. caches along mountain-bike friendly trails in places where a mountain bike is an advantage (i.e. 10 miles into a 20 mile ride). I don't expect many visits to these caches, but want to provide something for those interested in the idea.

 

I was going to do this last summer, but there was some sort of distraction with a wedding or something! icon_wink.gif

 

24_700.gif

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Whenever I go caching alone I try to find caches that are mountain bike accessible. Hard to find many of them around here. Would be a lot easier if there was some way to identify a cache as bicycle friendly. One of the problems I've run into is caches located on trails where mountain bikes are not allowed. On these caches I usually push or carry my bike. The few caches I've placed can be found on mountain bike and I usually say so in the cache description. FYI, I have a Garmin 12 and use the Garmin handlebar mount. Works great!

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quote:
Originally posted by Max Wedge:

Do you still do caches by bike, or did you kind of burn out on the whole approach?


When possible, yes! icon_cool.gif For example:

 

Aylesworth Dam

Jacobsburg by Bike or Hike

Mountain Spring Lake Siding

 

I've done about 8 Geocache hunts so far via mountain bike. My setup consists of a Garmin GA27C remote amplified antenna which I attach to the top of my helmet with Velcro. The GPSr usually goes in a fanny pack. I've also used it to create track logs of some of my favorite mountain biking trails. Cheers ...

 

~Rich in NEPA~

 

1132_1200.jpg

 

=== A man with a GPS receiver knows where he is; a man with two GPS receivers is never sure. ===

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quote:
Originally posted by Max Wedge:

My wife and I are getting new mountain bikes, and I have already purchased my GPS mount., icon_biggrin.gif Has anyone else here used mountain bikes for caching, and if so, how did it work out for you? Do you still do caches by bike, or did you kind of burn out on the whole approach?

 

_ __ ____________________________________________________________ __ _

On my first day of school, my parents dropped me off at the wrong nursery -- there I was, surrounded by trees and shrubs.....


 

Anytime the trail is rideable I try to bring my bike. There are also series of caches along urban bike trails where you can ride the lenght of the nice paved trails and keep hitting caches every 1/2 mile or mile along a 5 mile trail. Sure beats walking.

 

I actually found out about geocaching through moutain biking. I was out with some buddies riding a trail about an hour from my house and right in the middle of the ride we had to stop. One of the guys in the group was hiding a cache.

"What in the world are you doing?"

"Geocaching."

"What? You hiding money?"

"No C-A-C-H-E not cash."

"What?"

 

He explained. On the way home I stopped and bought a gps.

 

george

 

 

george

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I’ve hunted a few on my Mt. Bike, but found that while it works out ok while getting near the cache, you do have to get off the bike when closing in. At that point it feels like you're Lewis and Clark in the backcountry dragging your bike over whatever nature between you and the cache. I have also left the bike on the ground and off the trail to continue the search. But beware, waypoint the bike unless you want to add finding your bike to your hunt icon_redface.gif . The first time out with the bike, it took me longer to find the bike that the cache.

 

Strange how the woods look completely different when tracking back!

 

 

BB12.jpg

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I have what looks like a bunch of mountainbike friendly caches in my area, along with some that are not too far away from places we travel regularly. I picked up her bike yesterday, and I already have the bike mount for my Globalmap100.

(Anyone know what kind of antenna it has?) I plan on mounting it mostly horizontal. I also plan to use the handlebar mount on my Kawasaki KLX occasionally too, so that I can find my way back to where I parked the trailer, and can get an idea how fast I'm going when I go over the bars. icon_eek.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by Jamie Z:

Max...

 

I have a road bike that I've cached with a few times. You can read my http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.asp?ID=16922 log, my http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.asp?ID=510 log, or my http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.asp?ID=1324 log.

 


 

35 miles!?! is that by the GPS or a odometer? After reading your logs, I can't wait to get my new bike! I haven't ever recorded the dstance of any rides by bike, but now I'm curious.

 

_ __ ____________________________________________________________ __ _

On my first day of school, my parents dropped me off at the wrong nursery -- there I was, surrounded by trees and shrubs.....

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Max...

