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take alongs? SAFETY


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i know this should be in the other thread but i think it is important enough to stand alone.

 

the one thing most people don't reference taking with them is knowledge and experience. do most people here have a background in survival and/or first-aid? i read in a posting about having to canoe to find a cache, where those gc'ers swimmers and were they experienced boaters?

 

i know this may seem to be getting a little picky but i regularly camp in all four seasons in pretty remote areas in some inhospitiable climates and have experienced many emergencies in the bush that could prove to life threatening if not dealt with properly.

 

a form of communication may well come in handy but here in NL cell phones (sat phones aren't the norm yet)don't work in 50-60% of out wilderness so prearranged meeting/check-in procedures may be necessary.

 

an interesting thought:

emergencies are just that, situations you aren't prepared for, so ensure that you have the tools to ad lib.

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If you were, your pack would be too heavy to carry. However, most situations can be covered with a few basics.

 

#1. Have a good first aid kit. The kit I carry has hemostats, a trake tube, and an eppi-injector. I hope I never need any of that, but.... (Hemostats are good for pulling cactus thorns).

 

#2. If you trek outdoors a lot, get some medical training. I was a combat lifesaver (additional duty) in the Army. My son is a para-medic with the fire dept. The Red Cross or your local community college is a good place to start.

 

In my part of the country, some additional goodies are useful. I carry a signal mirror for daylight use, a flashing beacon for nighttime use, and spare batteries for the electronics stuff. One note... try to get your equipment so it all uses the same type batteries. You can interchange them that way. If not, carry FRESH NEW spares. And keep them packed so they cannot short out in your pack and be dead when you need them most. A lightweight mylar emergency blanket and lightweight binoculars round out the pack.

 

Last... my family and I are ham-radio operators. Communications is a routine thing for us, but it is important! What works for you is what you should use.

 

If you can stop the bleeding, treat for shock, and call for help, you will survive 99% of the situations you come upon.

 

Give it some thought... what works for me may not work for you, and I have forgotten a lot. We can all learn from each other. I look forward to learning what YOU think.

 

Mike. KD9KC.

El Paso, Texas.

 

Seventeen minutes after her FIRST call for help, police officers arrived to find Ronyale White dead.

 

Prohibiting self defense is the ultimate crime. Police carry guns to protect themselves. What protects YOU ???

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Just bring the toothless helper monkey. He can run for help, screech really loud, and render aid to you if it becomes necessary.

 

The first time I saw this come up in the forums was http://opentopic.Groundspeak.com/0/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=1750973553&f=3000917383&m=2700927125&r=4710963325#4710963325

 

And it has come up a few more times since then. It truly amazes me the amount of stuff people carry to find a box of trinkets. I could understand a pack full of provisions if the caches was three or four miles away, but that’s not been a problem so far for me. Most of the caches I’ve read about are less than a mile or so away from where you park.

 

I’m not against being prepared, just seems like overkill for most caches.

 

><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><

What is the price of experience, do men buy it for a song,

Or wisdom for a dance in the street.................

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I'll echo Criminal's comments. For most caches, my safety equipment consists of band-aids, a moist towlette, and spare batteries.

 

I guess these count, too, although I've never looked at them as safety equipment: My compass is built into my watch. I have a flashlight, but I mainly use it for looking in dark holes between rocks. I have 50 feet of rope in my pack, but it's more for measuring than for safety. I also have an old dull pocketknife that I plan to leave in a cache some day.

 

If it's a warm day, I'll bring a bottle of water and sunglasses.

 

On the one trip I've made to do caches that were more than just a half-hour trip in, I brought extra food, extra water, a rain poncho, a USGS map of the area (from Topozone), a sweater, a bigger flashlight (I knew we'd be going through an abandoned tunnel) and a cell phone (which, as I expected, only worked when we were close to the trailhead).

 

"Why don't you just ask somebody?"

"No, no. I've got a map. Don't worry about that."

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We always carry a Cell phone. Granted, in alot of places that people Geocache, this does no good, but here in Chicagoland, you can get a signal just about anywhere.

Also, I carry a folding knife with a 6" blade and my Leatherman. Although, that is not unique to Caching, as I always have these 2 items with me, even while at work, shopping, Etc.

A small maglight is in the pack for looking in places that I really dont want to put my hand in. (Used it for a cache today, in fact)

Of course, Always have water to drink. If we go out on a quick Cache, we dont bother, but if we are in for a long hike, or are hitting more then 1 cache in a day, we bring water, be it in our pack, or in a cooler in the car to drink between caches. Of course, when it is hot out, it goes with us.

