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Gluing magnets to 35mm cannisters


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Of the caches I've hidden, the most popular are sign-only microcaches

that are in 35mm film cannisters.

 

I have a variety of ways of placing the cannisters, and one I like --

that I first encountered in a GeorgeandMary cache -- involves gluing

magnets to the cannister and then putting the cannister along side

something metal. (Another variant is to use those hide-a-key tins)

 

My problem is that the magnets are not staying on. I've tried CA

glues (superglue) and do sand the surfaces first, but after a while

the flexibility of the can causes the magnet to pop loose.

 

Anybody have a clue as to how to keep the magnets stuck? Will hot glue

or epoxy work better?

 

Thanks,

 

Marty

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I've used one of the heavy duty round magnets before. It was the same size as the canister so it was a snug fit without having to glue it. The magnet was strong enough to hold thru the canister. Biggest problem was magnet was almost half inch thick so it limited the space in the canister. Something else that works besides magnets is heavy duty adhesive velcro strips. Attach one strip all the way around the canister and the other to the sign, park bench, whatever you're using.

 

Mitsuko was nice clean-cut Joisy Girl. She's moved on now. We can let her go now.

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Lemme see if I can find a link... Household Goop

 

The URL for the manufacturer page doesn't work, but this describes it. It is like super glue, except a little softer and goopier. icon_smile.gif

 

I use it to glom speaker wires down to the floorboards, as well as to coat the backs of little miniatures that I install into covert applications.

 

Good stuff - can be had at most hobby shops.

 

Rubbertoe - Webcam - Image Archives

--== http://www.bigfoot.com/~rbatina ==--

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Lemme see if I can find a link... Household Goop

 

The URL for the manufacturer page doesn't work, but this describes it. It is like super glue, except a little softer and goopier. icon_smile.gif

 

I use it to glom speaker wires down to the floorboards, as well as to coat the backs of little miniatures that I install into covert applications.

 

Good stuff - can be had at most hobby shops.

 

Rubbertoe - Webcam - Image Archives

--== http://www.bigfoot.com/~rbatina ==--

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For one of my caches, I needed to place three microcaches. I first used the following metallic "pill" boxes from the Container STore.

262333_200.jpg

It worked well because you could put the magnet inside, it would stick to the container without glue, and still hold the micro to a metal surface. The problem, as you can tell in the picture, is that they rust.

 

So I switched to acrylic "pill boxes" as shown below:

32523_6200.JPG

They've held out great against rust but clearly the magnet won't stick without glue. I used a two-part epoxy from Home Depot (~$1.50) and haven't had any problems. Like the previous post, I epoxy the magnet to the inside. One cool feature of these is that you can write on the inside (and/or paint) and since they're transparent, the design is protected on the inside of the container. These come in many sizes and have tight sealing screw tops.

 

I recommend the following magnets for this purpose. They are freakishly strong. They will hold any reasonably sized micro-cache (even with coins inside)

Lee Valley Hardware

99k3211s1.jpg

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I dunno, Marty - the concern I have about hot glue is that it doesn't seem to stick real well to plastic. They actually sell plastic mats to use under hot glue projects because the glue won't stick to it.

 

My suggestion is a little unorthodox, but how about clear silicone sealant? Either the fish tank type, or the clear home use type seems like it would work. You could use white, but it would show more.

 

We used to use it for bonding glass to glass, and metal to glass. It's made to stick to fiberglass and acrylic tubs, as well, so maybe it'll work.

 

Shannah

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If you are using epoxy, you might want to think about drilling a coupla holes in the film canister so that some of the epoxy "mushrooms" up into the hole. That way it works kinda like a rivet and you don't have to depend to much on the epoxy bonding to the plastic. icon_wink.gif

 

... Two roads diverged in a wood, and I--

I took the one less traveled by, ...

 

unclerojelio

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If you are using epoxy, you might want to think about drilling a coupla holes in the film canister so that some of the epoxy "mushrooms" up into the hole. That way it works kinda like a rivet and you don't have to depend to much on the epoxy bonding to the plastic. icon_wink.gif

 

... Two roads diverged in a wood, and I--

I took the one less traveled by, ...

 

unclerojelio

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The glue mentioned by "RubberToe" will work for sure. I used a different glue from the same company called "Shoe Goo" and it works better than any glue I have ever used.

 

It is meant for repairing shoes, so it sticks to virtually anything and resists water and high/low temps.

