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whats in your ruck?(backpack)


Guest alanshot
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Guest alanshot

just curious as to what others carry around thru the woods with them. We will assume a GPSr and a compass, along with exchangeables.

 

Currently I am travelling light:

disposable camera

leatherman

and a snack

spare batteries

gloves and plastic bag (cache in trash out)

 

Once summer comes I'll probably add a water bottle, digital camera, etc.

 

[This message has been edited by alanshot (edited 13 December 2001).]

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Guest Geoffrey

If you are hiking to a cache in the snow:

 

Have 2 GPS units with a waypoint of your car's location, and put one in you backpack.

 

Have Lithium batteries in both GPS units.

Have a way to call somebody if you got snowed in while hiking to the cache.

A 2 way radio or cell phone.

 

Of course have these in the Pack also:

Stuff for the cache.

pens and pencils.

A notepad of yours to log your finds.

Food and water

A change of clothes if needed.

 

------------------

My GPS Information Page:

http://members.aol.com/geoffr524/myhomepage/howto.html

This page has many links about GPS information for the beginner.

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Guest alanshot

I thought we already determined in the other thread that caching in the snow wasnt a great idea anyway? icon_smile.gif

I was referring to spring because thats when I'll probably start up again. (although its dry and in the 50s this weekend here, so a few more before the season is out)

 

quote:
Originally posted by Geoffrey:

If you are hiking to a cache in the snow:

 

Have 2 GPS units with a waypoint of your car's location, and put one in you backpack.

 

Have Lithium batteries in both GPS units.

Have a way to call somebody if you got snowed in while hiking to the cache.

A 2 way radio or cell phone.

 

Of course have these in the Pack also:

Stuff for the cache.

pens and pencils.

A notepad of yours to log your finds.

Food and water

A change of clothes if needed.

 


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Guest alanshot

I thought we already determined in the other thread that caching in the snow wasnt a great idea anyway? icon_smile.gif

I was referring to spring because thats when I'll probably start up again. (although its dry and in the 50s this weekend here, so a few more before the season is out)

 

quote:
Originally posted by Geoffrey:

If you are hiking to a cache in the snow:

 

Have 2 GPS units with a waypoint of your car's location, and put one in you backpack.

 

Have Lithium batteries in both GPS units.

Have a way to call somebody if you got snowed in while hiking to the cache.

A 2 way radio or cell phone.

 

Of course have these in the Pack also:

Stuff for the cache.

pens and pencils.

A notepad of yours to log your finds.

Food and water

A change of clothes if needed.

 


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Pretty much everything from this thread, lol:

 

http://forums.Groundspeak.com/ubb/Forum2/HTML/000497.html

 

In my Ultimate GPS Case:

GPS (duh!)

Silva compass

Mini-Maglite

4 pack of spare AA's (Works for both GPS or flashlight)

2 pens

 

In my backpack:

trinkets/tradables

more AA's (just in case!)

my personal logbook

ast. pens/pencils/markers (can be donated to a needy cache)

a few small 50 cent notepads (again to repair a cache where log is missing/wet/full)

bunch of ziplock bags (same thing)

swiss army knife (in addition to the lockblade in my pocket)

can of mace

bottle of water

insect repellent (when the weather warms up again)

Whistle (no wait, I traded that out the other day, need to replace it icon_smile.gif )

lighter

trailmaps of most of the parks I've hunted caches

 

Need to add yet:

first aid kit

leatherman tool

 

Probably some other stuff I'm forgetting too.

 

[This message has been edited by Mopar (edited 13 December 2001).]

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Pretty much everything from this thread, lol:

 

http://forums.Groundspeak.com/ubb/Forum2/HTML/000497.html

 

In my Ultimate GPS Case:

GPS (duh!)

Silva compass

Mini-Maglite

4 pack of spare AA's (Works for both GPS or flashlight)

2 pens

 

In my backpack:

trinkets/tradables

more AA's (just in case!)

my personal logbook

ast. pens/pencils/markers (can be donated to a needy cache)

a few small 50 cent notepads (again to repair a cache where log is missing/wet/full)

bunch of ziplock bags (same thing)

swiss army knife (in addition to the lockblade in my pocket)

can of mace

bottle of water

insect repellent (when the weather warms up again)

Whistle (no wait, I traded that out the other day, need to replace it icon_smile.gif )

lighter

trailmaps of most of the parks I've hunted caches

 

Need to add yet:

first aid kit

leatherman tool

 

Probably some other stuff I'm forgetting too.

