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While geocaching in Maryland, I am constantly finding ticks on me when coming back from the cache hunt. Is there anything I can do to prevent them from touching me in the first place? Will longer pants keep them off, or can they crawl up my leg/pounce on my arms? Any sort of bug spray that I can spray on me? Any help would be appreciated icon_smile.gif

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You know, I have been reading a lot of stuff on the forums about this after posting, and I have come to a couple conclusions:

  • Lyme disease is a REALLY BAD disease to catch
  • No matter what, there is no true way to prevent getting the disease
  • I may actually stop geocaching for a while, because I REALLY REALLY don't want to get Lyme Disease.
My immune system is already lowered due to some prescription drugs I'm taking, and I really don't want to get it. Maybe the Geocachers out there can reassure me icon_frown.gif
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I can understand your frustration with ticks, I share in your misery. Although I have yet to try this, a few other cachers highly recommend treating a few articles of clothing with permethrin. Use these clothes only to cache in and nothing else. Insect repellants can be used that contain deet.

 

Other practical things to keep in mind:

Wear long pants and tuck them into your socks. Also wear long sleeeved shirts and tuck them in your pants as well. You basically want to eliminate as many places for them to enter as possible. They will not attach themselves through clothing. Wear a hat also. Check yourself as often as possible. Once home, strip, search and shower. If you are with others, it makes best sense to check each others heads to make sure none are hiding in your hair. The head gives off heat which is one thing the tick looks for, a warm place to attach itself.

 

One other thing...avoid tall grass/weeds (if) you can.

 

Is that a labrador I see icon_smile.gif Check him/her VERY well if you take her out with you to hunt.

 

Good Luck...Kar

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If I've said this once, I've said it a hundred times...

 

the best way to keeps dicks off of you is to dress appropriatly.

 

Once a dick touches you, then you must squeeze the little bugger between you thumb and forefinger. If you reguire dick removal (God help you) then grasp the dadgum thing with your tweezers and give it a good yank until the dadgum thing comes off.

 

Don't use the chemical sprays, they only make your dick itch like hell. Now, if by chance you notice more than one dick on you, then you have got another issue to deal with! Call your Doctor as soon as possible.

 

Again, the best way to avoid dicks is to stay out of the bars and away from places that play loud music. Also, don't listen to me either, I've had the Lime soda and it tasted like crap, go with the grape soda instead.

 

"heck, that scares me and I'm fearless"

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There are some very lightweight pants that are comfortable in the summer and tough enough to get you through thick brush. Something like this , this

or this.

 

For complete protection, wear light colored clothing, so you can see the buggers as soon as they jump on, tuck your pants into your socks (high geek factor here) and wear a peremthrin based repellent (such as Duranon, or Permanone) on your clothing and a DEET based repellent (Off! Repel, Cutter, Ultrathon, etc...) on your skin.

 

"Au pays des aveugles, les borgnes sont rois"

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No Tick problems yet, here in Detroit Mich. I have done 100 caches, but no ticks.

 

Maybe Geocaching is becoming really hazzardous.

 

Maybe we should try Geo-Cashing:

Geo-Cashing is the art of hiding cash in banks all over, then marking the waypoints to these cashes(Banks). You Give the teller the waypoint, and a password, then the bank teller grabs for you a rubbermaid container full of cash, from under the counter. Sign the logbook, then trade some cash. This will keep us out of the dangerous outdoors.

 

As recent as 1998, I hiked in the North Eastern USA, with no problems, and no knowlege of this dang tick problem. I use to do Outdoor activies all the time, but things are changing.

 

--------------------------------------------------

My Old posts as Geoffrey

My Current Post as GOT GPS?

My profile

My Home Page about what is GPS

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I picked up Lyme Disease at a 4th of July barbecue in the Oregon Ridge area of northern Baltimore County, Maryland. They say that is one of the areas of the state with the worst Lyme problems, maybe because of people living in heavily wooded areas also frequented by lots of hikers, in proximity to deer. My hosts at the barbecue also picked up Lyme Disease that day. My case of Lyme was apparently so nasty that my doctor took pictures of me for her medical students icon_eek.gif So I share your fear of ticks.

 

I admit that I don't always tuck my shirts and pants in, though. I do wear bug repellent though - some stuff called Cactus Juice that also works as sunscreen (in fact it is sold as sunscreen) and doesn't smell nasty. I also shower and check carefully for ticks, including my scalp, as soon as I get home. I'm happy to say (knock on wood) that I haven't had a tick since then. So, basically, it can be done - you just have to take extra precautions.

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All the comments about long pants and deet etc. are right.

 

I don't worry about ticks a whole lot in Nebraska because we have only had one ever reported lyme case in the state. West Nile is a bigger concern here lately. Still, I do wear deet when I go out and check myself and my dog when I get home.

