Jump to content

Do you read the physical logbooks?


rdw
Followers 0

Recommended Posts

My first few caches, I didn't read them... I figured I'd read them online, since my own physical log entries were very similar to my virtual log entries. I've since learned that many, (in fact, most probably) cachers don't log online. If they do, it's often a little different than the physical log entry.

 

Since then, my physical log entries have become much shorter and my virtual log entries are now much longer.

 

I like to read stuff, and I like to see what kind of experience other people have had searching for a particular cache.

 

Jamie

Link to comment

The first few caches I found, I was too exhilerated with the find to even think about reading. I did look at them, but only briefly. Since then I have found that the entries in the physical logbook give a more personal experience to the cache history itself.

Link to comment

It sort of depends. If I am at a cache where I won't be seen, my kids aren't with me, I have time, and the weather is cooperating, I'll read the entire log book. If the kids are with me, I barely have time to write in the log, let alone read it, before they want to run off to the nearest playground. It just depends on what kind of a day I'm having! icon_wink.gif

 

25021_1200.gif

Link to comment

It sort of depends. If I am at a cache where I won't be seen, my kids aren't with me, I have time, and the weather is cooperating, I'll read the entire log book. If the kids are with me, I barely have time to write in the log, let alone read it, before they want to run off to the nearest playground. It just depends on what kind of a day I'm having! icon_wink.gif

 

25021_1200.gif

Link to comment

Absolutely!!! It's a major part of the experience. That's one of the downsides of being a First Finder or one of the early ones. I'm in no hurry during my cache hunts, and I typically spend a lot of time poking around the site, taking photos and enjoying the views (if any). Some of these places I many never visit again. I've found that most people write something entirely different in the logbook than in thier logs on the cache page, and the logbook comments are more spontaneous. Cheers ...

 

~Rich in NEPA~

 

1132_1200.jpg

 

=== A man with a GPS receiver knows where he is; a man with two GPS receivers is never sure. ===

Link to comment

Definitely, I read the physical logbook. In fact, at my last cache find in SE Idaho I sat right down to read in a spot I THOUGHT was clear of snow, and then realized I had about a mile hike back to the car in soaking wet, COLD jeans.

 

But so many folks write more in the logbooks than they do online, when details are fresh in their minds. And there are always several entries that you won't find online at all.

 

Yep, a definite must-read!

Link to comment

We read the whole log if we can but most of the time the weather is too cold or too damp to sit there long and a few times it was getting to dark to stay (finding our way out of the woods becomes a concern). I hope this changes as the weather improves this spring and summer.

Link to comment

We like to read the logs. Screaming kids, nightfall, wicked Nor-easterners sometimes prevent us from reading. On our first find, everyone in our group read every page of that cache. We were there forever. As home duties prevent me from being a full-time cacher, I need to utilize my time wisely to get most of our trips (read: RUSH). Very sad. We are always blessed with the experiences of others when we sit down and read. It drops the stress level a bit and makes the overall trip worthwhile.

 

I think from now on I will take more time and care to read the logbooks.

 

Go! And don't be afraid to get a little wet!

Link to comment

It depends on what the weather's doing, how much daylight's left, where else I want to go, and so on. Usually I'll at least skim through the logs to see who else has visited the cache. Often I'll read everything. Only if I'm very pressed for time or it's raining and therefore difficult to keep stuff dry will I forego any log reading at all...

 

Purrs... LazyLeopard http://www.lazyleopard.org.uk

Link to comment

All too often, after making the find, I rush like crazy to sign the log with the minimum, make a quick trade, close the container, rehide it and make a hasty retreat. This for 2 reasons:

1. I don't want to be discovered by non-cachers and jeopardize the cache's security particularly when it is in a heavily travelled area.

2. Most of my hunts are during prime caching hours usually on weekends. As a courtesy to other cachers I like to exit the area so that I won't give away the location and take away from the thrill of the final discovery.

If these don't exist then I love reading all the previous entries, looking over all the loot and just generally relaxing. (Don't do enough of that)

 

Happy Caching, Olar

 

"if you come to a fork in the trail, take it!"