 

My distances are measured with the cyclometer (or cyclecomputer) on my bike. It measures speed and distance with a little spinning magnet on your front wheel. Of course, you could use the speedometer and odometer on your GPS, but it won't be as accurate.

 

If you're interested in your distance and/or speed, I recommend checking out a cyclometer. Cheap ones can be had at nearly any department store for around $20. At a bike shop, you can find them from $40 to $100. Even the cheapest ones will have an speedometer, odometer, and usually average speed and a timer. The better ones have a clock, backlight, more than one tripmeter, some will tell you your pedal RPM, and some are even cordless.

 

Depending on your interest, the cheapest model will probably suit you fine. Installation is very easy, just be sure to calibrate it correctly to your wheel size. Of course, if you purchase it at a bike shop, they'll probably intall it and calibrate it for you for free or a small fee, and then show you how to use it. That's one of the big advantages of a bike shop staffed with knowledgable folks.

 

Keep in mind that I ride a road bike. 35 miles isn't a whole lot on a road bike, but on a mountain bike through trails, 35 miles might be an entire days riding and be far beyond most peoples capabilities.

 

Mountain bike riding on trails might be somewhere around twice as much, or more, work as pedaling a road bike on the road. Even pedaling a mountain bike on a road uses more energy than pedaling a road bike due to its higher weight and higher-friction tires, and gearing designed for low-speed travel.

 

I have a lot of fun with my cyclometer. I enjoy the numbers of the sport. I like to quantify my increasing fitness with times and mileage. Some friends of mine could care less how far they've ridden. It all depends on your view.

 

Jamie

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Thanks for the info. Can't wait to try this out.

I also get a little help from my oldest son, who just happened to get a job at a nice bike shop nearby (hence, the new bikes.) icon_biggrin.gif

 

_ __ ____________________________________________________________ __ _

On my first day of school, my parents dropped me off at the wrong nursery -- there I was, surrounded by trees and shrubs.....

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quote:
Originally posted by Moun10Bike:

You bet I've used mountain bikes! I generally only use them for hiding caches, though (examples are my http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.asp?ID=3062 and my http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.asp?ID=2682). My reason for that is that most caches hidden around here are not in bike-friendly territory, and even when they are, they are generally not placed along a very ideal ride.

 

This summer I'm hoping to plant some caches for mountain bikers, i.e. caches along mountain-bike friendly trails in places where a mountain bike is an advantage (i.e. 10 miles into a 20 mile ride). I don't expect many visits to these caches, but want to provide something for those interested in the idea.

 

 


 

 

I really wish cache hiders would post on the cache page if you can bike to the cache without much trouble. My brother, RacerB, is placing caches at most of the mtb race courses here in MO. They are all "bike friendly". I also use my bike to maintain my hidden caches, and have used it to find a few also.

 

The Mountain Bike Guy.

17228_200.jpg

Long Live Long Rides!

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quote:
Originally posted by Jamie Z:

Max...

 

My distances are measured with the cyclometer (or cyclecomputer) on my bike. It measures speed and distance with a little spinning magnet on your front wheel. Of course, you could use the speedometer and odometer on your GPS, but it won't be as accurate.

 

Jamie


 

I've done a couple road rides with my bike computer and the gps and I find that the match up quite closely. I tend to believe the gps more than the bike computer.

 

I used to work in a bike shop and ride with lots of guys and there is a wide range of discrepancy between bike computers. If your air pressure changes on your bike tire it'll change your computer reading. It's not much per revlolution but over a distance of a good 60-80 mile bike ride it can be off by quite a bit.

 

That's just my opinion, I'd have to do a real 'study' to make any definite decisions.

 

george

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G&M,

 

No doubt both GPS and cyclometer will have errors. The reason I believe what my cyclometer says over my GPS is that the cyclometer measures the rotation of the wheel for every move I make. The GPS on the other hand, only gives an approximation of the route. That is, when I go around a corner, the cyclometer can record each revolution of the front wheel, which is a perfect reproduction of my path. The GPS will approximate that curve with a bunch of straight lines which will always result in a shorter distance. Not to mention loss of signal due to trees or other obstacles.

 

Of course, what you mention about tire pressure is true, but that's an error that can be quantified much more easily than GPS error.