 

pokeanim3.gif

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The ticks are thriving here in the Tennessee as well. Luckily none of us have found any on us, but our friend's new puppy had 14(and counting) on it.

 

As for your 120+ lb lab being too wild, I feel your pain! The one pictured in my icon is my fiance's as well. He weighed 98 lbs at last vet appt, and is way way way too hyper to go hiking with us. He was never taught to walk on a leash very well. He pulls like an Alaskan sled dog.

 

My time, your time is limited, but time itself is unlimited.

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Off subject here but you folks who are having trouble with your dogs should check out the following link.

http://www.gentleleader.com/pages.cfm?id=17

 

These collars work wonders for a dog that pulls. I just got a new dog and this collar allows me to take my dog caching all the time. He is a great dog and loves to cache with us.

 

Geocaching will get you through times of no money....Better than money will get you through times of no Geocaching!

Flat_MiGeo_A88.gif

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Better yet, if those dogs are more than 6 months old - OBEDIENCE TRAINING!

 

My wife is a professional dog trainer. Time and time again I have seen wild uncontrolable dogs transformed in just 10 weeks to a well-behaved family member. The dog WANTS to be your friend and do everything the way you like it. You need to teach the dog. A good obedience teacher will show you how to make that connection between you and the dog.

 

The dog in my avatar was trained by me, under the direction of either my wife or other instructors at the kennel. I am not a dog show person. But dispite my mistakes, this dog earned an AKC title in obedience. Whats more, he is so well behaved that he has been adopted by the state park as the mascott. He is the only dog allowed in the park off leash. They made him a tag with a park ranger patch on it, it gets clipped to his collar when he hikes in the park.

 

As pointed out in previous posts... I do not need to mark a waypoint to pick up his doots, they are visible from space. I do carry plastic -WAL-MART- bags. They are just about the right size.

 

And just to stay on topic... there ain't no ticks in these mountains. Too dry I guess.

 

I enjoy hiking with a good dog more than just about anything else.

 

Mike. Desert_Warrior (aka KD9KC).

El Paso, Texas.

 

Citizens of this land may own guns. Not to threaten their neighbors, but to ensure themselves of liberty and freedom.

 

They are not assault weapons anymore... they are HOMELAND DEFENSE WEAPONS!

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I feel bad for us taking over the tick post. icon_confused.gif

 

Its not that our dog is not trained. He has been to 2 obediance classes(multiple sessions). He actually won best in class at the last one. icon_wink.gif Its just that he is very very hyper when he walks. The smells drive him crazy. He listens to us very well all other times. Sits, lays, takes treats very well when we ask him. He doesnt tear up the house or anything, and is great inside, as he is an indoor dog. He is especially good in public. When he goes to the vet, or to other public places, he is nearly perfect, but when we walk him, he is a tugging machine.

 

Ive read some short books, and guides, on training him to walk nicely but since Im not around him 24/7 yet, its hard for me to try these techniques. That website looks to be helpful. Im going to check it out more.

 

My time, your time is limited, but time itself is unlimited.

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quote:
Originally posted by carleenp:

I don't worry about ticks a whole lot in Nebraska because we have only had one ever reported lyme case in the state. West Nile is a bigger concern here lately. Still, I do wear deet when I go out and check myself and my dog when I get home.


 

You are right, we don't have Lyme to a great extent, do have it in Nebraska and Iowa. Also have Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and Ehrlichiosis, niether one is very much fun.

 

Ticks are booming around Omaha. Found 4 last weekend between the caches in Elkhorn, Wahoo, Ceresco and Lincoln.

 

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/nebraskache/

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Having been "outdoorsy" my entire life, and having had every family member contract Lyme, I took all the steps.

 

As the doctor said when he figured out I had Lyme, "The tick probably walked past the Deet areas until he found a spot he liked."

 

I used to carry 30% Deep Woods Off in the trunk of the car and fully spray and spread all exposed skin. Guess where the bite was?

 

Now, I rely more on intelligence--I won't spray so they'll attach in a visible spot. Long pants are great for seeing them marching up your pant legs. Grassy areas are the most likely areas to get them on you, and if you walk frontwards, they'll end up on the front of your legs! If you don't roll in the fields like a puppy, it's highly unlikely you'll find them above your knees (unless they've marched all the way up).

 

Lyme disease is EASILY curable if caught EARLY. If you're getting ANY weird flu-like symptoms, bite or no, in summer, get checked out! I went to the top Doc for Lyme in CT, and he didn't even do a test (the accuracy is so low, time for results so great, it's not worth the cost)--you'd start a month-long course of antibiotics regardless!

 

So my tactic is to remove them immediately (when I leave a field for another terrain I tick-check my legs), not worry otherwise, if symptoms get to the Doc immediately.

 

I've known people with advanced Lyme and you DON'T want it--you'll never go caching again (not even legitimate 1/1's).

