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Another boot question


magellan315
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Try LL Bean. They have very good hiking boots and a liberal return policy. If they don't fit send them back on their dollar. The Cresta Hikers have had some excellent reviews, including an Editors Choice award in Backpacker magazine.

 

"You can't make a man by standing a sheep on its hind legs, but by standing a flock of sheep in that position, you can make a crowd of men" -Max Beerbohm

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quote:
Originally posted by magellan315:

I'm hoping someone can look at http://www.bassproshops.com and see if they are familiar with any of the brands they carry. As none of them seem to turn up on the thread Markwell pointed me towards.


 

I checked out the site, and was not too impressed with their selection. Based on what they carry, I would go with either the Merrell or Vasque brands (whichever feels more comfortable to you). I wear Montrails and have been very pleased with them.

 

Try them on with the socks you're planning on wearing hiking. Also, if possible, try them on in the afternoon. Feet tend to be larger then.

 

-Mark

 

Elvis is dead. Get over it.

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quote:
Originally posted by magellan315:

I'm facing a few addtional challenges, I have a small foot, often I have have to buy sneakers in womens sizes to find a good fit. So its crucial that I try to on before I buy it.

I'm hoping someone can look at http://www.bassproshops.com and see if they are familiar with any of the brands they carry. As none of them seem to turn up on the thread Markwell pointed me towards.


 

Both my husband and I have Vasque Sundowners that we bought at least 8 years ago. They're strudy, comfortable, and rugged. He has the suede; I have leather, so I can speak for both types.

 

--

wcgreen

Wendy Chatley Green

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I looked at the Bassoproshops selection. Not a great one, but Danner, Vasque and Merrill all make quality boots. Merrill tends to fit a narrower foot, so that may be the way to go. Stay away from Timberland. Their quality isn't what it was 20 years ago. I've never heard of Redhead and have no experience with Columbia hiking boots. I agree that the Sundowner is a great all around boot for the money. Also, IMHO, the BPS prices aren't too good. You might want to go there, try on a boot and if you like it, look for it online at a place like www.sierratradingpost.com (for price) or www.campmor.com(for selection).

"You can't make a man by standing a sheep on its hind legs, but by standing a flock of sheep in that position, you can make a crowd of men" -Max Beerbohm

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I appreciate everyones input on this, I had been seriously considering Timberland. But the last pair I had was about 20 years ago.

Given the swampy terrain of Florida someone had recommended that I get mil-spec jungle boots. Right now I'm using cheap knock off jungle boots, even with double pairs of socks I'm getting some blisters. Otherwise they have been great when moving through shin deep mud and water. I'm hoping the mil-spec version will be better made and reduce the blister factor.

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quote:
Originally posted by magellan315:

My options are Sports Authority and Bass Pro Shops, neither of which have very knowledgeable staff.


I can't help much with boots (I've been wearing a pair of light-hiking Rocky's. I paid about $100 and they've suited me very well. Huh.. maybe I can offer some advice.

 

I bought my Rocky's about 2.5 years ago in preparation for a canoe trip. They needed to be light because I would be packing them much of the way. I also had very little need for big thick tread. These have a very light sole, but are perfect for the terrain I hike in. I don't climb mountains, but I often walk through the woods or on gravel, or in water. These are perfect for that, and they've lasted me longer than I figured they would, given that for about a year, they were my only footwear.

 

Anyway, the reason I responded is that like you, I have little more than Bass Pro Shops and Sports Authority around here to choose my sporting goods. And in this region, Sporting goods means hunting and fishing. Unfortunatly neither store has a very wide selection of hiking boots (or other hiking/camping equipment, for that matter). We've got a couple of specialty outdoors stores in Memphis that employ very knowledgable and enthusiastic people. Their stuff is more expensive, and the selection is small, but what they have is usually the best. Maybe you have a similar store around you. Ask, or look around.

 

Jamie

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In the late 1960s the US Army and Marine Corps found out that the boots that were excellent in most of the USA did not work well in the wet swampy conditions of Vietnam. The Vibram soles that were terrific on rocky mountains and hills of this country, filled with mud quickly and made for slippery conditions.

 

The two of us use top quality LL Bean boots. Boots that do not let water in unless it gets over the top. This was another problem in Vietnam, once the water got in, it would not go out.

 

I have never hiked in Florida, but my impression is that there are many areas that the conditions are close to what Vietnam is. I think it would be helpful if you told us more about the type of terrain that you hike in, before I would say anything about boots.

 

The wife agrees with BrianSnat, she loves her Cresta boots. I am sorry, I do not know the name of my model and I can not find it listed on www.llbean.com.

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quote:
Given the swampy terrain of Florida someone had recommended that I get mil-spec jungle boots. Right now I'm using cheap knock off jungle boots, even with double pairs of socks I'm getting some blisters

 

The problem with military jungle boots (or most military stuff), is that they are a compromise. They have to be inexpensive and durable. Comfort is not one of the primary criteria. The boots are made to fit the widest range of people, meaning that they don't fit many individuals especially well.

 

You will find some people who swear by them, but most of these people will be those who are lucky enough to get a good fit. Most others swear at them.

 

I still recommend that you go to a local shop, look for a brand that fits and look for that brand online. Most boots made by one manufacturer will have a similar fit.

 

"You can't make a man by standing a sheep on its hind legs, but by standing a flock of sheep in that position, you can make a crowd of men" -Max Beerbohm

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Know that Briansnat mentions it I do have to agree with him about quality and military issue. I did a military tradeshow this fall and heard the adage, the best quality product made by the lowest bidder.

Took a look at Danner boots online and they appear to be more of what I am looking for. I'll have to look around the area and see what I can find in a smaller specialized store.

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I just picked up a pair of THESE

They are real inexpensive and after wearing them, I'm impressed. They provide nearly the support of a full hiking boot, in a low cut, sneaker type shoe.

 

OK, so they're ugly...that's probably why they are so cheap...but they are functional!

 

"You can't make a man by standing a sheep on its hind legs, but by standing a flock of sheep in that position, you can make a crowd of men" -Max Beerbohm

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