 

When I had my yellow eTrex mounted to my bike, my speed and distances on the GPS and cyclometer were always very similar. Now that I've gotten my Meridian Gold, the numbers are way off. I don't know why. The Meridian seems to fluctuate quite a bit more.

 

Jamie

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I was originally going to post this reply sometime ago, unfortunately the tread was archived before I could, but I think it is pertinent to this thread.

 

Well, being a skydiver I will try jumping with a GPSr. But I believe it will give speed in vertical freefall, because it will read the change between two points. Also my Garmin III+ track log can be setup to record by time, distance or resolution but not altitude (Garmin76 does record altitude). The resolution can be set from 1 foot to 9999 feet and is a combination of time and distance.

Odometer readings should be close if the resolution is not set too high, same on a roller coaster, but the tract log area of an GPSr will fill up quickly.

 

Pat in Louisiana watch out for dcfox, remember what was shown on The Worlds Worst Drivers—someone took out their new Porsche to see how fast it could go (almost300 kph). He also video taped the run, sold the tapes and was busted when a cop saw the tape.

 

Buck8Point, my GPSr track record does record date, time, speed and track number. I use GPSU 4.03 to down load the track to my computer and all of the info is there.

 

With a GPSr I know where I am, if only I could remember why I am here.

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quote:
Originally posted by Jamie Z:

The reason I believe what my cyclometer says over my GPS is that the cyclometer measures the rotation of the wheel for every move I make.


 

Hey, I'll bet you never realized that your front wheel travels farther than your rear wheel! icon_eek.gif

Think about it. icon_biggrin.gif

 

~Rich in NEPA~

 

1132_1200.jpg

 

=== A man with a GPS receiver knows where he is; a man with two GPS receivers is never sure. ===

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quote:
Originally posted by Rich in NEPA

 

Hey, I'll bet you never realized that your front wheel travels farther than your rear wheel! icon_eek.gif

Think about it. icon_biggrin.gif

 

_~Rich in NEPA~_

 

http://img.Groundspeak.com/user/1132_1200.jpg

 

__=== A man with a GPS receiver knows where he is; a man with two GPS receivers is never sure. ===__


 

The rear wheel always wants to take the cheater way, cutting conrners all the time.

 

The biggest error for cyclecomputers is that most people don't set them up as accurately as then can. I know a few guys who always seem to be going just a little faster or a little further then me on every ride.

Compareing max speed at the end of down hill run.

"How fast did you go?"

"48.3 mph, you?"

"47.6 mph. Should have tucked more."

 

george

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quote:
Originally posted by Rich in NEPA:

 

Hey, I'll bet you never realized that your front wheel travels farther than your rear wheel! icon_eek.gif

Think about it. icon_biggrin.gif


 

Rich, of course I did.

 

BTW, I see you use clipless pedals on your mountain bike. I've got a mountian biking friend that is convinced that clipless pedals would kill him if he tried them on his bike. When I first got clipless on my road bike and talked about how wonderful they were, he insisted that no person in their right mind would put clipless pedals on a mountain bike. I've tried to convince him that people do it, but he thinks it's nuts.

 

What do you have to say about that?

 

Jamie

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quote:
Originally posted by Jamie Z:

 

Rich, of course I did.

 

BTW, I see you use clipless pedals on your mountain bike. I've got a mountian biking friend that is convinced that clipless pedals would kill him if he tried them on his bike. When I first got clipless on my road bike and talked about how wonderful they were, he insisted that no person in their right mind would put clipless pedals on a mountain bike. I've tried to convince him that people do it, but he thinks it's nuts.

 

What do you have to say about that?

 

Jamie


 

Toe straps are scary and flat pedals are scary too. I've crashed so many times and I've never been trapped in my pedals. At this point it's a reflex and I don't even have to think about unclipping. If I had to choose between clipless pedals and suspension... I'd choose clipless pedals. And I ride some rough trails. I've run all the black diamond runs at Mammouth mountain but I don't consider myself one of those x-treme mountain bikers you see on the videos. I just like to ride.

 

george

 

george

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quote:
Originally posted by Jamie Z:

... he insisted that no person in their right mind would put clipless pedals on a mountain bike. I've tried to convince him that people do it, but he thinks it's nuts.