 

(This is not to dissuade taking additional steps, but to share how to incorporate safe practices into lifestyle.)

 

Hope this helps,

 

Randy (Lyme-survivor!)

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quote:
Also have Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and Ehrlichiosis, niether one is very much fun.

 

Ticks are booming around Omaha. Found 4 last weekend between the caches in Elkhorn, Wahoo, Ceresco and Lincoln.


 

I hadn't really considered some of the other nasy things ticks carry. I haven't seen any around Lincoln yet, and the dog hasn't got one yet, but I'm sure it is just a matter of time!

 

pokeanim3.gif

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Ticks are abundant up here. Had one on me the other day. Was on my upper arm and not on my legs. So they are capable of getting on you higher than above the knees. Bought some bug repellent called "Bens" I believe. It's in a little pump bottle. Spray it on you and rub it on good. Haven't had any ticks or mosquito bites since either.

 

Brian Wood

Woodsters Outdoors

http://www.woodsters.com

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Where's "up here"? I wish people would show where they live from their profile so it automatically displays at the bottom of the post. Would make life a lot easier for the rest of us and add meaning to what you have to say.

 

Sorry, but it's just a long-time gripe I've had.

 

Alan

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quote:
I haven't seen any around Lincoln yet,

 

Oh geeze, now I have to take that back! I visited a cache today in Lincoln and brushed a tick off my pants leg! It was an urban cache too!

 

quote:
Where's "up here"? I wish people would show where they live from their profile so it automatically displays at the bottom of the post. Would make life a lot easier for the rest of us and add meaning to what you have to say.

Sorry, but it's just a long-time gripe I've had.


 

Yeah. I think many people either (1) don't know about setting up the profile; (2) didn't think of that concern, or; (3) want to be somewhat private.

 

Anyway, to readers: Consider editing your profile to show your location!

 

pokeanim3.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by Team Shibby:

Long pants is not just for the ticks! I take it you have never waded through a field of Stinging Nettles, Poison Ivy and sticker bushes!! Ouch!!

 

Kar


I just discovered my too expensive quick-dry, breathable caching pants don't protect against nettles icon_frown.gif

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We are from the Tulsa area. My 8 1/2 year old daughter is on antibiotics for tick related stuff. She has had many ticks on her - and has probably pulled some off herself, rather than having someone else with experience do it - and she broke out in a rash on her shoulder and neck and around her eye. When the kids get it, it sure takes all the fun out of it. The doctor did blood work, but it takes a week to get it back. Luckily, the doc was smart enough to go ahead and get thing rolling.

 

We can't stress Deet enough and the peremthrin. It's not worth risking your life or health to go without it. And, the pediatrician said that the 100% Deet wasn't going to hurt her, of course, we have to use our common sense on it.

 

So, only Virtuals for our 8 1/2 year old and 2 year old until the weather changes the the stupid ticks are gone.

 

I've had lime before, but caught it very early and turned out fine (well, everyone is entitled to their own opinion).

 

"Nice find! I must go tell Harry, Ron and Hermione."

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quote:
Originally posted by Alan2:

Where's "up here"? I wish people would show where they live from their profile so it automatically displays at the bottom of the post. Would make life a lot easier for the rest of us and add meaning to what you have to say.

 

Sorry, but it's just a long-time gripe I've had.

 

Alan


 

I've read some post that location would give some meaning to. also when an out of town cacher finds your cache it makes it more interesting.

 

Had one tick on me so far this year. Think it fell out of a tree on to my arm. Had long paints on and had sprayed my shoes and paints leg.

 

Mejas

 

Love caching

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quote:
Originally posted by Alan2:

Where's "up here"? I wish people would show where they live from their profile so it automatically displays at the bottom of the post. Would make life a lot easier for the rest of us and add meaning to what you have to say.

 

Sorry, but it's just a long-time gripe I've had.

 

Alan


 

I'm sorry I did have my location in my profile, but just realized thgere were two places for it and apparantly didn't have it in the one that counted... It's there now.. My location is Lunenburg, Massachusetts...

 

Brian Wood

Woodsters Outdoors

http://www.woodsters.com

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I've read that if you do find a tick that is attached to you. Pull it off by grasping it as close to the skin as possible with a fine tweezers. Then save it in a sealed container with a small ball of moist paper towel in the container. Lastly put the container in the fridge to keep the tick alive and save for 30 to 45 days. If you develop flu-like symptoms during this time, immediately see your doctor and take the tick with you to have it tested. You should NOT attempt to remove a tick by burning or putting grease on it to suffocate it, as these methods do not work.

 

Michael J. Campion

Check out my completely useless homepage

Click here -> http://mywebpages.comcast.net/mjcampion/

quote:
Oh, Great Spirit, let us greet the dawn of a new day when all men live as brothers and peace reigns everywhere!