As far as first aid goes, yes, I do have first aid training. I received it while doing work for the local ESDA group. We don't carry a first aid kit, but I am starting to think that it would be a good idea.

 

Laugh now, but I've got plenty to do when I'm the last person on the planet

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I think a big dose of common sense would be a MUST have item. If you think you are getting in over your head then you probably are. At that point you should ask yourself a couple questions.

 

1. Should I throw caution to the wind and go for it?

 

or

 

2. Backoff and live to cache another day.

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Originally posted by KD9KC:

quote:
#1. Have a good first aid kit. The kit I carry has hemostats, a trake tube, and an eppi-injector. I hope I never need any of that, but.... (Hemostats are good for pulling cactus thorns).


 

I'm assuming you mean an ET or endotracheal tube. Do you also carry some means of ventilating through it? How 'bout the laryngoscope blade? Stethoscope for auscultating lung sounds to confirm placement? Seems like a lot of excess *stuff* for something that you'd seldom use on a backcountry trip let alone a short stroll in the woods to find a cache.

 

I do agree that a first aid kit is a good idea but I think it should be practical and contain things likely to be needed. Mine has betadine, bandaids, 4x4's, a Sam splint, gauze, tape (a good tape job can fix almost anything! icon_biggrin.gif), and sterile saline. The saline is great for getting bugs and sand out of eyes but I'm thinking of leaving the Sam splint in the vehicle since it takes up too much room. Tape a couple of sturdy sticks will serve the same purpose. Would like to come up with an epi-pen. How did you manage that?

 

I do carry a larger first aid kit in our vehicle but I've found that I rarely use more than an occasional bandaid.

 

GeoMedic - team leader of GeoStars

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Originally posted by KD9KC:

quote:
#1. Have a good first aid kit. The kit I carry has hemostats, a trake tube, and an eppi-injector. I hope I never need any of that, but.... (Hemostats are good for pulling cactus thorns).


 

I'm assuming you mean an ET or endotracheal tube. Do you also carry some means of ventilating through it? How 'bout the laryngoscope blade? Stethoscope for auscultating lung sounds to confirm placement? Seems like a lot of excess *stuff* for something that you'd seldom use on a backcountry trip let alone a short stroll in the woods to find a cache.

 

I do agree that a first aid kit is a good idea but I think it should be practical and contain things likely to be needed. Mine has betadine, bandaids, 4x4's, a Sam splint, gauze, tape (a good tape job can fix almost anything! icon_biggrin.gif), and sterile saline. The saline is great for getting bugs and sand out of eyes but I'm thinking of leaving the Sam splint in the vehicle since it takes up too much room. Tape a couple of sturdy sticks will serve the same purpose. Would like to come up with an epi-pen. How did you manage that?

 

I do carry a larger first aid kit in our vehicle but I've found that I rarely use more than an occasional bandaid.

 

GeoMedic - team leader of GeoStars

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quote:
I'm assuming you mean an ET or endotracheal tube. Do you also carry some means of ventilating through it? How 'bout the laryngoscope blade? Stethoscope for auscultating lung sounds to confirm placement? Seems like a lot of excess *stuff* for something that you'd seldom use on a backcountry trip let alone a short stroll in the woods to find a cache.

 

I was curious about that myself. But then again, I'm the one who used to carry (in my car) not only a fully stocked jump kit (Yeah, with IV stuff too!), but I had IV hooks hung on my trunk lid, just waiting for the day I drove up on the Big One! icon_biggrin.gificon_wink.gif

 

I'm burned out now. When I go caching or camping, I have a few old bandaids thrown in a baggie with a couple of Benadryl and Immodium. icon_biggrin.gif

I'm so bad that the last time we went caching, my kid got a little cut on his arm from a nasty mesquite. I wiped it clean with an old fast food napkin I found in the floorboard.

 

I carry spare batteries for the GPS (since I get very lost very quickly!) and a Leatherman. The kid has his Yoda stick, and since he claims he's a Jedi Knight, he says we don't need anything else. (But you reminded me that I should probably have some tape. What the Force can't fix, a roll of 2" can! icon_wink.gif)

 

**********************

Geocaching by day...hockey at night!