 

What do you have to say about that?


 

Jamie, I agree with George above. Clipless rocks on the trails! There are significant advantages to clipless pedals, especially in the rough stuff. I'm not a very technical rider, but having my feet attached to my pedals helps to keep them in place instead of bouncing off them. As with road cycling, "pedaling in circles" (applying power throughout the entire crank revolution) means more efficient and smoother climbing, less breaking of traction. I don't ride full-suspension but I do use a suspension seatpost. This allows me to remain in contact with my saddle when powering up those steep and rough trails. One more point is that clipless pedals typically provide more clearance than caged pedals. The bottom line is I doubt I would ever ride without clipless pedals, even in Winter.

 

As far as being scary ... that only lasts a little while if you aren't used to them. Never had a problem getting out of them in a crash, and some cases it's actually even safer to stay clipped in and remain with the bike in a tumble.

 

Cheers ...

 

~Rich in NEPA~

 

1132_1200.jpg

 

=== A man with a GPS receiver knows where he is; a man with two GPS receivers is never sure. ===

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My brother and I were marking some trails for a race saturday and he had his GPS tracklog on the whole time. When we got home, we compared the track log from walking, to a track log preveasly made while riding. There was a BIG defference! The riding log was all jagged edges, cut corners, ect. While the log made while walking showed all the tight turns ect. Obviasly the GPS isn't that accurate while riding on mtb trails. For the road however, it would be great!

 

The Mountain Bike Guy.

17228_200.jpg

Long Live Long Rides!

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Thanks for the replies regarding clipless pedals on a mountain bike. I'll never convince my friend, but at least now I have an idea. Sounds much the same as the advantages of clipless on my roadbike.

 

I have another question, though. I, too have a suspension seat post, and I notice that when I pedal, the suspension on my seat post bounces up and down slightly with every revolution. This seems to indicate that I have some inefficiencey in my pedaling and some of my energy is being wasted by moving my body up and down. If I concentrate real hard, I can pedal smoothly enough to make the bouncing stop, but it's not a style that I can keep up for a long time without making an effort.

 

My question is... should I practice pedaling so that it's smooth? Maybe my seat height is incorrect. Maybe the slight bounce is not something to worry about.

 

I'm not sure who to ask, but if some of you cyclists are more experienced than I, you might be aware of this phenomenon and whether it's normal, or if it should be corrected with proper technique or equipment adjustment.

 

Jamie

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quote:
Originally posted by Jamie Z:

My question is... should I practice pedaling so that it's smooth? Maybe my seat height is incorrect. Maybe the slight bounce is not something to worry about.


 

Jamie, I do not experience the bouncing you talk about, which leads me to suspect perhaps a seat height problem. Don't forget that there will be some sag in the seatpost when you are sitting on it. If you set up your height unloaded, you may want to check it while you are seated normally. Also, if your seatpost relies on elastomers for compression, they may be old and worn out. (I replaced the elastomers in my original RockShox seatpost with the titanium spring from a broken USE seatpost.) If this doesn't help, I suppose it's possible that you have poor pedaling technique. Someone else may be able to offer a solution here. In my case I've always had my feet attached to my pedals, even when road cycling years ago with toe clips and straps, so the "pedaling in circles" motion is second nature. Cheers ...

 

~Rich in NEPA~

 

1132_1200.jpg

 

=== A man with a GPS receiver knows where he is; a man with two GPS receivers is never sure. ===

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Rich,

 

The seatpost is only a few months old, so I doubt it's worn out. I tightened the spring in it one time, and that seemed to help.

 

I really think it's pedaling technique and possibly my seat is a bit too high. I lowered it a few millimeters a few weeks ago, and I noticed that the bouncing was significantly diminished, but not eliminated.

 

I'll have to practice and concentrate on pedaling in circles, something which I don't instictively do.

 

Jamie

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quote:
Originally posted by Jamie Z:

I'll have to practice and concentrate on pedaling in circles, something which I don't instinctively do.


