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Concerning Plastic Containers


Bjorn74
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I read a post about problems with plastic containers leaking and thought I'd chime in. Of course in the real world, every plastic container is caller "Tupperware" although if you were to buy Tupperware for a cache, I'd call you an idiot. And I sell the stuff... icon_razz.gif

 

However, if you want to hide a plastic container, Tupperware does have some critical advise to pass on...

 

Round containers have better seals against air and water than rectangles or squares. (I know that squares are a subset, but some think they're differant.) If you're interested in the real stuff I found a container that might be up to the job and in the right price range, but I need to field test it first. Round is bound to stay the way you left the loot. (sorry, couldn't keep it up!)

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I don't see why using real Tupperware would make one an idiot. I use it at home and it seems to seal a lot better than most other plastic containers. The only plastic container I found that comes close to sealing as well as Tupperware is the Rubbermaid "serving savers" with the blue rim.

 

Now Gladware et.al. is a different story. I don't like it at all. I've rarely found a Gladware cache that didn't leak. Maybe its OK for an urban cache that is likely to be stolen, or if you're able to make frequent maintenance visits, but outside that its pretty useless. Same goes for the deli and Chinese food containers. They seal pretty well at first, but the lid splits easily.

 

Ammo boxes are still the best, but if you must use plastic, please use a quality container.

 

"Life is a daring adventure, or it is nothing" - Helen Keller

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quote:
Originally posted by BrianSnat:

The only plastic container I found that comes close to sealing as well as Tupperware is the Rubbermaid "serving savers" with the blue rim.


 

Yep, the blue-rimmed Rubbermail is good stuff. I used it for my last cache. Here in the Northeast, we cache in mighty cold weather and plastic containers crack all the time. The Rubbermaid stays much more flexible in sub-freezing temps. You can also find it in a wide variety of sizes/shapes.

 

I think the earlier statement about Tupperware relates to the cost. It is pretty durable, and comes in more colors! This cache of mine is in a colorful Tupperware container (see pics).

 

-WR

 

"Why worry when you can obsess?"

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Most plastic containers that would be used for a cache are either a vinyl (PVC) or a pollypropylene (PPE) both are very durable and plialbe materials which make them easy to stretch fit re. a lid that seals. They are approved for food use by the FDA which is why most containers are made from them. But in the elements they "leak" chemicals that make them pliable. The more sun exposure they have the faster they leak these chemicals. The plastic cache failures I have found most often occur due to the plastic becoing brittle and developing tiny cracks. Thus allowing water to enter the cache. the seals are usually stil very good and problby wouldn't leak water. but with a tiny crack in the lid if there is water on top of the container when its warm and it cools in the evening it will suck the water through the crack. Some water will escape again in evaporation but most of it will just condence on the lid and fall back into the bottom of the container. I would not leave a plastic cache in place for more than 6 months without replacing the container due to these tiny cracks.

 

Eeyore

 

It took a GPS to get me away from technology.

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Originally posted by Bjorn74:

I read a post about problems with plastic containers leaking and thought I'd chime in. Of course in the real world, every plastic container is caller "Tupperware" although if you were to buy Tupperware for a cache, I'd call you an idiot. And I sell the stuff...QUOTE]

 

I assume you mean it's too much money to spend on a cache container? Possibly in most cases. I found a cache a few days ago that had just been restocked with about $50 - $80 worth of tools, I would tend to think an expensive container was justified for that one.

 

http://huzzah.livejournal.com/

http://custer.webhop.net/

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I like using the plastic containers of dry roasted peanuts in bulk. They are about 6" by 6" by 8" high, have a screw on lid and a very large opening. Besides they are left over and as long as I eat the peanuts, I get more cache containers.

I do not see the sun contributing to the degredation of the plastic too much as most caches are hidden where the sun don't shine (sorry about that). And most people know that plastics, unfortunately,(or fortunately for us) do not decompose too well unless exposed.

I think the free part helps too.

I must have about 10 of these containers hidden and 6 standing by.

 

nscaler

"Anyone not here, raise your hand!".

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I haven't been at this too, only found 7 caches (out of seven searches), 4 were in ammo cans and completely dry... Other three were in "plastic" and all three had condensation in them (one was actually had a puddle of water in corner)..

 

Coincidence?

 

Dale

 

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I'm Diagonally Parked, In A Parallel Universe.

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