Life is good icon_biggrin.gif

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quote:
I'm assuming you mean an ET or endotracheal tube. Do you also carry some means of ventilating through it? How 'bout the laryngoscope blade? Stethoscope for auscultating lung sounds to confirm placement? Seems like a lot of excess *stuff* for something that you'd seldom use on a backcountry trip let alone a short stroll in the woods to find a cache.

 

I was curious about that myself. But then again, I'm the one who used to carry (in my car) not only a fully stocked jump kit (Yeah, with IV stuff too!), but I had IV hooks hung on my trunk lid, just waiting for the day I drove up on the Big One! icon_biggrin.gificon_wink.gif

 

I'm burned out now. When I go caching or camping, I have a few old bandaids thrown in a baggie with a couple of Benadryl and Immodium. icon_biggrin.gif

I'm so bad that the last time we went caching, my kid got a little cut on his arm from a nasty mesquite. I wiped it clean with an old fast food napkin I found in the floorboard.

 

I carry spare batteries for the GPS (since I get very lost very quickly!) and a Leatherman. The kid has his Yoda stick, and since he claims he's a Jedi Knight, he says we don't need anything else. (But you reminded me that I should probably have some tape. What the Force can't fix, a roll of 2" can! icon_wink.gif)

 

**********************

Geocaching by day...hockey at night!

Life is good icon_biggrin.gif

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The vast majoirity of caches in this area are under a half male from the parking lot. For those I just bring a bag of tradeables and a water bottle if its real hot.

 

For caches that are a longer hike, I throw on my day pack which usually has water, well stocked first aid kit, emergency whistle, poncho, some power bars, an emergency "space blanket" and my fire starter kit (waterproof, wind resistant matches, cotton balls soaked in petrolium jelly,waterproof firesticks, fire starting gel, Bic lighter and a flint and steel device). I also carry a trekking pole and my Swiss Army Kinfe.

 

In winter I add extra clothing and a waterproof shell. An old CD also makes a good signal mirror

 

"Life is a daring adventure, or it is nothing" - Helen Kelle

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Even if you don't think you'll be "that long," it's a good idea to pack a dose or two of medications that might be needed in the next few hours. Many times I thought I was on a hunt that would take thirty minutes only to be hiking out in the dark. And accidents can happen, too, that might extend your time in the woods.

 

The whistle is also a good idea. Lots of times the cell phone can't get reception in some of the mountainous areas. I've got a piercing emergency boating whistle that takes up a tiny amount of room in the pack, but is good insurance.

 

Although not technically a "safety" item, my walking stick is very useful in poking into crevices or holes where the cache might be (and where snakes and other critters might also be). It also helps me to climb and descend more safely. I've got a couple of sticks, but my favorite for geocaching is made of a cactus rib. It's super lightweight (about 8 oz) and very strong. I'm not as lithe and supple as I used to be (was I ever?) and find this stick invaluable nowadays.

 

Final note - put one of those little rolls of camping toilet tissue in your pack. It's just not safe to use...uh..."make do" (or is that make doo?) items. icon_wink.gif

 

-honeychile-

 

'*+.,_,.+*'`'*+.,_A joyful heart is good medicine!_,.+*'`'*+.,_,.+*'`

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Even if you don't think you'll be "that long," it's a good idea to pack a dose or two of medications that might be needed in the next few hours. Many times I thought I was on a hunt that would take thirty minutes only to be hiking out in the dark. And accidents can happen, too, that might extend your time in the woods.

 

The whistle is also a good idea. Lots of times the cell phone can't get reception in some of the mountainous areas. I've got a piercing emergency boating whistle that takes up a tiny amount of room in the pack, but is good insurance.

 

Although not technically a "safety" item, my walking stick is very useful in poking into crevices or holes where the cache might be (and where snakes and other critters might also be). It also helps me to climb and descend more safely. I've got a couple of sticks, but my favorite for geocaching is made of a cactus rib. It's super lightweight (about 8 oz) and very strong. I'm not as lithe and supple as I used to be (was I ever?) and find this stick invaluable nowadays.

 

Final note - put one of those little rolls of camping toilet tissue in your pack. It's just not safe to use...uh..."make do" (or is that make doo?) items. icon_wink.gif

 

-honeychile-

 

'*+.,_,.+*'`'*+.,_A joyful heart is good medicine!_,.+*'`'*+.,_,.+*'`

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quote:
Originally posted by Criminal:

 

I could understand a pack full of provisions if the caches was three or four miles away, but that’s not been a problem so far for me. Most of the caches I’ve read about are less than a mile or so away from where you park.

