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2x as Active Duty Army

 

'83 - '87 as a 74F Programmer Analyst

18 months at FT Hood, TX 6 months of that TDY to Ft Greely, AK

30 months at FT Greely, AK in the Cold Regions Test Center

 

'90 - '94 as a 63J Quartermaster and Chemical Equipment Repairer

4 months in Desert Shield/Storm

4 months FT Sill, OK

40 months at FT Wainwright, AK

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Earlier today I was reading a post by Jeremy and found out something I did not know. Jeremy is a veteran. <BR><BR>Now call me shallow if you wish but knowing someone served, in whatever capacity, in our nation's forces gives them a little more credibiity with me when it comes to what they say. It sort of says they've walked the walk, not just talked the talk.<BR><BR>Does service make you a smarter individual? Does it make you better than other Americans? Do you deserve to be pampered and praised? Nah, none of the above, but it does show a certain dedication and experience that "may" be lacking in others, and in my humble opinion, it is their loss, not mine.<BR><BR>So I was wondering how many others might have served and not bothered to mention it, maybe because you don't really think it's any big deal, or you weren't in for that long, etc., or it just never came up. I think it would be interesting, at least to me, to know who has served in the military, and where, and in which service. (and yes, before anyone gets smart alecky, the Coast Guard counts...sheesh) icon_biggrin.gif<!--graemlin::huh:-->.<BR><BR>No politics, no "support the troops", no pro-war, or anti-war, just state your service and maybe when you served. My roots in Geocaching come from my service in the military, where I was first introduced to GPS technology. So it does tie into our little sport, at least for me.<BR><BR>My service was spread over the years 1975 to 2002. I served on active duty in the U. S. Navy for four years (Electronics Technician), two years in the Texas Air Force National Guard (Security Police), 13 years in the Texas Army National Guard (Armor Crewman and Armor Officer), and six years in the Army Reserve (Staff Officer). In there somewhere I managed to have a total of 23 months where I wasn't in for one reason or another. I retired from the Army Reserve last July mainly thanks to a detached retina in my left eye that makes me inelible to be deployed, so there you have it. My reserve unit was activated in January and is at Fort Hood as we speak.... and I'm missing it, sigh.<BR><BR>So, that's all that's needed, no chest thumping, no bragging, just state your service and when it was and allow those who care to, to just say thank you for your service. <BR><BR>I certainly thank you, that's for sure.<BR><BR> icon_biggrin.gif<!--graemlin::D--> icon_biggrin.gif<!--graemlin::)--> icon_biggrin.gif<!--graemlin::blink:--><BR><BR><A HREF="http://www.texasgeocaching.com" TARGET=_blank><IMG SRC="http://www.texasgeocaching.com/images/texasgeocaching_sm.gif"> </A><BR>"Trade up, trade even, or don't trade!!!" My philosophy of life.

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Served as an Armor Officer, US Army, 1979-1999. Mrs Eagletrek served as a Signal Officer, US Army, 1981-2001. The Eagletrek's have 40 years combined service. Couldn't get enough of it. I'm currently serving as a Department of the Army civilian.

 

An interesting quote to ponder from Starship Troopers: "All right, let's sum up. This year in history, we talked about the failure of democracy. How the social scientists of the 21st Century brought our world to the brink of chaos. We talked about the veterans, how they took control and imposed the stability that has lasted for generations since. We talked about the rights and privileges between those who served in the armed forces and those who haven't, therefore called citizens and civilians." :laughing::laughing::laughing::o

Edited by eagletrek
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I guess I'll chime in.<BR><BR>1991-1995 Cryptologic Linguist, USAF<BR>Presidio Of Monterey, CA<BR>Goodfellow AFB, TX<BR>Osan AFB, South Korea<BR>Fort Meade, MD<BR><BR>Previous to that I was in Army JROTC at Fishburne Military School in Waynesboro, VA. Went to Virginia Tech for a short stint before realizing I wasn't quite ready. Finished up my degree while in the service.<BR><BR>frog.gif<!--graemlin::laughing:--> Jeremy Irish<BR>Groundspeak - The Language of Location

 

Hey, Goodbuddy and Ft. Meade!

