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Why'd you buy your GPS?


Zuckerruebensirup
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I recently had the pleasure of crossing paths for the first time with another Geocacher while we were both out searching for (or, in my case, waiting for the coast to clear so I could re-hide it after logging) a cache.

 

As we chatted for a bit and exchanged stories, he asked, "So what did you originally get your GPS for?" As it turns out, I 'borrowed' (ok, ok...took over) my husband's GPSr, which he had originally bought for marking his tree stand locations while bow hunting in a several-thousand acre public hunting area (Site M) in Illinois. Eight-Legs said that they used theirs for boating.

 

The conversation piqued my curiosity, and has made me wonder how many Geocachers previously owned GPS receivers before they learned about Geocaching, or whether it was Geocaching itself that prompted them to purchase one.

 

Please answer the following survey, and then share your story about when and why you originally purchased your GPS receiver, and what other activities you currently use it for:

 

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Join us at our first 196939_600.gif "geo-gathering" on 4/27/02!

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Mine came for free as part of a too-good-to-pass-up deal Staples had the day after Thanksgiving last year: $200 for a Palm Vx, Magellan GPS Companion, thumb keyboard, hard case, car charger, USB sync adapter, and some other stuff I've forgotten.

 

At that price, I would have bought it without the GPS Companion. Given that I'd already been eying the GPS Companion anyway (and saying "but what would I ever use one for?") I just had to have one.

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I wanted to try this geocaching thing out. I had heard about it from my friend Dekaner in NY and it really piqued my interest. I'm in dire need for some exercise and it sounded like (and is!) just plain fun.

 

So I hunted for a GPS and found a really good price on a Venture at a boating store. I grabbed the venture because it was newer than the yellow one, and quite a lot less expensive than the Legend (in this case at least).

 

I bought another Magellen 310 for visitors to use, but it's really not as good. Decent, but not as accurate as my Venture by a long shot. I have no use for my GPS aside from geocaching. I've played a little bit with hooking it to my computer to aid navigation, but haven't found that to be entirely practical. MapPoint directions will generally get me where I need to go w/o the GPS attached so I don't sweat it much on the navigation end.

 

--------

trippy1976

 

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None of the options quite fit. I wanted a GPSr even before I found out about geocaching. I was planning on buying one because I go sailing in the Puget Sound as well as on the Columbia River. I also do a lot of fly fishing. I wanted one originally because my sail boat is too small to need Loran, but still something for navigation and for marking nice fishing spots and so on would be nice. Now, when I found out about geocaching, I borrowed my dads old magellan 300, and my wife and I tried out geocaching. We liked caching, but hated that old magellan 300 (he got it free for test driving a Lincoln a couple years ago, but he never uses it because he has a better one) , so I finally had my wifes approval to go get the GPSr I always wanted, because she wanted a better GPSr so we could do more geocaches. icon_smile.gif

 

ummmm....not sure what to say here....so ummm, well errrr, uhhhh, well I guess that's it.

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None of the options quite fit. I wanted a GPSr even before I found out about geocaching. I was planning on buying one because I go sailing in the Puget Sound as well as on the Columbia River. I also do a lot of fly fishing. I wanted one originally because my sail boat is too small to need Loran, but still something for navigation and for marking nice fishing spots and so on would be nice. Now, when I found out about geocaching, I borrowed my dads old magellan 300, and my wife and I tried out geocaching. We liked caching, but hated that old magellan 300 (he got it free for test driving a Lincoln a couple years ago, but he never uses it because he has a better one) , so I finally had my wifes approval to go get the GPSr I always wanted, because she wanted a better GPSr so we could do more geocaches. icon_smile.gif

 

ummmm....not sure what to say here....so ummm, well errrr, uhhhh, well I guess that's it.

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I had brought my GPSr back in July,2001 for use on my Mountain and Road bikes. Trail mapping and recording of routes riden while cycling.

 

Found out about Geocaching in August while I still have my 1st GPSr Garmin Legend, I have since add a Vista in order to hold more maps for Cycling trips.

 

BB

 

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If it's not one thing, then it's another...

 

[This message was edited by Buckaroo Banzai on April 17, 2002 at 11:39 AM.]

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I bought my unit for 2 reasons....

 

1. I was tired of going geocaching and having to wait back with the slow members of the family while my husband ran off...in a straight line...so he could keep his "fix".

 

2. I get lost in my own backyard. so when I read the specs on the Garmin V I just had to have it...

 

Well husband has just finished reading all about it and showing it to his buddies (he has a garmin III+ that I bought him for christmas 2 years ago) now it is in my van all the time....so when I haven't a clue on where I am and how to get home...I just turn it on click find home and it beeps each time I need to turn......I love this thing!!