Like most other physical activities, it takes mental concentration from the beginning until you develop an automatic "muscle memory" for the motion. I don't think you can get pedaling on the trails as smooth as you could on pavement. I've seen a couple of different schools of thought on the technique. Ideally, you want to apply power to the cranks with both legs evenly throughout the entire revolution. This is much easier on smooth terrain.

 

icon_wink.gif Trust me!

 

Cheers ...

 

~Rich in NEPA~

 

1132_1200.jpg

 

=== A man with a GPS receiver knows where he is; a man with two GPS receivers is never sure. ===

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Rich,

 

I'm not afraid of clipless, that's my friend. I think clipless are the best thing since geocaching.

 

I've got several good books on cycling, and Ned Overland's name is mentioned more than once in them.

 

I might check out his MTB video... I like the triangles thought.

 

Jamie

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quote:
Originally posted by Jamie Z:

_I'm_ not afraid of clipless, that's my friend.


 

Sorry, Jamie ... I meant "you" in the editorial sense. Do check out the video, though. Ned is famous for his simple and concise approach to teaching. Although their riding is noteworthy, the only very minor downside to the film is the brief instructional commentaries by one or two of the guest riders. Greg Herbold, as is usually the case with him, is superb.

 

Cheers ...

 

~Rich in NEPA~

 

1132_1200.jpg

 

=== A man with a GPS receiver knows where he is; a man with two GPS receivers is never sure. ===

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We actually have a lot of nice bike path's in the Ottawa region.Some very nice paved trails in parks and other. There is even some places where you can lease a bike for the day or have your's repaired. We also have a some caches on a few of them. I haven't logged them in yet but i'll get to them soon. 300mag

 

742_200.jpg

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I have my GPS mounted on by mountain bike and have used it to navigate the numerous trails in my area. Recently I have been introduced to Geocaching and now I plan my rides to include looking for caches.

 

[This message was edited by TahoeJoe on June 03, 2002 at 01:18 PM.]

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I did a few caches this weekend that were on bike friendly trails and noted them in the logs I posted. One of them I was wishing I had a bike because it was 1.8 miles down a closed road. I could've knocked it off quicker and gotten in another that day.

 

No Matter Where You Go... There You Are...

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I wrote up two virtual caches in a North Carolina State Park that are on a bike/bridal trail:

 

Umstead Park - Memorial Day Weekend 2002

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.asp?ID=23533

 

Hey Boo Boo, Is That A Picanic Basket?

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.asp?ID=23531

 

Regarding clips - after years of road riding with clips and no mishaps, I recently began riding a trail bike and have rolled it twice with the road rash to prove it. I couldn't get my feet disengaged. The second roll down the face of an earth dam with my feet still clipped was actually kind of fun though embarassing.

 

When faced with two choices, consider the third.

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Never cached by bike but I would if the opportunity presented itself. As an aside I ride a rigid mt. bike with toe straps (much cheaper than clipless). I have always wondered why people who extol the virtues of clipless pedals (i.e. no wasted motion, more efficient etc.) will install them on full suspension mountain bikes. They make more sense on road bikes or rigid mountain bikes where their advantage can be used to it's fullest. But then the biking world has never been about functionality. It's all style, baby. icon_wink.gif

 

"There's no need to be afraid of strange noises in the night. Anything that intends you harm will stalk you silently."

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quote:
Originally posted by Geo Quest:

I have always wondered why people who extol the virtues of clipless pedals (i.e. no wasted motion, more efficient etc.) will install them on full suspension mountain bikes. They make more sense on road bikes or rigid mountain bikes where their advantage can be used to it's fullest. But then the biking world has never been about functionality. It's all style, baby. icon_wink.gif


 

The biggest benifit to clipless is safety. It keeps your feet in when the need to be and lets them go when they need to be free. Even when riding a F/S bike you can't sit through all the rough stuff. You do have to stand on the pedals through the roughest stuff and clipless keep your feet firmly attached. Straps do that but it is a LOT harder to get out of straps than clipless. After riding clipless for a while, it becomes a subconcious action to get out of the pedels. If you tighten straps enough to really hold your feet well, they become really hard to get out of.

 

george

 

Remember: Half the people you meet are below average.