 

I was an Air Force officer assigned to the National Security Agency during the Vietnam era so I am familiar with those two places.

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Wandered all over the the mts and Central Plains of Vietnam as a platoon leader , using a compass and map, measuring distance by tranferring pebbles from one pocket to the other (50 steps per pebble). Recently talked to a Scout from Desert Storm, who used GPS. THat's CHEATING!!!!!! Dave, 173rd Airborne

 

db173skysoldier@aol.com

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Thought I had answered this already, but apparently not

Army 1980-2004, (West) Germany, South Korea, Panama, Haiti, Bosnia, Kosovo, Iraq I and II (plus kuwait)

Mostly with Cavalry or heavy units - but some light fighting just to spice it up. After spending my last 2.5 years deployed away, I decided it was time to hang up the spurs and find something more stable to do. :)

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Wow! I just noticed this thread, and I've been reading it for the past 4 hours. I didn't realise there were so many vets into geocaching.

 

 

Amen to that!!!! I had no idea that when I started this thread it would have so many folks respond, nor that it would last as long as it has.

 

I also want to thank the Groundspeak folks for grandfathering this thread and letting it live for so long. Kudos to you as well.

 

Mac

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:laughing: I have posted to this thread already but seeing as it has lasted so long I am weighing in again.

6 years USAF; 4 years 1967-1971 Regular with 19 months in South East Asia, 2 years Inactive Reserve.

14 years CalARNG as an MP with duty in more foriegn police actions than I care to remember.

Currently working fulltime as a civilian and part time as a DOJ Detector Dog handler mostly with CBC and US Marshalls office.

Best wishes and luck to anyone currently in the "sand box." :unsure:

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Thought this was a good place to post this.

 

A Different Christmas Poem

 

The embers glowed softly, and in their dim light,

I gazed round the room and I cherished the sight.

My wife was asleep, her head on my chest,

My daughter beside me, angelic in rest.

Outside the snow fell, a blanket of white,

Transforming the yard to a winter delight.

The sparkling lights in the tree I believe,

Completed the magic that was Christmas Eve.

My eyelids were heavy, my breathing was deep,'

Secure and surrounded by love I would sleep.

In perfect contentment, or so it would seem,

So I slumbered, perhaps I started to dream.

 

The sound wasn't loud, and it wasn't too near,

But I opened my eyes when it tickled my ear.

Perhaps just a cough, I didn't quite know,

Then the sure sound of footsteps outside in the snow.

My soul gave a tremble, I struggled to hear,

And I crept to the door just to see who was near.

Standing out in the cold and the dark of the night,

A lone figure stood, his face weary and tight.

 

A soldier, I puzzled, some twenty years old,

Perhaps a Marine, huddled here in the cold.

Alone in the dark, he looked up and smiled,

Standing watch over me, and my wife and my child.

"What are you doing?" I asked without fear,

"Come in this moment, it's freezing out here!

Put down your pack, brush the snow from your sleeve,

You should be at home on a cold Christmas Eve!"

 

For barely a moment I saw his eyes shift,

Away from the cold and the snow blown in drifts..

To the window that danced with a warm fire's light

Then he sighed and he said "Its really all right,

I'm out here by choice. I'm here every night."

"It's my duty to stand at the front of the line,

That separates you from the darkest of times.

No one had to ask or beg or implore me,

I'm proud to stand here like my fathers before me.

My Gramps died at 'Pearl on a day in December,"

Then he sighed, "That's a Christmas 'Gram always remembers."

My dad stood his watch in the jungles of 'Nam',

And now it is my turn and so, here I am.

I've not seen my own son in more than a while,

But my wife sends me pictures, he's sure got her smile.

 

Then he bent and he carefully pulled from his bag,

The red, white, and blue... an American flag.