 

Dx

 

"Have you no news on your travels?" the Book of fairy & folk tales of Ireland (1888)

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Bought my first personal GPS back in 1995 Garmin 38 (Good for it's day ... but it really sucks by today's standards) ... I've since given it away but still have every other GPS I've owned ... a Garmin 12xl, 12Map and a Vista. Waiting for that 76s to hit it's second production run! I originally got a GPS because of the overseas traveling I did then ... lot of back country with no real maps to speak of ... as well as backpacking in the states ... oh, and I'm a serious gadget junkie.

 

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My wife bought me my first GPSR (Magellan MAP 410) a few years ago, just because it was such a cool gadget she knew I'd love it (a combination of maps, computer, etc; can't go wrong there!).

After geocaching for a while I decided to upgrade...my first choice was an inexpensive MAP 330X package, but when the closeout deal at Staples fell through (no inventory) I went with a Meridian instead. Very happy with it...

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I'd been reading about the GPS system and GPSr's in Popular Science for years, but could never justify the expense - another cool gadget, but not much I could do with it (I didn't do much hiking, and I'm good with directions and maps, so I didn't need it for driving.) Then I was taken Geocaching, and suddenly I had a really good reason for getting one. icon_biggrin.gif

The same idea applies to my digital camera - now I have fun activities and events to take pictures of and post on the internet.

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I'd been reading about the GPS system and GPSr's in Popular Science for years, but could never justify the expense - another cool gadget, but not much I could do with it (I didn't do much hiking, and I'm good with directions and maps, so I didn't need it for driving.) Then I was taken Geocaching, and suddenly I had a really good reason for getting one. icon_biggrin.gif

The same idea applies to my digital camera - now I have fun activities and events to take pictures of and post on the internet.

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I'm just a geek. I had a GPS long before Geocaching even existed. I love gadgetts. Anything electronic and handheld I have/had or will have one. Geocaching was started as and idea to get geeks away from there computer and get a little exercise.

 

mcb

 

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GPS-Yote

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I didn't buy my first one. I placed a large order for some outdoor gear and one of the items I ordered was a weather/storm radio. Imagine my suprise when I got a Garmin 12 instead. I mulled it over for a while and then call the company and told them about the mistake. They gave me the option of keeping the GPS, so I did. After about 10 finds I upgraded to a Legend and have used it ever since. icon_biggrin.gif

 

We don't stop playing because we get old, we get old because we stop playing.

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I didn't buy my first one. I placed a large order for some outdoor gear and one of the items I ordered was a weather/storm radio. Imagine my suprise when I got a Garmin 12 instead. I mulled it over for a while and then call the company and told them about the mistake. They gave me the option of keeping the GPS, so I did. After about 10 finds I upgraded to a Legend and have used it ever since. icon_biggrin.gif

 

We don't stop playing because we get old, we get old because we stop playing.

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I have a Handspring Visor, which is just like a Palm except that is has a cool "Springboard" module connector. I bought the Visor because of this feature. After about 18 months I finally decided that I wasn't going to buy a camera, cell phone, extra memory, or the Tiger Woods golf game to actually use the feature. So the geek in me decided I needed a GPS to stick in the back. After another 8-12 months I heard about this curious thing called geocaching and now I use my Visor mostly to store memos (rather than carry printouts), and host my GPSr.

 

Oh, I also had to go buy some AAA NimH batteries icon_wink.gif

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I have a Handspring Visor, which is just like a Palm except that is has a cool "Springboard" module connector. I bought the Visor because of this feature. After about 18 months I finally decided that I wasn't going to buy a camera, cell phone, extra memory, or the Tiger Woods golf game to actually use the feature. So the geek in me decided I needed a GPS to stick in the back. After another 8-12 months I heard about this curious thing called geocaching and now I use my Visor mostly to store memos (rather than carry printouts), and host my GPSr.

 

Oh, I also had to go buy some AAA NimH batteries icon_wink.gif

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I bought my Garmin GPS II+ a few years back to augment my map and compass that I always have for backpacking, driving, etc., so I already had it when I heard about geocaching--normally the gps-r was just gathering dust unless I was travelling. Recently, my fiancée wanted her own gps-r for caching, so rather than get her an inexpensive new one, I upgraded to a eTrex Vista and gave her my old one. Happy cachin'!!! 15T

 

www.1800goguard.com

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I bought a Delorme Earthmate a few years ago to use with my Palm III and a laptop to track back country trails and good camping spots. It worked allright for what I used it for at the time. A few months ago I stumbled across Geocaching.com noticed that there was a cache in my neighborhood and by gosh, I had to find it! I borrowed my Grandfathers Magellan ColorTrak to begin geocaching until I could hunt down the ellusive Magellan Meridian Platinum (sure, now you can find them, but try finding one at the beginning of March 2002!). I did a few caches with the ColorTrak, finally got my Platinum (world of difference!) and have been on the hunt ever since.