 

[This message has been edited by Mopar (edited 13 December 2001).]

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Guest casey4791

Southern California (mostly urban or beach) Cache Bag (for weekend cache marathon) :

 

Two pairs of sunglasses (lest one of them breaks!)

Bottle O'water

Pack of Trident Winterfresh gum

2 pens, one marker

2 AA batteries

1 Red Bull

$2.00 for one Super Star burger at Carl's Jr.

Cache goodies

Hand Lotion (winter) Suntan lotion (summer)

Flashlight

Hooded sweatshirt (when it gets cold at night)

Chapstick

 

For more rural caches, replace the $2.00 burger money for a bigger bottle of water. icon_biggrin.gif

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Guest casey4791

Southern California (mostly urban or beach) Cache Bag (for weekend cache marathon) :

 

Two pairs of sunglasses (lest one of them breaks!)

Bottle O'water

Pack of Trident Winterfresh gum

2 pens, one marker

2 AA batteries

1 Red Bull

$2.00 for one Super Star burger at Carl's Jr.

Cache goodies

Hand Lotion (winter) Suntan lotion (summer)

Flashlight

Hooded sweatshirt (when it gets cold at night)

Chapstick

 

For more rural caches, replace the $2.00 burger money for a bigger bottle of water. icon_biggrin.gif

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Guest kbraband

quote:
Originally posted by alanshot:

I thought we already determined in the other thread that caching in the snow wasnt a great idea anyway? icon_smile.gif


I think you made that assumption, but we did not all agree. (See my post there)

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Guest kbraband

quote:
Originally posted by alanshot:

I thought we already determined in the other thread that caching in the snow wasnt a great idea anyway? icon_smile.gif


I think you made that assumption, but we did not all agree. (See my post there)

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Guest GrouseTales

Besides an assortment of cache goodies, I usually have the following:

 

Spare compass

backup GPSR

notebook

L.E.D. flashlight

8 "AA" Batteries

shapee marker

paint pen

camera

trash bags

ziplock bags

Ibuprofen

extra pens/pencils

canteen full of water

bug spray (summer)

bug head net (summer)

extra gloves/hat (winter)

head lamp (if caching towards evening)

bag of fun sized snickers bars (survival item)

knife

multi-tool

cell phone

small survival pack containing: water purification tablets, orange surveyors tape, trioxane fuel bars, magnesium fire starter, waterproof matches, another cheap compass, cigarette lighter, emergency foil blanket. (all of which fits in a quart sized ziploc bag).

 

If searching for an urban cache, I skip most of the survival related items.

 

Whenever in the back country, prepare as though you had to spend the night in the woods. You never know what could happen.

 

Grouse Tales

 

 

[This message has been edited by GrouseTales (edited 16 December 2001).]

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Guest BLEdwardsJ

so far my pack (a Kelty Kid Pack) includes

1 Kid, plus necessary kid stuff

diapers

wipes

pacifier

hydration bladder maybe another water bottle

snacks / power bars

emergency rain poncho

leatherman

stuff for trading

extra socks

50' peice of small tubular webbing (for helping us down/up short steep stuff

cell phone

walkie talkie if others are with us

first aid kit

matches

sometimes binoculars

and if we remember the GPS and compus

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Guest Moun10Bike

A fun topic!