 


 

If the cache is close, I don't take the kit, but I prefer the caches that are long hikes. I'm guessing that about 1/4 of the caches I've gone after have been > 3 miles in one direction.

 

and almost every one that's not been urban has been in an area with no cell phone coverage.

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quote:
Originally posted by GeoStars:

Seems like a lot of excess *stuff* for something that you'd seldom use on a backcountry trip let alone a short stroll in the woods to find a cache.


 

City-folks take a short stroll in the woods. Out here, we don't even have woods. If you really want to know, look up the topo map of N. Franklin Mountain. Follow the cottonwood springs trail from Trans Mountain Road, east across Mundy's Gap, and down to the tin mines. From there, head north across the Triple-B cattle ranch till you hit Anthony Gap road. Nice trails. Mostly no cell phone coverage. Not many ways to get a 4wd in. Rescue comes in 3 flavors. 1 - County Mountain Rescue - on foot. 2 - Ranchers - on horseback. 3 - U.S. Army Medivac (Dustoff) choppers. Fortunately, my ham radio will also call on the dustoff freqs, and my training in the army also covered calling in and directing rescue choppers. Out here in the canyons and spurs, you are lucky to average 1 to 1.5 MPH on the trails. And you are at the mercy of the terrain, counting only on what you took with you. Dangerous? No. But anything can happen, and maybe not to me and my party, but someone else... hiker - rancher - whoever. Being lost or injured in the desert, in August, is no joke. So, yes... I probably do carry a few ounces more than you do. I can handle it, even at 106 deg F.

 

I cary a bigger first aid kit for the same reason I carry a pistol, for the same reason I cary a spare tire and flat sealer in my jeep. I would rather have it and not need it, instead of need it and not have it. We don't have a 7-11 on every corner out here. I prefer to rely on myself right now rather than someone else whenever they get there. Actually, more Americans should do that too.

 

I do admit, I carry way too much stuff for a "short stroll through the woods." I do way more hiking than I do Geocaching, and most of it is 10 miles or more because everything out here is 10 miles or more. We have even left the jeep at the ranger station on one side of the mountain and had a friend pick us up on the other side the next day, so it is not just a short stroll. Having lived in IL/IN myself, I can assure you there is nothing like this area there.

 

The sad part is, if I ever buy it out here, it will probably be in a mannor that not even the stuff I cary can help me with. But as my first post stated. If I can stop the bleeding, treat for shock, and call for help, I have 99% of it licked.

 

Mike. KD9KC.

El Paso, Texas.

 

Seventeen minutes after her FIRST call for help, police officers arrived to find Ronyale White dead.

 

Prohibiting self defense is the ultimate crime. Police carry guns to protect themselves. What protects YOU ???

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quote:
Originally posted by ChazC:

KD9KC,

 

You overlook the Oro Grande National Forest! icon_wink.gif


 

Yessir.... both trees! And in case anyone doesn't know about the Oro Grande National Forest, it is two small trees on the west side of Highway 54 between Oro Grande NM, and El Paso, TX.

 

Local legend has it that originally these two trees were planted by someone who travelled highway 54 real often, and they were watered by that person. Now, however, those trees seem to survive just fine off Trucker Urin. Funny, 120,000 acres of desert to pee in, and they all pick on those two trees.

 

But then again, West Texas has been so hot and dry this year I have seen two trees fighting over a dog!

 

Y-all have a great day.

 

Mike. KD9KC.

El Paso, Texas.

 

Seventeen minutes after her FIRST call for help, police officers arrived to find Ronyale White dead.

 

Prohibiting self defense is the ultimate crime. Police carry guns to protect themselves. What protects YOU ???

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quote:
Originally posted by ChazC:

KD9KC,

 

You overlook the Oro Grande National Forest! icon_wink.gif


 

Yessir.... both trees! And in case anyone doesn't know about the Oro Grande National Forest, it is two small trees on the west side of Highway 54 between Oro Grande NM, and El Paso, TX.

 

Local legend has it that originally these two trees were planted by someone who travelled highway 54 real often, and they were watered by that person. Now, however, those trees seem to survive just fine off Trucker Urin. Funny, 120,000 acres of desert to pee in, and they all pick on those two trees.

 

But then again, West Texas has been so hot and dry this year I have seen two trees fighting over a dog!

 

Y-all have a great day.

 

Mike. KD9KC.

El Paso, Texas.

 

Seventeen minutes after her FIRST call for help, police officers arrived to find Ronyale White dead.