I can live through the cold and the being alone,

Away from my family, my house and my home.

I can stand at my post through the rain and the sleet,

I can sleep in a foxhole with little to eat.

I can carry the weight of killing another,

lay down my life with my sister and brother..

Who stand at the front against any and all,

To ensure for all time that this flag will not fall."

 

"So go back inside," he said, "harbor no fright,

Your family is waiting and I'll be all right."

"But isn't there something I can do, at the least,

"Give you money," I asked, "or prepare you a feast?

It seems all too little for all that you've done,

For being away from your wife and your son."

Then his eye welled a tear that held no regret,

"Just tell us you love us, and never forget.

To fight for our rights back at home while we're gone,

To stand your own watch, no matter how long.

For when we come home, either standing or dead,

To know you remember we fought and we bled.

Is payment enough, and with that we will trust,

That we mattered to you as you mattered to us."

 

LCDR Jeff Giles, SC, USN

Iraq

Edited by Luckless
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On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, we all lower our heads in silent thought of those who sacrificed so that we may live.

Currently in Canada there are only 3 remaining veterans of the 1st world war. The remaining veterans are Percy Wilson, 105, and Lloyd Clemett and John Babcock, both 106.

They and those before or after them will never be forgotten.

 

I really applaud those that have kept this thread alive

I have already posted previously but here I am again.

CDN Forces 22 years and still going

EOD/IEDD Instructor

AVN Technician

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I'll post for my hubby:

 

Canadian Army, 16 years

 

Air Defence, Artillery, Petawawa, ON (1990-1999)

RMS, Trenton AFB, ON (1999-2002)

NORAD, Peterson AFB, Colorado (2002-2006)

Greenwood AFB, NS (now)

 

me:

 

Canadian Army Reserve, 2 years

 

Air Defence, Artillery, Petawawa, ON (1994-1996)

currently applying to the military police, hope to be in reg. force (active duty) by next summer.

 

As Rememberance Day/Veterans Day comes let us remember all that have served and continue to serve.

 

Lest we Forget.

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I thought I'd answered this thread at some point (just like the "screen name is more than an alias" thread) but I guess not. I did 22 years, Army, all reserve. They were 17 in the Nat. Guard, 5 in the Army Reserve. All in communications. That's the U.S. Army Signal Corps insignia as my avatar, although I suppose I should get a better likeness of it one of these days.

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As long as this thread has been around, I can't believe that I didn't see it until now.

 

I joined in 1985 as a medic, was with the 4th Infantry Division from 1987-1990, and stayed in until 1993 as a nurse. I was never deployed, though I was in during the first Gulf War. I know hundreds of fellow soldiers who went over, and know well of the pride that they have in having served. We've got active and reserve troops in our local caching groups, and are proud to have them in our ranks, too.

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13+ years (and counting) with the USAF here.

 

I've been a F-15 Avionics Tech for years, but I transferred over to the F-22A a few years back.

 

I'm currently at Langley AFB in Virginia.. Been stationed in Colorado and the UK as well.

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I thought I'd answered this thread at some point (just like the "screen name is more than an alias" thread) but I guess not. I did 22 years, Army, all reserve. They were 17 in the Nat. Guard, 5 in the Army Reserve. All in communications. That's the U.S. Army Signal Corps insignia as my avatar, although I suppose I should get a better likeness of it one of these days.

 

US Army Signal Corps here as well.

 

I've served 9 years active and 4 in the Nat Guard. I was with the 121st, 122nd, and 123rd Division Signal Battalions as well as the 442nd trng Bn at Fort Gordon. I was also the Brigade S-6 for 2ID DISCOM, 1ID Telecom Officer and Brigade S-6 for 66th Avn Bde.

 

I have since moved on to a Functional Area assignment and am doing Information Operations. I've been deployed several times in this field and am currently transferring to the 29th ID as the IO Targeting Officer.

 

Here's a copy of the sigflag graphic I like to use.