 

I use a Lowepro backpack made for photographers; it has adjustable compartments and many zippered pockets that are perfect for carrying all sorts of small items for geocaching. Currently, I'm carrying the following:

 

  • Assorted Travel Bugs
  • A handful of my signature geocoins
  • Some little license plate keychains that I had made with "GEOCACHING" engraved on them (great for microcaches)
  • A few Sacagawea gold dollars (also great for microcaches)
  • Some Geocaching.com compass keychains (ditto)
  • Backup GPSR
  • Digital camera
  • Lens pen and cleaning fluid for cleaning lens of camera
  • Custom stamp and ink pad (for signing logbook)
  • Assorted small containers (film canisters, vitamin bottles) for on-the-fly microcaches
  • Emergency whistle
  • Extra AA batteries
  • Small bottle of StingEze
  • Small first-aid kit
  • Chapstick
  • Flashlight
  • Permanent marker (for labeling caches)
  • Leatherman
  • Digital recorder
  • Map compass
  • Sighting compass
  • Small set of binoculars
  • Tree finder
  • Extra Ziploc bags (small and large)
  • Zip ties
  • Extra pens (to replace those missing from caches)
  • Extra geocaching notes (to place in caches missing them or for creation of on-the-fly caches)
  • Homemade geocaching decals and magnets
  • Rite-in-the-Rain logbooks
  • Print outs and maps of caches on the current "to be hit" list

 

------------------

Jon (Moun10Bike)

34H/138F

N 47° 36.649', W 122° 3.616'

www.switchbacks.com/geocaching.html

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Guest kernbob

***

spare keys

trashbags

fisher space pen

notepad

energy bars

light stick

"emer'gen-C " vitamin C & minerals packs

flashlight

nametag ID

leatherman type tool

'Jo' or hiking stick

A dozen spare batteries fit lights and GPSr

Bug juice and Sun screen (in season)

 

First aid kit includes:

aspirin

instant cold pack

Kling wrap

tape

Elastic stretch wrap

Liquid bandage

Bandaids

Mole skin

Betadine

 

[This message has been edited by kernbob (edited 17 December 2001).]

 

[This message has been edited by kernbob (edited 17 December 2001).]

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Kernkob,

 

I'm glad to see someone with a CamelBak. I've been looking at them for some time now, mostly for use when I ride my bike. I'd come to the conclusion that I don't like to carry weight on my back while I ride, but they may be just the thing for a Geocaching trek or short hike.

 

This brings another question to light.

 

What kind of packs do ya'll use? Right now, I've just got a couple of school-type backpacks I've used to carry around a few things if I go out somewhere, but for some light hiking (Geocaching, short day hikes, that sort of thing) what is a good pack?

 

As it is currently, I don't carry much with me. GPS, cheap compass, pen, couple of treasures... stuff 'em all in my pockets and go.

 

Jamie

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Guest alanshot

I THOUGHT about just buying the GPS module for my Palm Vx... then I remembered how much of a beating it could take, and how badly I REALLY need it for work (and cant afford to replace it)... I opted for the Venture instead. much cheaper in the long run.

 

quote:
Originally posted by Choberiba:

I'm amazed....

Not a single Palm in that whole list.

 

I don't use a backpack, I wear a photojournalist vest.

 

vest.jpg

 


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Guest Moun10Bike

That reminds me: I also use a CamelBak when on longer hiking and biking trips. For biking, I use a CamelBak H.A.W.G. combined with a fanny pack, while on hikes I use an REI backpack with a pocket for holding a bladder.

 

quote:
Originally posted by JamieZ:

What kind of packs do ya'll use? Right now, I've just got a couple of school-type backpacks I've used to carry around a few things if I go out somewhere, but for some light hiking (Geocaching, short day hikes, that sort of thing) what is a good pack?


 

The pack that I use is a Lowepro Photo Trekker. The Lowepro photography backpacks are more expensive that standard school-type backpacks and daypacks, but as you can see from the photo in the link, it has a bunch of customizable dividers and pockets.

 

------------------

Jon (Moun10Bike)

34H/138F

N 47° 36.649', W 122° 3.616'

www.switchbacks.com/geocaching.html

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Guest Prime Suspect

Not counting what's in my pockets (SA knife, map print outs)

  • pens
  • notebook (to leave if missing from cache)
  • ziplock bags
  • compass
  • my old GPS II+
  • batteries
  • pruning shears, to extricate myself from thorny situations
  • a good flashlight (Maglite)
  • extendable mirror (looks kinda like a dentists mirror, but a bit larger, and telescopes from 6" to about 24") - great for looking behind and under things
  • disposable eyeglass cleaning cloths (to wipe the sweat off my sunglasses)
  • DEET spray
  • travel pak of tissues
  • water (usually a 20oz bike bottle)
  • wireless Palm Pilot & keyboard, if I want to post a log in the field
  • cell phone

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Guest wizonkiz

quote:
Originally posted by ruprecht -seamus:

I just stuff my gps in my pocket and go. If it is an extended trip then I bring camping supplies. The lighter the better.