 

Prohibiting self defense is the ultimate crime. Police carry guns to protect themselves. What protects YOU ???

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Originally posted by KD9KC:

quote:
City-folks take a short stroll in the woods. Out here, we don't even have woods. Mostly no cell phone coverage. Not many ways to get a 4wd in. Rescue comes in 3 flavors. 1 - County Mountain Rescue - on foot. 2 - Ranchers - on horseback. 3 - U.S. Army Medivac (Dustoff) choppers. Fortunately, my ham radio will also call on the dustoff freqs, and my training in the army also covered calling in and directing rescue choppers. Out here in the canyons and spurs, you are lucky to average 1 to 1.5 MPH on the trails. And you are at the mercy of the terrain, counting only on what you took with you. Dangerous? No. But anything can happen, and maybe not to me and my party, but someone else... hiker - rancher - whoever. Being lost or injured in the desert, in August, is no joke. So, yes... I probably do carry a few ounces more than you do. I can handle it, even at 106 deg F.


 

I reread my original post and realized I came across sounding pretty snippy which wasn't my intent. I never meant to imply that you were carrying this stuff for a 1/4 mile jaunt in the local parks. The ET tube just struck me as an odd thing to carry. As I'm sure you know, it requires extra supplies and is something that you need regular practice and experience with to be able to use quickly and correctly. It's been my experience that unless someone is in full arrest (which in the backcountry is tantamount to a death sentence) you almost always need paralizing agents to be able to intubate. I've also yet to run across an intubation scenario where suction (usually LOTS of it) isn't needed. In my larger jump kit (which I keep in whatever vehicle we happen to be driving) I do keep oral and nasal airways which are helpful for keeping an airway open in the case of someone being unconscious. They are small and don't require any additional equipment to use.

 

quote:
Having lived in IL/IN myself, I can assure you there is nothing like this area there.


 

Having been a military brat, I can assure you that I know that all of the US isn't like the midwest! I don't know that I want to live in the desert (haven't been to one so can't say) but I do wish we had areas where you could go hiking for a few days (or more) and not see another human being. I lived in Colorado for a time and fell in love with the mountains. My husband and I did some traveling and backcountry hiking in our pre-kid days and plan on continuing as the kids get older and more capable. We regularly go on day-hikes and will add backpack camping to our activities list in the near future. I'm planning my first backpack camp outing (sans kiddos) next summer. As the hikes get longer and more remote, I'm sure my first aid supply list will grow.

 

quote:
I prefer to rely on myself right now rather than someone else whenever they get there. Actually, more Americans should do that too.


 

I couldn't agree more.

 

quote:
If I can stop the bleeding, treat for shock, and call for help, I have 99% of it licked.


 

Absolutely. These are basic things that anyone can learn and apply. I have to admit that communication (calling for help) would be my hardest problem to solve. The HAM stuff sounds great! I may have to look into it...

 

GeoMedic - team leader of GeoStars

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Originally posted by Stargazer21:

quote:
The kid has his Yoda stick, and since he claims he's a Jedi Knight, he says we don't need anything else. (But you reminded me that I should probably have some tape. What the Force can't fix, a roll of 2" can! )


 

We recently went for on a cache hunt where daylight was fading fast. Found the cache just as the sun went down but had to find our way back in the dark. And yes, I once again had forgotten to mark a waypoint for the truck! We had a flashlight but this was mostly a bushwack situation so no trail to follow. We had a compass which pointed us in the right direction but everything looks different after dark. My 5yo wouldn't let go of my hand but assured me he wasn't scared. He told me in no uncertain terms that jedi's aren't afraid of anything! icon_biggrin.gif My 7yo thought the whole thing was really cool and wants to do more night caching!

 

quote:
...I'm the one who used to carry (in my car) not only a fully stocked jump kit (Yeah, with IV stuff too!), but I had IV hooks hung on my trunk lid, just waiting for the day I drove up on the Big One!


 

LOL!! So, did you ever come across the Big One? I carry a pretty good jump kit in my van but try to avoid things that can expire. I do have an ambu bag that I picked up at work. Once things have been opened, they can't be reused even if we don't use them. Who knows, maybe it'll come in handy some day!

 

quote:
I'm burned out now. When I go caching or camping, I have a few old bandaids thrown in a baggie with a couple of Benadryl and Immodium.


 

I'm sure you still have the most important thing as far as first aid - knowledge. I worked for a couple of years on a under-staffed and under-funded volunteer fire/rescue squad. Improvising was the name of the game! It was great experience and taught me to think on my feet. It also makes me better appreciate my fully stocked ambulance and, even better, partners to work with these days!