Link to comment

Depends on how many mosquitoes are swarming around me! Other things also, like if I have too many kids with me and I'm just trying to keep them all on the trail rather than wondering off...I don't read it. Sometimes I just browse through and see who has been there and if anyone was there that day.

Link to comment

I've only been on a few finds so far, but I have to say that without the logs the experience wouldn't be the same for me. I like to think that reading the logs gives me a sense of connection to the place I've found and to the people who have been there before me.

 

Also, in a very practical way, it helps me get aquainted with the cachers in my area. I've already recognized a few names over and over in the log, and it's lots of fun to read them and say to my partner - "Oh, this is from so-and-so"

 

And the practice of finding and trading small personal tokens and signing a log seems to me to say something about the sport - that it's not just about finding hidden treasure, but about trading thoughts and pieces of yourself with all the people to come.

 

I'm new, but I'm addicted!

 

-- Kit

(Team KITandSHAE)

 

"We are healthy only to the extent that our ideas are humane." --Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

Link to comment

I like to see who's visited before me, and if something catches my eye, or if I have time, I'll read the logs others have written.

I know my logs at the cache and on the site can differ; with one cache in particular, I hadn't seen any wildlife on the way in - just a lot of tracks. On the way out, I came across a gopher tortoise (endangered species) and stopped to watch it for a while. I was sure to include that in my online log, but it wasn't in my cache log.

Link to comment

I tend to spend 30 to 45 minutes at the cache site. I read the log book, usually in entirety, and then I'll sift through and examine cache contents. Quite often, I'll eat lunch while enjoying the scenery. I usually take a bunch of pictures of the area if I find it interesting enough.

Link to comment

Just about everytime. My daughter likes to hear what other people have written. Then I get to transfer her thoughts to the log (she gets to sign it). We have actually found notes in some that ask us to let another cacher know when we visited. They like to hear about the childrens view of our world.

 

If the area is crowded or buggy or gettting dark, we will skim it.

 

--- Mikel & ErinsWeb

Link to comment

Skim through to see who has logged the find. And, always read the entries for cachers we recognize from the local area. It's a little like checking on family ... even if we've never met.

 

One request: Wish folks would enter the time of day they log their find. We followed Walkin' Stick into a cache one time ... he always caches with his dog, so I was sure it was him ... we seem to be behind him a lot. When the cache was located, sure enough he beat us to it ... if the park ranger hadn't of come along, I wouldn't have known how close behind him I really was.

 

Psst ... don't tell Walkin' Stick, but I'm sure that Jenni (his dog) is really the one responsible for all of the finds. On one of log entries he said he handed the GPSr to a stranger to help him ... the entry said he was having trouble navigating in the park ... Tsk Tsk.

 

Jeepster

- Road kill on the information highway ...

Link to comment

My first two or three cache finds I didn't read the log-book in the cache. But then I found out I missed a 'Surprise' multi-cache that you would only know about if you read the log-book...So now I take the time to read and find it very enjoyable ,and also a welcome break before starting the hike back to the car. I Love Geocaching!!!!![:-D]

Link to comment

I originally read all the logs in the books. I love to see what others have written, as well as who traded what. Then I started caching with a friend (just don't tell Eli I'm talking about her) that would bug me when I took so long reading the log book & sign. Also, during the last few months we'd end up caching too late in the day and I'd only read part of it since it would be getting dark and we'd want to leave before it got too cold.

Link to comment

I'm not sure how I missed this thread 2 weeks ago... I just stumbled across it while doing a search on... of all things: Jenni.

 

After reading Jeepsters remarks, I'd like to take a moment to defend myself... no really, I would... only problem is... just about everything he said I did that day... really DID happen ... but he makes it sound so much worse than it seemed at the time! icon_rolleyes.gif Oh well! icon_rolleyes.gif

 

In answer to the poll question... I don't read the logs... which is probably part of the reason why I don't put much in mine (including T.O.D.). Based on this thread, I may have to start spending a little more time reading them. (and... I'll try to remember to put a time in them also.)

 

Oh by the way... Since Jenni usually does lead the way to the cache... and since she is a water lovin' Golden Retriever... maybe it wasn't an accident that she took me for a stroll down the wrong side of that river rather than going to the cache! Bad Girl! Bad Jenni! icon_wink.gif

 

_____________________________________________________

 

Eagles may soar but weasles don't get sucked into jet engines!