 

I'm with you.....My Magellan Pioneer and a half case of Schmidt Beer.

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Guest sbukosky

Everyone has great suggestions for what to carry. I'm torn between the Boy Scout in me of "Be Prepared" and the motorcyclist in me that means minimalist is better. While I have not gone on long hunts, I'm often in areas where if I got hurt, it might be a few days before I'm tracked down. So, about the only thing beyond spare batteries is my cell phone and a pen for the logs.

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Guest RedwoodRed

is a radio term he just made up. The pack has a elasti-mesh pocket on either side for water bottles or in our case, a 2-meter ham handi-talkie. He would love to find a light-weight gel-cell battery so that his HT doesn't run out of juice before the GPS does.

 

Other than the usual stuff, I always carry my PDA (Compaq iPaq 3635). It is great for taking notes on caches, doing calculations for puzzles or clues, and I keep a list of potential cache coordinates while traveling. It is my "back-up brain" and I never leave home without it. Now, if I could just find a decent waterproof hip/fanny pack to put it and a second GPS...

 

Besides, if we got board or lost, I can always play games!

rolleyes.gif

 

------------------

Lori aka: RedwoodRed

KF6VFI

"I don't get lost, I investigate alternative destinations."

http://www.geogadgets.com

http://www.beautywithattitude.com

http://www.w6hy.org

 

[This message has been edited by RedwoodRed (edited 19 December 2001).]

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Hey Moun10Bike I got to know what a Tree finder is. I keep having flashes of a geocacher standing in the woods with some gadget that points toward the nearest tree.

 

mcb

 

quote:
Originally posted by Moun10Bike:

A fun topic!

 

I use a Lowepro backpack made for photographers; it has adjustable compartments and many zippered pockets that are perfect for carrying all sorts of small items for geocaching. Currently, I'm carrying the following:

 

  • Assorted Travel Bugs
  • A handful of my signature geocoins
  • Some little license plate keychains that I had made with "GEOCACHING" engraved on them (great for microcaches)
  • A few Sacagawea gold dollars (also great for microcaches)
  • Some Geocaching.com compass keychains (ditto)
  • Backup GPSR
  • Digital camera
  • Lens pen and cleaning fluid for cleaning lens of camera
  • Custom stamp and ink pad (for signing logbook)
  • Assorted small containers (film canisters, vitamin bottles) for on-the-fly microcaches
  • Emergency whistle
  • Extra AA batteries
  • Small bottle of StingEze
  • Small first-aid kit
  • Chapstick
  • Flashlight
  • Permanent marker (for labeling caches)
  • Leatherman
  • Digital recorder
  • Map compass
  • Sighting compass
  • Small set of binoculars
  • Tree finder
  • Extra Ziploc bags (small and large)
  • Zip ties
  • Extra pens (to replace those missing from caches)
  • Extra geocaching notes (to place in caches missing them or for creation of on-the-fly caches)
  • Homemade geocaching decals and magnets
  • Rite-in-the-Rain logbooks
  • Print outs and maps of caches on the current "to be hit" list

 


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Guest Moun10Bike

quote:
Originally posted by honeypie72:

Tree finder?


 

Yeah, I guess that name isn't very descriptive! That's the "official" name, though: "Pacific Coast Tree Finder." It's just a little book for identifying trees. It starts by having you categorize the needles/leaves, then asks a series of branching questions leading to the final identification of the tree. It's good for those of us who don't know our tamarack from our lodgepole pines at a glance.

 

Sorry if that's an anticlimactic answer! icon_smile.gif

 

------------------

Jon (Moun10Bike)

34H/142F

N 47° 36.649', W 122° 3.616'

www.switchbacks.com/geocaching.html

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Guest Moun10Bike

quote:
Originally posted by honeypie72:

Tree finder?