 

GeoMedic - team leader of GeoStars

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Originally posted by Stargazer21:

quote:
The kid has his Yoda stick, and since he claims he's a Jedi Knight, he says we don't need anything else. (But you reminded me that I should probably have some tape. What the Force can't fix, a roll of 2" can! )


 

We recently went for on a cache hunt where daylight was fading fast. Found the cache just as the sun went down but had to find our way back in the dark. And yes, I once again had forgotten to mark a waypoint for the truck! We had a flashlight but this was mostly a bushwack situation so no trail to follow. We had a compass which pointed us in the right direction but everything looks different after dark. My 5yo wouldn't let go of my hand but assured me he wasn't scared. He told me in no uncertain terms that jedi's aren't afraid of anything! icon_biggrin.gif My 7yo thought the whole thing was really cool and wants to do more night caching!

 

quote:
...I'm the one who used to carry (in my car) not only a fully stocked jump kit (Yeah, with IV stuff too!), but I had IV hooks hung on my trunk lid, just waiting for the day I drove up on the Big One!


 

LOL!! So, did you ever come across the Big One? I carry a pretty good jump kit in my van but try to avoid things that can expire. I do have an ambu bag that I picked up at work. Once things have been opened, they can't be reused even if we don't use them. Who knows, maybe it'll come in handy some day!

 

quote:
I'm burned out now. When I go caching or camping, I have a few old bandaids thrown in a baggie with a couple of Benadryl and Immodium.


 

I'm sure you still have the most important thing as far as first aid - knowledge. I worked for a couple of years on a under-staffed and under-funded volunteer fire/rescue squad. Improvising was the name of the game! It was great experience and taught me to think on my feet. It also makes me better appreciate my fully stocked ambulance and, even better, partners to work with these days!

 

GeoMedic - team leader of GeoStars

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quote:
Originally posted by Marty Fouts:

 

If the cache is close, I don't take the kit, but I prefer the caches that are long hikes. I'm guessing that about 1/4 of the caches I've gone after have been > 3 miles in one direction.

 

and almost every one that's not been urban has been in an area with no cell phone coverage.


 

I often use a Geocache hunt as an excuse for, or as a point of interest on a much longer hike. Geocaching has been an aid to discover new areas for hiking, not always end in itself.

 

Not all cell phone carriers are created equally Cingular GSM, Voicestream, T-Mobile or digital only Sprint handsets have VERY limted rural/off highway use. A carrier with back up ANALOG roaming like, Verizon, ATT, and analog enabled TDMA/Cingular and Sprint, are much better choices for more out of the way cell coverage.

 

I'm amazed where Verizon analog coverage is available in the hills around the Bay Area. ATT is good too. Sometimes there is just no cell tower nearby though. Walking higher up a hill is often the key to getting a cellular call out.

 

ANY cell phone can dial 911 for free, (even old unactivated cell phones) but have to use a compatible network, of which there are several in the US. Analog capable phones have the greatest coverage. Test calls can be made to 611 (customer service), NOT 911.

There is no call back number available with unactivated cell phones. Unactivated phones phones benifit from having their numbers reprogrammed to 123-456-7890 (universal unactivated cell number). This may allow for non-emergency credit card calls to be made as well. Generalized info... YRMV.

---------

Greenjeens

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quote:
Originally posted by Criminal:

Just bring the toothless helper monkey. He can run for help, screech really loud, and render aid to you if it becomes necessary.

 

The first time I saw this come up in the forums was http://opentopic.Groundspeak.com/0/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=1750973553&f=3000917383&m=2700927125&r=4710963325#4710963325


 

Speaking of "accidents" and "risks" in a broader terms. No one has mentioned bringing along condoms?

Never can tell what that "Helper Monkey" has been/will get up to:>

----------

Greenjeens

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First, my intentions with the monkey are purely platonic, but I have to ask. Do they make them small enough for a tiny helper monkey?

 

><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><

What is the price of experience, do men buy it for a song,

Or wisdom for a dance in the street.................

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quote:
Originally posted by Greenjeens:

Speaking of "accidents" and "risks" in a broader terms. No one has mentioned bringing along condoms?


 

Well, if you're going that way, don't forget your travel size bottle of Astroglide...

 

-------------------------------------

Becky Davis

San Jose, CA

Cache 'n' carry... My 4 year old!

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