 

Later,

TikimanHSA (Hunter)

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quote:
Originally posted by Zuckerruebensirup:

Isn't it nice to have an 'excuse' to buy those gadgets that we just HAVE to have? icon_biggrin.gif


 

What's worse is that before I changed jobs, about four years ago, I was responsible for all of the GPS functionality of a little agricultural GIS program I don't want to talk about. So I'd played with GPS before, during the dark days of Selective Availability, and never found any non-work uses for it then, either. Even the $20,000 subcentimeter survey-grade differential GPS I had bouncing around my office for a few months back then didn't strike me as a particularly useful piece of hardware outside of a tractor or a combine. So when I asked myself "but what would I ever do with one?" I was speaking from experience.

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quote:
Originally posted by Zuckerruebensirup:

Isn't it nice to have an 'excuse' to buy those gadgets that we just HAVE to have? icon_biggrin.gif


 

What's worse is that before I changed jobs, about four years ago, I was responsible for all of the GPS functionality of a little agricultural GIS program I don't want to talk about. So I'd played with GPS before, during the dark days of Selective Availability, and never found any non-work uses for it then, either. Even the $20,000 subcentimeter survey-grade differential GPS I had bouncing around my office for a few months back then didn't strike me as a particularly useful piece of hardware outside of a tractor or a combine. So when I asked myself "but what would I ever do with one?" I was speaking from experience.

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I bought our first GPSR way back in 1994, to use for navigation on a series of summer long motorhome trips. The first unit we owned was a Garmin GPS40 (or was it a GPS38?) with an external antenna which got tucked up under the fiberglas motorhome roof.

 

When the first unit failed, we replaced it with a Garmin GPSIII, which we still use. One nice feature of the GPSIII is it has several timers which count when it's turned on, on battery power, etc. Right now, the time it's been on since it was manufactured is 982 hours, 31 minutes, 36 seconds. I'm surprised it's so low.

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I received my Emap as a Xmas gift from my wife in 2000. She bought it for me because I am a technology buff but I really had no uses for it at the time. I first heard of geocaching about 9 months ago and was interested in it but family issues precluded me from giving it try (not to mention the 100+ degree wheather out here). In February of this year I finally gave it a try and I am hooked!

 

I looked into upgrading my Emap but found that I really didn't need anymore that what I have for my purposes. I now have my mom, my brother and coworkers interested in the game/sport. I'm very glad my wife bought it for me!

 

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Get on with Living or Get on with Dying...

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A few years ago Anne was talking like she thought a GPSr would be something to have. We do a lot of hiking and backpacking. Being the kind thoughtful soul that I am, I got her a Magellan ColorTrac for Christmas. Must have been 1998, 97. SA was still active. We'd play this thing but lost a lot of faith in it's ability to do us much good. Then SA was lifted and we heard about geocaching. After we found the first cache trust in the old ColorTrac came. Earlier this year I (Byron) upgraded my Palm 105 to Handspring Visor Pro and added a Magellan GPS Companion. Often we carry both GPSrs with us when goecaching. We won't carry the ColorTrac when backpacking, it's just to big and heavy, but since I'll be carring the Visor, (books to read) I can carry the GPS Companion with very little added weight or bulk.

 

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I bought a Magellan 2000 several years ago to document potential high power rocket launch sites. The FAA requires the precise location of launches for the launch permit application. I used it geocaching for about one month before finding a used Trex (Yellow) on eBay. The Mag 2000 will be placed in a future cache of mine as a (sort of) high dollar trinket.

 

Lou

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I bought my litle yellow eTrex in order to be better able to place caches. I was actually doing very well finding them without one (33 finds). To date, I've used it for about 35% of the caches I've found.

 

I now also use is for hiking and will be using it to assist in field checking orienteering maps. Plus, it's just sorta fun to play around with.

 

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I purchased mine for a trip my family is planning for this summer through the west (USA, that is). I found the link to this site when I logged onto Garmin to make sure my softwares were all up to date.

 

I've only logged 4 caches since I first started, but I'm hooked and I think I've hooked my brother, too.