 

Yeah, I guess that name isn't very descriptive! That's the "official" name, though: "Pacific Coast Tree Finder." It's just a little book for identifying trees. It starts by having you categorize the needles/leaves, then asks a series of branching questions leading to the final identification of the tree. It's good for those of us who don't know our tamarack from our lodgepole pines at a glance.

 

Sorry if that's an anticlimactic answer! icon_smile.gif

 

------------------

Jon (Moun10Bike)

34H/142F

N 47° 36.649', W 122° 3.616'

www.switchbacks.com/geocaching.html

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Guest CharlieP

I started out just carrying a couple of trade items in my pockets, but then realized I needed to carry water and some other items. Now I wear a backpack that must weigh about 15 pounds!

 

lots of trade items

copies of cache site pages

water bottle

compass and small spare

digital camera

cellphone

ziplock bags

plastic trash bags

rain poncho

flashlight (uses AA batteries)

spare AA batteries (6)

extra copies of cache note

(to replace wet or damaged copies)

ball point pen

paper towels and hand towels

(for drying out wet caches)

 

FWIW,

CharlieP

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Guest ASOinFL

Like Choberiba, I use a vest to pack most of my goodies in.

 

GPS (I know, it sounds silly, but I actually

forgot it once, though I did find the

cache but it was tough).

Notebook w/pen an pencil

Flashlight (even in the day, never know what

rat hole you'll have to climb or look

into).

Spare Change for that soda machine deep in

the marsh where Orlando Cache likes to

hide his. icon_wink.gif

A knife (at least one)

A pistol (hey, it pays to be a cop...ran

across two snakes, one gator, 10,000

spiders, 1 wild boar, and legions of

raccoons while hiking here in FL).

Some hard candies

Spare batteries (for flashlight and GPS)

Trade pack (stuff to leave in cache)

Water bottle

Printouts of the caches on that days trips

(which I have forgotten to)

Hand radio (in case there's an emergency, I

can still call my dispatch center but

don't tell them at work I'm using it

for personal fun). Shhhhh icon_wink.gif

Usually a mini-cache just in case I come

across an a great location.

Leatherman tool

"bout 20' of rope

Hiking pole (Great for sweeping spider webs

out of the way)

Leathergloves

A small first aid kit

Small binoculars

 

and that's about it for a day trip.

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Guest ASOinFL

Like Choberiba, I use a vest to pack most of my goodies in.

 

GPS (I know, it sounds silly, but I actually

forgot it once, though I did find the

cache but it was tough).

Notebook w/pen an pencil

Flashlight (even in the day, never know what

rat hole you'll have to climb or look

into).

Spare Change for that soda machine deep in

the marsh where Orlando Cache likes to

hide his. icon_wink.gif

A knife (at least one)

A pistol (hey, it pays to be a cop...ran

across two snakes, one gator, 10,000

spiders, 1 wild boar, and legions of

raccoons while hiking here in FL).

Some hard candies

Spare batteries (for flashlight and GPS)

Trade pack (stuff to leave in cache)

Water bottle

Printouts of the caches on that days trips

(which I have forgotten to)

Hand radio (in case there's an emergency, I

can still call my dispatch center but

don't tell them at work I'm using it

for personal fun). Shhhhh icon_wink.gif

Usually a mini-cache just in case I come

across an a great location.

Leatherman tool

"bout 20' of rope

Hiking pole (Great for sweeping spider webs

out of the way)

Leathergloves

A small first aid kit

Small binoculars

 

and that's about it for a day trip.

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Guest blscearce

Up until now, I've carried:

 

  • eMap
  • Water (I have a soft neoprene bag from REI, find it works better than a hard bottle)
  • Handspring Visor with geocache info (and astronomical info, so I know when sunset is; and phone numbers, Just In Case)
  • Decent sighting compass (Silva Type 20)
  • Cell phone (doesn't actually work in a lot of valley areas here)
  • Leatherman
  • Ziploc bags (sandwich sized and gallon sized)
  • Trail maps
  • Plastic grocery bags (for garbage)
  • Trail mix snacks
  • Flashlight (mini-Maglite that takes AAs)
  • Pens
  • Spare batteries
  • Stuff for trade

 

When I'm actually on the hunt, the map, Visor and compass are in my pocket, and the eMap is in my left hand.