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quote:
Originally posted by Geo Quest:

Never cached by bike but I would if the opportunity presented itself. As an aside I ride a rigid mt. bike with toe straps (much cheaper than clipless). I have always wondered why people who extol the virtues of clipless pedals (i.e. no wasted motion, more efficient etc.) will install them on full suspension mountain bikes. They make more sense on road bikes or rigid mountain bikes where their advantage can be used to it's fullest. But then the biking world has never been about functionality.

 

i've worked in 2 bike shops over 7 years, raced Cat4 Road (crits mostly), Expert-MTB-racer, former bike courier in DC, toured the east coast, and Italy solo by bike...

 

and going clipless- regardless of your bike's suspension or your terrain is the primary upgrade, in my opinion.

 

Even before front forx were std. equipment, I'd recommend clip-less pedals before susp. upgrades/add-ons.

 

Like G said: if your clip/straps are tight enough to do any real good- you cannot get out of them quickly.

 

Clipless (whether one of the many mechanical/tension based models or the position based-release- like the Speedplay frogs- that I use) are much safer: both so that

 

1) your feet stay on the pedal when you want

2) your feet come off the pedal when you want

 

something mutually exclusive with clips/straps.

 

whether you want

 

1) circles/triangle/just-pulling-up in your pedal stroke;

2) for your bike to 'come with you' when you jump (assuming you don't have BMX pedal-tension skills and bear-trap pedals) whether it's a log or an unseen storm grate with the 'grooves' parallel to your travel path...

 

clipless is the answer.

 

yes not cheap, but your interface with your bike (pedals/shoes, saddle, grips/gloves) are real important in my eyes...

 

oh, and regarding FullSusp. (FS) bikes and clipless- i'd say the average FS user would need 'em more:

 

1) b/c of where they'll try and go with their 'bad-***' FS bike

2) when jumping an obstacle in a FS bike, one must 'preload' the susp. (by jumping up then DOWN) before jumping over your object- this exaggerated action to move a heavier/less rigid bike would take more pedal/shoe control than a lighter/stiffer hard-tail over the same object.

 

I've got 2 caches laid out in my head- both accessible by bike, and I'll note it on the description page...

 

edit: an addition that i forgot to mention: i've taken 2 friends to the hospital who, on different occaisions, got messed up b/c of the distraction of getting into their clipless pedals. They weren't even running them 'tight'- had one foot in, and were trying to get the other in when.... ooops. Very bad. Never seen anyone break a collar-bone, or get face-stiches and almost loose an eye whiel trying to get into clipless pedals- if they're in the right spot, you just press down 'extra' on your first downstroke, and go (the position/Frogs take foot rotation - for 'going in thru the out door', but same idea)

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quote:
Originally posted by MTBguy:

....does anybody else goecache with a fully ridged single-speed mountain bike with clipless pedals? I just built a SS with a Schwinn Frontier frame.

 

The Mountain Bike Guy.

http://img.Groundspeak.com/user/17228_200.jpg

Long Live Long Rides!


 

I just transfer my pedels to it when I ride it. I just don't ride it that often. I'm not in good enough shape anymore to ride it at my usual spots.

 

george

 

Remember: Half the people you meet are below average.

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I also have to switch my pedels between my Trek 6500 and my SS. I am hoping to do some racing on my SS this year.

 

MTBguy (still sweaty from a ride on his single-speed bike) icon_razz.gif

 

quote:
Originally posted by georgeandmary:

 

I just transfer my pedels to it when I ride it. I just don't ride it that often. I'm not in good enough shape anymore to ride it at my usual spots.

 

george

 


 

The Mountain Bike Guy.

17228_200.jpg

Long Live Long Rides!

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where do you think the name "hakalugi" came from? icon_smile.gif (http://www.ibiscycles.com/products/bikes/road/hakkalugi/photos/)

 

but i shortened it to 8 characters for simplicity...

 

i bought it in '97/98 for my tour of italy... since then, i've sold my last Klein (F/S) my Ibis Alibi hardtail with amp fork, and even my carbon-fiber road bike.

 

this one does it all.

 

(it does have a flexstem though icon_wink.gif

 

i'm looking forward to marking my caches with: "bike friendly (or not)" icons so that riders can know if they can get there or not.

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