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A couple of years ago, we were planning a vacation to Alabama. (Lake Gunthersville State Park & Huntsville Space Center) I usually got the latest version of the Delorme Steet Atlas before vacation to map out our trips. The CompUSA had the version with the Earthmate plus the Palm interface for $125. (It included the software too.) I bought it.

 

My wife Jeri thought it was great. She usually hate the tecnology toys I buy. We used have used it for several vacations. I always take it even on trips where we fly and rent a car.

 

See my most recent Las Vegas vacation photos...

http://wok.nwsc.k12.in.us/Vegas/index.htm

(Canon G2 PowerShot Digital Camera)

 

I ride a bike on the road and thought about getting one and when we are in the Honda Civic, the laptop and Earthmate GPS is too bulky. I popped for a Garmin eTrex Vista last week.

 

I mentioned to my wife (Jeri) that there must be some "game" that can be played with a GPS so I typed "GPS Game" at Google and here I am. I hope to do my first search (find!) this weekend.

 

My wife thinks it will be fun too!

 

The best things in life are not things...

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I was visiting a friend back in my hometown of Pittsburgh last summer. Went to the new ballpark Saturday night, then, got a copy of the Sunday paper the next morning. It had an article about geocaching and it sounded like a lot of fun.

 

I had some American Express gift certificates that I got at work over a period of time, and also a gift certificate at a particular shopping area in downtown Philadelphia. I rarely get downtown, even when our one office was across the street. I had looked around once, but didn't buy anything. By last summer, it was due to expire. Then I read the article in the Pittsburgh paper, and remembered that there was a Rand-McNally Travel Store in that mall. So, I put together all the certificates and got a Garmin Legend.

 

Been some of the best non-money spent. Family gets outs and hikes in the woods. I can even usually interest my teen-ager for a whole five minutes at a time (sometimes less, if friends go on the search).

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I bought a handheld GPSR a few years back after using mouted versions on boats and then later usinga friends handheld unit while trekking in the Rockies. I liked the added safety of having it along for big hikes out in the mountains. I go out to Colorado quite a bit and hike all over the place. Since I dont know the terrain as well as the locals, it made sense to carry a security policy with me...it's called an Etrex! Back home, I do a lot of hiking in north NJ and NY state. I have always navigated by map and compass, and for the most part still do...but having a waypoint set for a camp is a wonderful luxary.

 

It wasnt until much later that I discover geocaching. Admittedly, my GPS gets more use for caching these days than it does for hikes alone. icon_biggrin.gif

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I bought a handheld GPSR a few years back after using mouted versions on boats and then later usinga friends handheld unit while trekking in the Rockies. I liked the added safety of having it along for big hikes out in the mountains. I go out to Colorado quite a bit and hike all over the place. Since I dont know the terrain as well as the locals, it made sense to carry a security policy with me...it's called an Etrex! Back home, I do a lot of hiking in north NJ and NY state. I have always navigated by map and compass, and for the most part still do...but having a waypoint set for a camp is a wonderful luxary.

 

It wasnt until much later that I discover geocaching. Admittedly, my GPS gets more use for caching these days than it does for hikes alone. icon_biggrin.gif

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I've been competing in orienteering since 1972, so I already had an interest in navigation in the woods. When a friend borrowed an eTrex Vista from someone, to try it out, and I saw that little handy unit, I wanted one. Bought four of them in the States (not to use all of them myself!), to save some money for each, compared to what they cost here in Sweden. They have the wrong basemap, but at least they are correct each time you go to the States again.

 

Before, when SA was active, I saw no use for a GPS. Also, I thought they were a little too bulky to take in your hand and go out running. But an eTrex has a covenient size.

 

After I got the GPS, or actually after I decided getting one, I learned about geocaching. Ans since it's really tech-orienteering, it suits me very well. Although I've noticed that my mind works just like it does in orienteering, where we want to keep luck out of it. Since the precision of maps is no better than the precision of a GPS, we argue that when you are within 10 meters or so, the flag should be obvious. On the other hand, when geocaching, coming within 10 meters is the easy part. But I like geocaching more for coming to places I wouldn't have visited otherwise, rather than having to crawl around an lift 1763 rocks before finding the correct one.

 

Hmmm, I think I've ranted away quite a bit from the topic of this post. Let's just blame SA for my bad precision icon_wink.gif

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Anders

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I've been competing in orienteering since 1972, so I already had an interest in navigation in the woods. When a friend borrowed an eTrex Vista from someone, to try it out, and I saw that little handy unit, I wanted one. Bought four of them in the States (not to use all of them myself!), to save some money for each, compared to what they cost here in Sweden. They have the wrong basemap, but at least they are correct each time you go to the States again.