 

If I have the dog with me, I take his pack as well, which has a collapsible water bowl, some dog treats, and bags for picking up his waste.

 

This thread has been pretty instructive. I think I'll add leather gloves and paper towels to the list, and look around for a small first aid kit.

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Most if not all the items I bring with me have been mentioned...depending on the length of trip (urban cache, 5 mile hiking trip, overnight expedition) I use either a fanny pack, a lumbar pack, daypack, day & 1/2 pack to a full blown 60 liter backpack.

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Guest Buzzbait

I'm a bit new at all of this, but here's an idea. I've used Ziploc bags in my camping and fishing equipment many times, but there's a problem with them. Condensation tends to build up inside of the bag, often destroying the contents. Now I keep those little silica gel packets, often found in show boxes, in all of my Ziplocs. Everything is nice and dry now. It sounds like silica gel could help protect many cache items and log books in areas where temperature changes often occur. Sorry if this is nothing new to you veterans.

 

I know that, at the rate at which my wife buys shoes, I could fill every Ziploc in every stash in America with some silica gel!!!

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Guest kernbob

I forgot to add this to my list of stuff to pack. My brother in law in Seattle taught me to pack along some handi wipes and a spare pair of shoes for after the hike. I was skeptical but tried it anyway. You'll love getting your feet cooled off and fresh dry shoes to drive home in.

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I probably go overboard, But you never know.

 

I have a Three pocket fanny pack, a vest and a backpack.

The fanny pack for is for those in town Caches

The fanny pack & a vest for city park Caches

The fanny pack, vest & a Backpack for Caches that have any trail hiking

 

A phone call is placed when I leave my vehicle (sooner if I know I will be out of cell range and another call when I have completed the GeoHunt.

Cache printouts & Delorme Topo printout (left at home with wife)

Back Pack Contents

Garmin Legend GPS

Military Compass

Cache printouts & Delorme Topo printout

Handmade Hiking stick

Flashlight & LED Headlamp - ALLWAYS

Spare batteries (for flashlight and GPS)

A small pocket knife

A hunting knife (on my side)

Gerber Multi tool

Pack shovel

Water bottle (4- Two to carry and two in the car)

Trail Mix

One MRE (New Military MRE’s)

Storm Matches, Lighter &

Fire Starter (backup)

Some hard candies

Cache Trade pack (to trade and replenish low Caches)

Extra Log Book and zip lock baggies (for Caches)

4.5 x 3.25 Composition Book w/pen & pencil

Garbage bags

Cell Phone

Family FRS radio

Cherokee hand held CB

40' of climbing rope

Caribiners

Leather gloves

Camera

Monocular

Small binoculars

First aid kit

Snake bite kit

Gold Towel

Windbreaker

GeoCaching Cards w/my e-mail on back

 

As I stated, I probably go overboard..

 

Frank

IdahoMan

IdahoMan@cableone.net

Lewis Clark Valley GeoCachers

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quote:
Originally posted by alanshot:

I thought we already determined in the other thread that caching in the snow wasnt a great idea anyway? icon_smile.gif


 

WIMP!!!!

 

Try that in Canada! You'd have a caching season of about 4 months!

 

Rob

Mobile Cache Command

4525_1300.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by alanshot:

I thought we already determined in the other thread that caching in the snow wasnt a great idea anyway? icon_smile.gif


 

WIMP!!!!

 

Try that in Canada! You'd have a caching season of about 4 months!

 

Rob

Mobile Cache Command

4525_1300.gif

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I carry a large Marmot Walkabout Lumbar Pack with smaller plastic bags inside. It holds about 625 cu. in. Without the water and with the basic supplies listed below it weighs about 3 pounds. The stuff I carry for first aid Cost about $20. Since I bought it all separately I have re-fills for everything. If I use something (and I have) I try and replace it that night. I keep a gallon of drinking water in my van. After reading this you'll know for sure I'm paranoid. I hate to be caught without something I need.