 

Sig-Flags.gif

Edited by BRTango
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I thought I'd answered this thread at some point (just like the "screen name is more than an alias" thread) but I guess not. I did 22 years, Army, all reserve. They were 17 in the Nat. Guard, 5 in the Army Reserve. All in communications. That's the U.S. Army Signal Corps insignia as my avatar, although I suppose I should get a better likeness of it one of these days.

 

US Army Signal Corps here as well.

 

I've served 9 years active and 4 in the Nat Guard. I was with the 121st, 122nd, and 123rd Division Signal Battalions as well as the 442nd trng Bn at Fort Gordon. I was also the Brigade S-6 for 2ID DISCOM, 1ID Telecom Officer and Brigade S-6 for 66th Avn Bde.

 

I have since moved on to a Functional Area assignment and am doing Information Operations. I've been deployed several times in this field and am currently transferring to the 29th ID as the IO Targeting Officer.

 

Here's a copy of the sigflag graphic I like to use.

 

 

Outstanding BRTango. I'm borrowing that baby, thanks. That's one thing I regret, I never got to serve in any Signal units. I did most of my time with Combat Engineers, at both the BN and BDE level.

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Enlilsted in the Navy V5 program (naval aviation cadet) in March of 1943. Ended up as a junior deck officer on USS Poseidon ARL 12 in the Pacific Returned to home in Southern Illinois in July of 1946. Dick, W7WT

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Once again I'm just checking in on this thread to see the new posts, and reposts of some who've posted long ago.

 

It is inspiring to me to read about each of the experiences and stories of each individual veteran. It seems no two have the exact same thing to report, and each expresses their term of service in a different way.

 

Keep them coming folks. I love the fact that our kindred spirits in other countries than just the U. S. chime in as well. As has been stated before, ALL military related service in any country is welcome to be posted. Another kudo to all who have posted without it turning into some kind of political issue.

 

No politics here, just the culture of service to something that is bigger than ourselves.

 

As I tell my buds still serving in harms way: "Keep your head down, use cover, and wear the full 'Battle Rattle' at all times."

 

Those that know will understand.

 

Mac

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First time in a long while I've been in these forums. Hadn't noticed this topic. I'm glad it's here.

 

Well, 26 plus years, mostly Naval Reserve. Did four years active duty right out of high school, then 20 years or so in the Reserves. I got recalled after 9/11 and served 13 months active duty before I finally retired in 2003.

 

I was an fancy electrician for the first 12 years, then I transferred into Intelligence. Boy, was being a spy FUN! Anyway, I miss the paid travel, the camaraderie, the institutional food, the 100 hour work weeks. Oh yeah, did I mention the food? Seriously, if it weren't for the fact I retired, I'd be with my friend in Afghanistan.

 

To all here who have served, thank you. If you are still serving, I say, "Stay safe!"

 

-- Joe Spy (USNR-Ret)

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My name is Johnny and below are my stats. I was introduced through survey. I helped to setup an artillary battery and we used those rotating survey heads and would enter the location data into a computer that gave us gun settings, deflection and azimuth. During Desert Storm someone in a Humvee would show up with a box about the size as a child-size shoebox and give me some numbers to write down.

 

USMC 1989-1995

0844

F Battery, 2/14

11 Marines, Desert Storm Veteran

Edited by pdt203
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US Navy Hospital Corpsman for 5 years, from 2001-2006. Deployed to the Gulf for Enduring Freedom, which turned into Iraqui Freedom. I was honorably discharged in February after completing my enlistment. I don't think this makes me better than anyone else but it has me, personally, a better person. I experienced things, good and bad, that I wouldn't have otherwise and has shaped who I am today and how I live my life. Would I do it again? Don't know but I certainly don't wish I could take it back.

 

June

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Thought this was a good place to post this.

 

A Different Christmas Poem

 

The embers glowed softly, and in their dim light,

I gazed round the room and I cherished the sight.

My wife was asleep, her head on my chest,

My daughter beside me, angelic in rest.