 

Before, when SA was active, I saw no use for a GPS. Also, I thought they were a little too bulky to take in your hand and go out running. But an eTrex has a covenient size.

 

After I got the GPS, or actually after I decided getting one, I learned about geocaching. Ans since it's really tech-orienteering, it suits me very well. Although I've noticed that my mind works just like it does in orienteering, where we want to keep luck out of it. Since the precision of maps is no better than the precision of a GPS, we argue that when you are within 10 meters or so, the flag should be obvious. On the other hand, when geocaching, coming within 10 meters is the easy part. But I like geocaching more for coming to places I wouldn't have visited otherwise, rather than having to crawl around an lift 1763 rocks before finding the correct one.

 

Hmmm, I think I've ranted away quite a bit from the topic of this post. Let's just blame SA for my bad precision icon_wink.gif

24148_200.jpg

 

Anders

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I bought an Eagle Explorer when they first came out (can't remember how many years ago) to make maps of our hunting area. I would convert to UTM and draw full scale maps in AutoCad then print the maps on 36" x 48" sheets. I upgraded to an E-Trex Legend when I started Geocaching.

 

Pat in Louisiana

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I never get lost. I simply investigate alternate destinations.

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but didn't really think it was necessary and couldn't justify the expense. I heard about geocaching in the highpoint forum and decided to check it out. This was shortly after Christmas and I still had the $100 my mom had given me. Someone directed me to Amazon.com which had an E-trex for $99 including shipping. Must have been fate... icon_biggrin.gif

 

BTW, my dear hubby thought that I wasted my $100. Until our first hunt anyway. Now he enjoys it as much and the rest of us.

 

GeoMedic - team leader of GeoStars

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but didn't really think it was necessary and couldn't justify the expense. I heard about geocaching in the highpoint forum and decided to check it out. This was shortly after Christmas and I still had the $100 my mom had given me. Someone directed me to Amazon.com which had an E-trex for $99 including shipping. Must have been fate... icon_biggrin.gif

 

BTW, my dear hubby thought that I wasted my $100. Until our first hunt anyway. Now he enjoys it as much and the rest of us.

 

GeoMedic - team leader of GeoStars

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I also bought our GPS just to go Geocaching. It sounded like so much fun, I ordered one off of Amazon.com even before I ever went out to find a cache to see if I liked it or not.

 

As I've posted in other threads many times before, ices_lol_ani.gif I found out about geocaching in the editors section of "Knights of the Dinner Table" a couple months ago.

 

Okami

President, C.I.A.

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I had a Garmin 90 Aviation GPS that I had used in my aircraft. After I got into the sport I purchased A Garmin Legend as it did alot better job keeping signal and displaying the last .1 to the cache..(and I like just using just 2 batteries too)..since then I think that I have helped sell at least 5 other Legends, after people saw mine.

 

barondriver1.jpg

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Im suprised nobody else had my answer, for work. I was working for bellsouth mobility in orlando installing equipment under cellular towers. Of course the directions to a cell site were usually somewhere between barely followable and pointedly wrong. So i went down to the local best buy and picked up a garmin because our site location books had lat&lon coordinates. Plug em in, and track to the tower, much nicer then driving around, and occasionally into dangerous areas.

 

[Episkipos Enos Shenk, KSC]

[403forbidden.urbanexploration.org]

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I didn't buy mine. It was a Christmas gift to me from my wife. I didn't even ask for it -- she just knew I liked gadgets (and maps and navigation). I think she is sorry that she got it though.... more time on the computer and more time out of the house playing, when I could be doing yard work!

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I am originally a "gadget guy" who loves gadgets of any type, shape, size. I first started using the GPS for our Volunteer Fire Department when we needed to give coordinates to helicopter pilots at accident scenes. The I started using it for hunting and fishing spots because I got tired of marking maps. Then I found Geocaching. There was a news story on CNN one day and it grabbed my attention. I was bitten by the bug. The rest is history.

 

phantom

 

"DOH!" -- Homer Simpson

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I am in real estate and I visit 15-20 house many days. I do this all over San Diego county. The first time I did this on my gold wing motorcycle I knew that memorizing was the map was too much for me. I went out and bought a Garmin GPS V. From the Garmin page I found the link to this site and the rest is history.

 

Birdheh

 

Howard Harris

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My wife gave me my E-trex for Christmas. Been wanting one since they first came on the market. I thought it would be useful on my hunting and fishing trips. Found the link to the geocaching site on Garmin's website. It has provided us with the opportunity to enjoy the outdoors together, rather than just me alone.

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