 

I used this glue to repair our pool cleaning bug (its a vaccum that scurries along the bottom of the pool) and this thing is submereged 24/7 under super heavy chlorinated water and its has not deteriorated or anything. Its as good as new!

 

I bought this glue at Kmart, but I am sure you can find it in most general merchandise chain stores or hardware stores.

 

Hope this helps...Kar (Team Shibby!)

 

TEAM SHIBBY!!!!

 

Krs, Kar & Na

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Start with the drill idea... drill through the center of the magnet and the bottom of the container (approx 1/8" hole) counter-sink (no, not kitchen sink!) the magnet and use the appropriate nut/bolt combo. It seems that everyone nowadays has a cordless drill laying around, and you can ask your local hardware store guy for the correct nuts-n-bolts, just bring in your container and show them what you want to do with it. Combine this with the goop/glue idea and you should have a magnetic cannister that's still waterproof.

 

If you're a do-it-yourselfer, but not mechanically inclined or don't want to deal with a hardware store person, drop me a line or post here and I'll make up some instructions with pictures. icon_razz.gif

 

------------------------

STURGEON GENERAL WARNING: Fishing can decrease the risk of long-term employment, a meaningful relationship, and any chance of financial independence... Oh well.

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Start with the drill idea... drill through the center of the magnet and the bottom of the container (approx 1/8" hole) counter-sink (no, not kitchen sink!) the magnet and use the appropriate nut/bolt combo. It seems that everyone nowadays has a cordless drill laying around, and you can ask your local hardware store guy for the correct nuts-n-bolts, just bring in your container and show them what you want to do with it. Combine this with the goop/glue idea and you should have a magnetic cannister that's still waterproof.

 

If you're a do-it-yourselfer, but not mechanically inclined or don't want to deal with a hardware store person, drop me a line or post here and I'll make up some instructions with pictures. icon_razz.gif

 

------------------------

STURGEON GENERAL WARNING: Fishing can decrease the risk of long-term employment, a meaningful relationship, and any chance of financial independence... Oh well.

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quote:
Originally posted by Marty Fouts:

Of the caches I've hidden, the most popular are sign-only microcaches

that are in 35mm film cannisters.

 

I have a variety of ways of placing the cannisters, and one I like --

that I first encountered in a GeorgeandMary cache -- involves gluing

magnets to the cannister and then putting the cannister along side

something metal. (Another variant is to use those hide-a-key tins)

 

Marty


 

They've never come off the film canisters, but I've had one pop off a painted altiods can. Plus hot glue is really easy to use and not at all messy. Make sure you use the HOT hot glue, there are two temps of glue available.

 

george

 

Remember: Half the people you meet are below average.

5867_200.gif

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Go to home depot get J.B.Weld "Better than bailing wire" make sure you scuff up both surfaces.You would be amazed at the stuff I have seen this stuff fix.There's probley not a auto tech in the country that don't have this stuff in their tool box.

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I solved my magnetic micro-cache problems in two ways:

 

#1 Switched to clear silicone sealant

#2 Glued the magnet to the bottom...not the lid.

 

Flexing the top to open it tends to make the magnet pop off if it is on the lid. After I glue the magnet on, I run a bead of glue around the edge of the disc to protect it even more.

 

So far, of the five caches that use the newer method, none have failed.

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I use a hobby epoxy.(hangar 9 is the brand I have currently but other amke it) I use a six minuit epoxy I get at my local hobbyshop that sells r/c airplanes. If that stuff can hold my rudder on during a snap-roll it will hold a magnet on a film can. It is also chemical and heat resistant.

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Why use glue at all! I'd try sandwidging the (flat disk?) magnet between two 1-inch wide strips of duck tape or shipping tape. Then, placing the magnet against the can bottom (or side) and folding the two ends of the tape sandwidge up (or around) the sides of the can, wrap more 1-inch tape a couple times around the can to hold it all together. How could that ever come loose!

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Two things:

 

Be careful with the epoxy you buy. Most of the 5 minute variety are water soluble.

 

My choice of glue for this project would be contact cement. Not rubber cement. It is flexible, non-messy, water-proof, and quick.

 

Another choice might be to forego the glue, and buy sone Blind poprivits, and some of the magnets with little holes in the middle.

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The best adhesive I know of is a polyurethane sealer-adhesive used in marine applications: 3M 5200. That stuff will stick to seaweed! It is tough, flexible, and tenacious. Look for it where boating supplies are sold.