 

[This message was edited by iBrew on June 20, 2003 at 12:13 PM.]

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Thanks Brian for adding you location. See that. Now that I know that I can tell you my wife and I will be visiting Mass in August on vacation. Not near Lunenburg, (Cod Cod and Hyannisport) but even though I feel closer to ya already. icon_smile.gif

 

Thanks to every one else who added their location too.

 

Alan

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quote:
Originally posted by Sugar Kane:

Does anyone know any more about this?


 

There was a very LENGTHY thread covering tick removal that perhaps someone could Markwell rather than repeating those discussions here...

 

There wasn't a good conclusion. One indicating using a straw to loop thread as close to the mouthparts as possible and extra the tick was the only way to prevent "regurgitation". Tweezers, the ol' petroleum jelly, alcohol/cotton & twist, and fire were all discussed with varying levels of exposure attributed to each.

 

My practical result? Whatever is easiest at the time! If camping, my fingernails will suffice. If out caching, flick 'em off the pants unless a smoker is handy w/a lighter to burn it. If returned home, tweezers are my fastest/easiest option.

 

When I got Lyme, the tick/bite was totally undetected. Afterward the bite was itchy, but not otherwise notable beyond any other bite.

 

There are NUMEROUS websites offering various tick removal methods, a quick Google search will offer more than you want...

 

Hope this helps, and please don't life a fear-based life (or teach it to your kids)!

 

Enjoy,

 

Randy

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I have had ticks attach themselves to me twice. In those two times neither of them got fully attached by the time I found them, so I yanked them off and immediatley applied rubbing alcohol to the bite site. I will always keep the tick, just in case the bullseye rash appears or any other symptoms of Lyme show.

 

While I am hiking or caching and I find one walking up my pants, I burn em off with a cigarette lighter. I put an end to their miserable lives, I don't flick em off and give them another chance at life like I would do for a spider I find in the house.

 

Kar

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quote:
Originally posted by carleenp:

quote:
Also have Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and Ehrlichiosis, niether one is very much fun.

 

Ticks are booming around Omaha. Found 4 last weekend between the caches in Elkhorn, Wahoo, Ceresco and Lincoln.


 

I hadn't really considered some of the other nasy things ticks carry. I haven't seen any around Lincoln yet, and the dog hasn't got one yet, but I'm sure it is just a matter of time!

 

http://outbreakcorp.hypermart.net/animation/pokemon/pokeanim3.gif


 

Five Ticks today at Boyer Chute. One bite. Keeping an eye on it.

 

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/nebraskache/

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Excellent thread! This is what boards are about.

 

Have to share my story....

Went on a cache hunt today in MN, and while sitting in my car, I saw a big red tick crawling on my arm. Flicked it off before I thought. So if I stop posting in a few days, you'll know where I am. X(

 

=====

It is the tale, not he who tells it."

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PROPER TICK REMOVAL -

 

Many industrial and wilderness first aid organizations (I am a First Aid Instructor for OFA, OEC, Red Cross) recommend using a short piece of straw with a piece of thread tied around the straw with a overhand knot (as if you were starting to tie your shoes).

 

Slide the straw under the ticks body so that it is pushing against the ticks mouth (with the tick inside the straw).

 

Slide the thread down the straw until it comes off at the bottom.

 

Slowly tighten the thread using the straw to guide it around the front of the ticks head.

 

Tighten the knot gently and pull up on the thread hard enough to cause the skin to lift slightly.

 

Maintain this pressure until the tick lets go. If the tick has not let go in about one minute - increase the pull and wait another minute.

 

This is the only method that will not cause a tick to possible vomit into your underlying tissue.

 

Happy Tick Hunting!

 

I want to die like my grandfather did, peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming and yelling like the passengers in his car.

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quote:
I thought that removing a tick with tweezers would cause it to leave its mouthparts in you, which somehow increases the risk of Lyme infection. I had heard that the right method is to smother the tick with an alcohol-soaked cotton ball. Does anyone know any more about this?

 

The above straw method is a good one. Tweezers are also a recommended method, but you have to be careful not to grab the tick by its body. Grab it by its neck and gently rock it back and forth while pulling it. It will eventually come loose. Some outdoors stores also sell specialized tick removal devices.

 

Other methods such as covering in Vaseline, alcohol, using a lighter, or lit cigarette are not good ideas. They either don't work, or may cause the tick to regurgitate into your bloodstream. Not a good thing if you are trying to prevent disease transmission.

 

"Au pays des aveugles, les borgnes sont rois"

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quote:
Originally posted by SkydiverBC:

 

I want to die like my grandfather did, peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming and yelling like the passengers in his car.

 


 

Okay, this is the funniest signature I've seen. LOL!!! I have a 90 yr old granfather that I love dearly, and I can definitetly relate.

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