Outside the snow fell, a blanket of white,

Transforming the yard to a winter delight.

The sparkling lights in the tree I believe,

Completed the magic that was Christmas Eve.

My eyelids were heavy, my breathing was deep,'

Secure and surrounded by love I would sleep.

In perfect contentment, or so it would seem,

So I slumbered, perhaps I started to dream.

 

The sound wasn't loud, and it wasn't too near,

But I opened my eyes when it tickled my ear.

Perhaps just a cough, I didn't quite know,

Then the sure sound of footsteps outside in the snow.

My soul gave a tremble, I struggled to hear,

And I crept to the door just to see who was near.

Standing out in the cold and the dark of the night,

A lone figure stood, his face weary and tight.

 

A soldier, I puzzled, some twenty years old,

Perhaps a Marine, huddled here in the cold.

Alone in the dark, he looked up and smiled,

Standing watch over me, and my wife and my child.

"What are you doing?" I asked without fear,

"Come in this moment, it's freezing out here!

Put down your pack, brush the snow from your sleeve,

You should be at home on a cold Christmas Eve!"

 

For barely a moment I saw his eyes shift,

Away from the cold and the snow blown in drifts..

To the window that danced with a warm fire's light

Then he sighed and he said "Its really all right,

I'm out here by choice. I'm here every night."

"It's my duty to stand at the front of the line,

That separates you from the darkest of times.

No one had to ask or beg or implore me,

I'm proud to stand here like my fathers before me.

My Gramps died at 'Pearl on a day in December,"

Then he sighed, "That's a Christmas 'Gram always remembers."

My dad stood his watch in the jungles of 'Nam',

And now it is my turn and so, here I am.

I've not seen my own son in more than a while,

But my wife sends me pictures, he's sure got her smile.

 

Then he bent and he carefully pulled from his bag,

The red, white, and blue... an American flag.

I can live through the cold and the being alone,

Away from my family, my house and my home.

I can stand at my post through the rain and the sleet,

I can sleep in a foxhole with little to eat.

I can carry the weight of killing another,

lay down my life with my sister and brother..

Who stand at the front against any and all,

To ensure for all time that this flag will not fall."

 

"So go back inside," he said, "harbor no fright,

Your family is waiting and I'll be all right."

"But isn't there something I can do, at the least,

"Give you money," I asked, "or prepare you a feast?

It seems all too little for all that you've done,

For being away from your wife and your son."

Then his eye welled a tear that held no regret,

"Just tell us you love us, and never forget.

To fight for our rights back at home while we're gone,

To stand your own watch, no matter how long.

For when we come home, either standing or dead,

To know you remember we fought and we bled.

Is payment enough, and with that we will trust,

That we mattered to you as you mattered to us."

 

LCDR Jeff Giles, SC, USN

Iraq

 

Well, I am bawling like a baby here. That is a beautiful poem.

 

June

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US Army (Hoohah)

1990-1992 MOS unimportant, clearance unimportant, V Corps-Frankfurt Germany- HHC 22nd Signal

 

To all the veterans who have served, to the military who are serving & to those who gave the ultimate in service.. you are greatly thanked so that we may have the freedoms that we enjoy today. Especially the freedom of speech :huh:

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11th Armored Calvary Regiment in Bad Hersfeld, Germany 1974-78. We were the "Workhorse" regiment. Spent my time on tank ranges and at OP's watching the East Germans/Russians. The regiment is now the aggressor force for war games and the old Kaserne has been returned to the Germans. A big thankyou to all those currently in uniform. Peoria Bill :>)

Edited by Peoria Bill
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1980-82 us army Schweinfurt germany 3 ID groundsurvalence rader

82- 83 us army Fort Hood TX 1 ACR

83-85 315 AW usaf reserve Aircraft mechanic

85-2004 USAF Flight engineer C-5 Galaxy 1 gulf war ,bosnia, kosovo, desert storm ,Iraq, operation northeren watch. half a dozen more I can't remember