 

Be warned, it does take several days to fully cure.

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Radio Shack sells a pair a neodymium "dot" magnets for about a buck and a half. They're a little smaller than the cross section of a normal pen and are very strong. They would seem to be ideal to glue to a 35mm cannister.

 

Also, it occurs to me that it would be possible to make a log-only cache using a 35mm cannister if one were able to find the correct width of register tape or rolled paper for a printing calculator.

 

Any thoughts?

 

-- t6 says: "Spiders taste like chicken".

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We bought a case of 44mm cash register rolls for around ten dollars. They are about the right size for a 35mm film canister. Each roll is 120 ft. long, so you can make up hundreds of micros. We hane started using M&M minis containers as they leave alittle more room for a longer pencil and the lid is attached. On occasion we leave a roll in a traditional cache so others can make their own micros.

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Exactly what I was going to recommend, 3M 5200 is a bit pricy but is weatherproof and waterproof and bulletproof!

Another bit of advice, it keeps longer if you put any unused portion in the freezer and let it come to room temp when you use it again.

You can get this stuff at West Marine, Boater's World, BoatUS, etc....

 

"I am umbilically connected to the temperate zone. It's brought me life. It's brought me love, I never have outgrown"----J. Buffett

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I'm not positive, but I think Office Depot carries a two-pack.

 

Back to the glue conversation...

 

Since this was originally discussed. I started using Goop for this purpose. They make 'Outdoor Goop' that stays flexible and holds up to temperature changes and UVs.

 

Whenever I feel blue, I start breathing again.

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Amazing GOOP failed more often than not when I tried using it to attach my Freakishly Strong Magnets (FSM). I have found that JB Weld works wonders fot attaching these things. That's my new FSM Adhesive of choice. I haven't had one of those fail yet.

 

- If the cat had kittens in the oven, we wouldn't call 'em biscuits. -

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quote:
Originally posted by bitbrain:

Amazing GOOP failed more often than not when I tried using it to attach my Freakishly Strong Magnets (FSM). I have found that JB Weld works wonders fot attaching these things. That's my new FSM Adhesive of choice. I haven't had one of those fail yet.


 

Maybe we're using a different type of Goop (or I've just been lucky).

 

Whenever I feel blue, I start breathing again.

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It's called E6000 Industrial Strength Craft Adhesive, made by Eclectic Products in Pineville, LA 71361, for technical assistance call 1-800-767-4667.

I used it to hold rocks onto a painted wood surface (dollhouse project for Diabetes Association) and it held them well enough for one of the rocks to be hammered, to chip off a piece for shaping, without coming unglued. So, My guess is it's pretty strong.

 

Cache you later,

Planet

 

"To err is human, to forgive....$5.00"

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Has anyone tried the Automotive glue for trim and such?

 

I have seen several styles of round magnets at Home depot and craft stores also. The film containers can be had at just about any Wally world store or Costco.

 

On another note, I have been looking at using the business card magnets and writing the cords for a multi cache on them. Has anyone tried this route yet?

 

Later, logscaler.

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I use the flexible type of magnet with adhesive backing. You can by a roll of it at craft stores. Just cut to size with scissors, peel off the paper backing and stick it on. It will not come off...it will barely pry off. The magnet is a little weak but if you stick another strip to whatever you want it to stick too then it's magnet to magnet and becomes stronger.

 

The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

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quote:
Originally posted by triple6:

Also, it occurs to me that it would be possible to make a log-only cache using a 35mm cannister if one were able to find the correct width of register tape or rolled paper for a printing calculator.


 

Here in Nashville for micros I have seen a bunch of stapled stickynote pads used for this. I also stole this idea for my micros. The problem here is the staple. At a contract job I finished they had a huge ibm copy machine that had a seperate stapler on it that would staple up to around 50 sheets pf paper. I simply got a few packs of the small post it notes and split them in half as each pad has 100 sheets on it. Stuck that in the stapler and you have a instant microlog. You may be able to take some into a printing company or a kinkos and have them staple them for you if you dont have access to one of these huge printers.

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quote:
Originally posted by bigredmed:

I made some pendants for Christmas this year and was recommended to some glue that was similar to model airplane glue and works very well. Just set up a microcache using this technique.

 


 

The micro got a work out at our Newbie Cache Hunt, and the cold weather got the best of the Jeweler's epoxy.

 

By appointment to the Court of HRM Queen Mikki I.

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