 

In Lumbar Pack

Cell phone

Area topo maps

Small digital camera

2 quarts water

Bug spray (pure deet)

Sunblock

4 backup AA batteries for GPSr or camera

Pad

Pen

Pencil

Small Carabiner

Bandana

Cheap Sunglasses (in case mine break or someone forgets theirs)

Multitool on pack belt

Large empty ziplock bag for trash

Print outs for various area caches

Depending on the day. Sandwiches, fruit and crackers.

 

Small ziplock bag

6 various Gauze pads

4 Alcohol preps

4 Band aids

4 Antiseptic wipes

2 Anti-Itch patches

2 Mole skin pads

Toilet paper

 

Small ziplock bag

1 Itch eraser

1 Medical tape

1 Neosporin

6 Aspirin

4 Midol

2 Antihistamine

2 very strong pain killers

2 caffeine pills

Needle point tweezers with magnifier built in (for tick removal)

2 rubber gloves

small lighter

 

Small ziplock bag

2 Clif Bars

2 Gu packets

2 Glucerna bars (the wife has diabetes)

 

Large ziplock bag

Pencils

NY state quarters

Small trade items (stuff that I see while I'm on my way out the door)

4 AA batteries for trade

 

 

icon_wink.gif

 

====================================

As always, the above statements are just MHO.

====================================

 

39478_400.jpg

 

[This message was edited by Harrald on April 20, 2002 at 08:23 PM.]

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I carry a large Marmot Walkabout Lumbar Pack with smaller plastic bags inside. It holds about 625 cu. in. Without the water and with the basic supplies listed below it weighs about 3 pounds. The stuff I carry for first aid Cost about $20. Since I bought it all separately I have re-fills for everything. If I use something (and I have) I try and replace it that night. I keep a gallon of drinking water in my van. After reading this you'll know for sure I'm paranoid. I hate to be caught without something I need.

 

In Lumbar Pack

Cell phone

Area topo maps

Small digital camera

2 quarts water

Bug spray (pure deet)

Sunblock

4 backup AA batteries for GPSr or camera

Pad

Pen

Pencil

Small Carabiner

Bandana

Cheap Sunglasses (in case mine break or someone forgets theirs)

Multitool on pack belt

Large empty ziplock bag for trash

Print outs for various area caches

Depending on the day. Sandwiches, fruit and crackers.

 

Small ziplock bag

6 various Gauze pads

4 Alcohol preps

4 Band aids

4 Antiseptic wipes

2 Anti-Itch patches

2 Mole skin pads

Toilet paper

 

Small ziplock bag

1 Itch eraser

1 Medical tape

1 Neosporin

6 Aspirin

4 Midol

2 Antihistamine

2 very strong pain killers

2 caffeine pills

Needle point tweezers with magnifier built in (for tick removal)

2 rubber gloves

small lighter

 

Small ziplock bag

2 Clif Bars

2 Gu packets

2 Glucerna bars (the wife has diabetes)

 

Large ziplock bag

Pencils

NY state quarters

Small trade items (stuff that I see while I'm on my way out the door)

4 AA batteries for trade

 

 

icon_wink.gif

 

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As always, the above statements are just MHO.

====================================

 

39478_400.jpg

 

[This message was edited by Harrald on April 20, 2002 at 08:23 PM.]

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Day Hike Supplies and Equipment

 

Water (usually two liters per person)

Water purification tablets or a water filter

Map and Compass - GPS optional

Food - (Sandwich & Energy Bars)

Sweat Pants and Sweat Shirt (for emergency clothes)

Long underwear (top and bottom, wool or polyproplylene or duofold)

Extra Underwear

Extra Pants (Light synthetics, not jeans)

Wool Pants (If early or late in season)

Long-sleeve shirt

Light wool sweater or fleece jacket with hood

Rain Gear (Goretex, with hood) (Rain Pants)

Wool Stocking Cap

Wide Brim Hat with UV protection

Bandana

First Aid Kit Whistle & Signal Mirror

Lip Balm Flashlight & Candle & Extra batteries & Bulbs

Insect repellent

Pocket Knife - Sierra Saw

Sunscreen

Gaiters

Sunglasses (with 98% UV filtering)

Toilet Paper & Trowel & Sanitizer

Zip-lock bag to carry out toilet

Notebook and pencil

Watch

Lighter and Matches

Bivy Shelter

2 days food

Light weight rope

Camp Stove

Shotgun and Ammo

Coffee & Pot & Cup

 

The "Bushwhacker"

>>--->

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I'm guessing some of these previous posts are overnighters? Geez that's a load! My longest hikes have been less than 5 hours.