2004-present Goverment contractor providing mission planning expertise

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USAF E-6, 1988-Present

 

820th RED HORSE, Nellis AFB, NV. - 88-92

Cross trainee, Kessler AFB, MS. 92-93

B52G+H COMM/NAV, 99th CAMS, Ellsworth AFB, SD. - 93-95

MH53-J PAVELOW COMM/NAV, 352nd SOG, RAF Mildenhall, UK - 95-98

TALCE COMM/AGE, McGuire AFB, NJ. - 98-01

Instructor TALCE COMM, Fort Dix, NJ. - 01-03

Ground Combat Skills Instructor, Fort Dix, NJ. - 03-06

FE Warren AFB, WY. 06 - Present

 

Some TDY locations:

Italy, Sweden, Norway, Scotland, England, Germany, Albania, Croatia, Bosnia, Kuwait, Egypt, Morocco, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Columbia, Honduras, Porto Rico, and a crap load of state side locations.

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In the UK there is a great deal of ambivalence towards the armed forces, except in times of a war that either affects everyone (ie WW1 and WW2) or is generally popular around the country (ie the Falklands). For the rest of the time most people could not care less, or worse. It was ever thus, as anyone who has ever read Rudyard Kipling's poetry (yes, he is the bloke that wrote "The Jungle Book", but without the singing cartoon animals, obviously). In particular his poem "Tommy" (British soldiers are referred to as "Toms", "Tommy" or "Tommy Atkins") raises this very point, which has been borne out recently when uniformed Royal Marines were denied entry to a bar after the military funeral of one of their mates killed in Iraq. It was written in 1892, oh how little has changed. I therefore commend to you:

 

TOMMY

 

I WENT into a public-'ouse to get a pint o' beer,

The publican 'e up an' sez, "We serve no red-coats here."

The girls be'ind the bar they laughed an' giggled fit to die,

I outs into the street again an' to myself sez I:

O it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, go away";

But it’s "Thank you, Mister Atkins", when the band begins to play,—

The band begins to play, my boys, the band begins to play,

O it's "Thank you, Mister Atkins", when the band begins to play.

 

I went into a theatre as sober as could be,

They gave a drunk civilian room, but 'adn't none for me;

They sent me to the gallery or round the music-'alls,

But when it comes to fightin', Lord! they'll shove me in the stalls!

For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, wait outside";

But it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide,—

The troopship's on the tide, my boys, the troopship's on the tide,

O it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide.

 

Yes, makin' mock o' uniforms that guard you while you sleep

Is cheaper than them uniforms, an' they're starvation cheap;

An' hustlin' drunken soldiers when they're goin' large a bit

Is five times better business than paradin' in full kit.

Then it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, 'ow's yer soul?"

But it's "Thin red line of 'eroes" when the drums begin to roll,—

The drums begin to roll, my boys, the drums begin to roll,

O it's "Thin red line of 'eroes" when the drums begin to roll.

 

We aren't no thin red 'eroes, nor we aren't no blackguards too,

But single men in barricks, most remarkable like you;

An' if sometimes our conduck isn't all your fancy paints,

Why, single men in barricks don't grow into plaster saints;

While it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, fall be'ind",

But it's "Please to walk in front, sir", when there's trouble in the wind,—

There's trouble in the wind, my boys, there's trouble in the wind,

O it's "Please to walk in front, sir", when there’s trouble in the wind.

 

You talk o' better food for us, an' schools, an' fires, an' all:

We'll wait for extry rations if you treat us rational.

Don't mess about the cook-room slops, but prove it to our face

The Widow's Uniform is not the soldier-man's disgrace.

For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Chuck him out, the brute!"

But it's "Saviour of 'is country" when the guns begin to shoot;

An' it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' anything you please;

An' Tommy ain't a bloomin' fool—you bet that Tommy sees!

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Army Guard and Reserve.

11B Infantryman and Medic.