_____________________________________________________

 

The early bird gets the worm but it's the second mouse that gets the cheese!

Link to comment

I'm not sure how I missed this thread 2 weeks ago... I just stumbled across it while doing a search on... of all things: Jenni.

 

After reading Jeepsters remarks, I'd like to take a moment to defend myself... no really, I would... only problem is... just about everything he said I did that day... really DID happen ... but he makes it sound so much worse than it seemed at the time! icon_rolleyes.gif Oh well! icon_rolleyes.gif

 

In answer to the poll question... I don't read the logs... which is probably part of the reason why I don't put much in mine (including T.O.D.). Based on this thread, I may have to start spending a little more time reading them. (and... I'll try to remember to put a time in them also.)

 

Oh by the way... Since Jenni usually does lead the way to the cache... and since she is a water lovin' Golden Retriever... maybe it wasn't an accident that she took me for a stroll down the wrong side of that river rather than going to the cache! Bad Girl! Bad Jenni! icon_wink.gif

 

_____________________________________________________

 

Eagles may soar but weasles don't get sucked into jet engines!

_____________________________________________________

 

The early bird gets the worm but it's the second mouse that gets the cheese!

Link to comment

Reading the entire log is part of our family geocache ritual (along with going to a certain un-named fastfood joint for a frosty dairy confection after a successful quest). I usually read the log aloud while the kinder look at the spoils and pick their booty (that doesn't sound right, does it...but you know what I mean icon_eek.gif. I hate some homonyms). Then I log our entry. After we leave the site, I invariably feel like I didn't see all the goodies (which is okay if it's just a bunch of used MickieD's toys). We also move away from the actual hide site before we open the cache, to ensure we have enough time to enjoy the fruit of our efforts (and yes, we are very careful to return it to its original location).

 

quote:
Originally posted by Shoebox:

We read the whole log if we can but most of the time the weather is too cold or too damp to sit there long and a few times it was getting to dark to stay (finding our way out of the woods becomes a concern). I hope this changes as the weather improves this spring and summer.


 

Of course, we don't have to worry too much about weather that is "too cold or too damp" here in Hawaii ne. We also have plenty of sunshine, what with being soooo close to the equator.

icon_wink.gif

Link to comment

Reading the entire log is part of our family geocache ritual (along with going to a certain un-named fastfood joint for a frosty dairy confection after a successful quest). I usually read the log aloud while the kinder look at the spoils and pick their booty (that doesn't sound right, does it...but you know what I mean icon_eek.gif. I hate some homonyms). Then I log our entry. After we leave the site, I invariably feel like I didn't see all the goodies (which is okay if it's just a bunch of used MickieD's toys). We also move away from the actual hide site before we open the cache, to ensure we have enough time to enjoy the fruit of our efforts (and yes, we are very careful to return it to its original location).

 

quote:
Originally posted by Shoebox:

We read the whole log if we can but most of the time the weather is too cold or too damp to sit there long and a few times it was getting to dark to stay (finding our way out of the woods becomes a concern). I hope this changes as the weather improves this spring and summer.


 

Of course, we don't have to worry too much about weather that is "too cold or too damp" here in Hawaii ne. We also have plenty of sunshine, what with being soooo close to the equator.

icon_wink.gif

Link to comment

There may be all kinds of stuff in a cache you find today. And then there's other stuff in the cache at another point in time.

 

But the log is THE LOG. It holds the history of the finds, it's where you record your experiences while things are still happening, and it’s where you become part of the cache.

 

In reading the log, you meet the people that are your follow Geocachers, you read about their families, pets, and the fun they had in coming out. You read about finds that took place on a sunny, 90 degree summer day, on another page you read about how beautiful the color of the leaves are; and there you are, in the same spot with a light snow covering all around you…...

 

Is the Log, really the Cache?

 

..and in our reminiscence, one ghost of mine -- trying to forget the failures, being forgotten after being victorious, and the many sacrifices and trials of plying my trade thousands of miles from home -- was laid to rest. - Bob Roll

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 0
×
×
  • Create New...