 

I make my pack as light as possible.

Area Map

Printouts for local caches

Tradables

Pen

Personal Journal

2 trash bags (1-trash, 1-rain)

AA batteries

small mag light

stun gun

compass

Bucktool

rock hammer (for geology geek)

camera

tweezers

leash

Deep Woods OFF

handkerchief (ever wonder where that word came from?)

Lunch (sandwich, chips, orange, dog food)

2 water jugs(1-me, 1-Tasha)w/collapsible bowl

 

Would really like to find Tasha her own pack, because I'm tried of carrying her water AND mine. Anyone know of a good saddle pack? Maybe just a doggy Platypus!

icon_biggrin.gif

 

txjacksons.gif

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I'm guessing some of these previous posts are overnighters? Geez that's a load! My longest hikes have been less than 5 hours.

 

I make my pack as light as possible.

Area Map

Printouts for local caches

Tradables

Pen

Personal Journal

2 trash bags (1-trash, 1-rain)

AA batteries

small mag light

stun gun

compass

Bucktool

rock hammer (for geology geek)

camera

tweezers

leash

Deep Woods OFF

handkerchief (ever wonder where that word came from?)

Lunch (sandwich, chips, orange, dog food)

2 water jugs(1-me, 1-Tasha)w/collapsible bowl

 

Would really like to find Tasha her own pack, because I'm tried of carrying her water AND mine. Anyone know of a good saddle pack? Maybe just a doggy Platypus!

icon_biggrin.gif

 

txjacksons.gif

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ALWAYS Magelan 315

sometimes extra batteries

sometimes a camera

sometimes water, always have it in car.

sometimes a gun for creatures

usually just the gps though

 

Sorry to say that is it, if it is a long trek i will take so much that a pack train is almost needed to carry it all though. The above list is for the close to road caches (0.4 miles or less)

 

Now where did I set my GPS??? planetrobert.net

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What I carry:

 

cachebait

small utility knife/plier thing

extra cache notes

mag compass

water

maps to get to caches

maps for the Cleveland Metroparks

very basic first aid kit

towel

garbage bags

zip bags

Deep Woods OFF

either snack foods or lunch (depends on how long we are out)

pens and pencils

extra batteries

flashlight

 

Thats about it. But does anyone know where I can get a bottle of Ol' Janx Spirit? I need to clean my towel off every now and then.

 

Never hold a cat and a Dustbuster at the same time

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I thought this might fit in well here...in case any new folks are looking for an excellent pack in which to carry all these necessities, check out the Camelbak Transformer at http://www.camelbak.com/mil/cb_prod.cfm?Product_ID=154&CATID=6

 

Before my glowing review, please understand that I do not stand to gain anything from Camelbak. I'm just a very satisfied and impressed customer. This is my 2nd Camelbak...the first was a H.A.W.G. and I needed something a little bigger with more room. If you're not familiar with Camelbak, they make hydration systems that allow you to have ready access to water without having to dig around your pack for bottles...

 

If you check that link, you may think it's a little pricy but the quality and utility make it worth every penny, IMHO. I just bought one about 2 months ago and it's great. Most places have it for quite a bit less than their MSRP. If you use all the pouches, it has about 1100 in^3 of storage. It is compatable with the military MOLLE system so more pouches can be added, if necessary. The pouches I use can be seen at http://www.tacticaltailor.com/catalog/pockets.htm

(Also stand nothing to gain from these folks...just another great company with great gear...)

 

The Camelbak Transformer holds 3 liters of water which is very important to us geocachers in the warmer climates. You wouldn't believe how fast you go through water (or *should* go through it) when it's hot...

 

Anyway, it has compartments inside the individual removable pouches. They are very well thought-out in their design and the construction overall is great.

 

Don't want to write an entire essay on it, but this thing is worth checking out. (Believe me, I could write a lot more... icon_smile.gif ) I use mine every day even without filling with water, just as a regular day pack.

 

JM-99

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