 

While the military is a young person's game - the maximum age has been raised:

 

H.R.1815 SEC. 543. INCREASE MAXIMUM AGE FOR ENLISTMENT.

Section 505(a) of title 10, United States Code, is amended by striking `thirty-five years of age' and inserting `forty-two years of age'.

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22 years total between active duty Army and National Guard. I have served in KY, TN, TX, CA, GA, MS and HI as well as Kuwait and Iraq. As for jobs...Military Police, Chemical Equipment Repair, Metal Work and Unit Mail Clerk. I have served as Squad Leader and Platoon Sergeant as well as NBC NCO. A lot of years and experience reduced to a brief paragraph...and I'm proud of every bit of my service. Thanks for asking. <_<

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USN 1995-1999

MR3 (Machinist)

Aboard the USS George Washington CVN-73 (Nuclear aircraft carrier)

 

Wow, now that is really something. As I've stated here before, I was at the Christening of the Washington at Newport News shipyards in 1990. I've always had an interest in her since then. How is she holding up after all these years???

 

Mac

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In the UK there is a great deal of ambivalence towards the armed forces, except in times of a war that either affects everyone (ie WW1 and WW2) or is generally popular around the country (ie the Falklands). For the rest of the time most people could not care less, or worse. It was ever thus, as anyone who has ever read Rudyard Kipling's poetry (yes, he is the bloke that wrote "The Jungle Book", but without the singing cartoon animals, obviously). In particular his poem "Tommy" (British soldiers are referred to as "Toms", "Tommy" or "Tommy Atkins") raises this very point, which has been borne out recently when uniformed Royal Marines were denied entry to a bar after the military funeral of one of their mates killed in Iraq. It was written in 1892, oh how little has changed. I therefore commend to you:

 

TOMMY

 

An' Tommy ain't a bloomin' fool—you bet that Tommy sees!

 

That is one of the best poets of anything military EVER. Kipling wrote for the soldier, that's for sure.

 

I've tried to memorize Gunga Din a few times, but never with a lot of success. Another great one for sure. Between that and trying to memorize Alfred Lord Tennysons "Charge of the Light Brigade" I've simply shown my complete and utter failure at such things...lol.

 

Mac

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I spent 5 years on Active Duty Army, from 92-97. I've been to Korea and Ft. Hood, TX. I spent most of that in the infantry then changed over to aviation as a Blackhawk mechanic. I went straight into the Alabama Army National Guard in 97 where I have been ever since. I'm currently serving in Iraq as a Blackhawk Crewchief so I get to see pretty much the whole country, and yes my GPS goes with me everywhere I fly. You never know where a cache might be ! I see a lot of cachers working in the area but have yet to meet up on a hunt. Hope to see you on the trail.

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I had the fortune to be in the US NAVY for 8 year 1961-1969 as an Electronics Tech on submarines (ET-1 SS).

 

During the last 4 years of that I was very much involved with what we called the TRANSIT system. This was the first operational Global Positioning System. We would track 1 satellite every 3 or 4 days. At the time it was very highly classified. The units we used were contained in two 5 foot high cabinets. The primary use of the system was for Research and Development. We would compare the data we received with our inertial navigation system and the data was always within our "shooting" specs. What a long way we have come in size and cost.

 

USS Scorpion SSN-589 - - - Norfolk, Va

USS US Grant SSBN-631 - - Hawaii/Guam

USS Kamehameha SSNB-642 - - Hawaii/Guam

:ph34r:

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Served US Army 1983 - 1998

Was on DRB with the 101st when Desert Storm/Shield went down so I was with the first group on the ground. Was there for 9 1/2 months.

Was a 68D (Aircraft Powertrain Mechanic) and was with the 4/101 during the above time.

Spent 5 years in Germany. 84 - 87 in Stuttgart and 92 - 94 in Hanau.

Got an honorable discharge in 98 thanks to Clinton's cutbacks and ended up with 60% disablilty.

 

My second oldest son is now in the US Army also. He is MI and has already been to Baghdad and may be returning again this summer.

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