Jump to content

How did you serve?


Breaktrack
Followers 28

Recommended Posts

:) Well gosh.

I only put in the active service: USAF Air Rescue 1967-1971 with several 90 day TDYs to Southeast Asia ( not just Vietnam ) so I thought I might as well add 14 years in the CalARNG as a 95 Bravo Combat MP type with a few more missions that I am not supposed to relate.

I am eagerly awaiting sarcasm and hostility from the microencephalics and psychoceramics. E7 Mac signing off.

Link to comment

Canadian armed forces.

 

Joined the reserves in 1995 at 16 as an infantryman.

Transfered to the "real" army in 1998 as a combat engineer

 

Served in Indonesia (East-Timor) in 1999/2000 as a section member.

Served in Afghanistan (Kabul) in 2004 as a Explosives and Ordinance Disposal technician.

 

Hope to serve for many more years.

 

God bless All troops.

 

Evil Homer

Edited by Evil Homer
Link to comment
Forest Ranger for NPS. That ought to count for something. Fought valiantly in the Tourist Wars, keeping them out of sensitive areas.

Wow, would I like to talk to you!!! LOL.

 

I'm wanting to do something like that once I retire from the Sheriff's Department here in Houston. Got my eye on working or volunteering to work up in Yellowstone for a few summers.

 

Mac

Link to comment
Proud wife of a retired US Army SFC, MOS 19K. Our last duty station before he retired in 2001 was Bad Kreuznach Germany. We were there when they closed down the post and watched the 1st Armored Division's final march through the city. Other stations included Ft. Hood, Schweinfurt Germany, Kitzingen, Germany, Ft. Leavenworth, KS. The most unusual thing he did while in the Army was to go to Waco on 'Jesus Watch'. His unit provided the M1 tanks used during the David Koresh stand-off then each platoon rotated on a weekly basis to Waco in case the ATF folks needed help.

 

I worked as a civilian for the 410th BSB, in Bad Kreuznach; the 66th MI Group in Darmstadt, Germany; and the US Army Corps of Engineers in Washington, DC before I went to work for Northrop Grumman.

 

My daughter served in the Army reserve, my son-in-law served in the Army, they are now both contractors working in Germany.

 

My younger daughter tried to join the Army and Air Force but due to a missing finger on her left hand they wouldn't take her, their loss as she would have made a great general!

 

Currently my twin sons are still in high school, but one aspires to go to West Point and the other wants to go to the Naval Academy.

Holy Cow!! My dad was stationed in Bad Kreuznach back in 1968-70 and we lived in base housing that whole time. I was in the 5th, 6th, and 7th grades through that time. Loved it over there. Was a member of troop 98 of the Boy Scouts.

 

I have FOND memories of BK!!! I was so sorry to hear of the base closing, like losing part of your home town to an army brat.

 

Mac

Link to comment
snip

knowing someone served, in whatever capacity, in our nation's forces gives them a little more credibiity with me when it comes to what they say.

snip

I think perhaps it's the broad brush that bothered some people. For example, at 16 I did many hours volunteer work in a very busy major metropolitan hospital. I watched a number of people die as the doctors and nurses strove to save them. Even a teenage girl had her life slip away as I was worked an ambu bag so she could breathe. It was hard when the Dr. told me there was no reason to continue.

Later I was a volunteer Firefighter/EMT. I did things like watch people die, coughing up blood and choaking as we tried to extricate them from mangle wrecks, or covering the body of a decapitated trucker.

 

Now, when you speak of giving more credibilty to someone who served in the armed forces when they speak of military matters, that's one thing, but to give a military radar operator more credibilty than me, on the subject of dealing with extreme trauma, or what it's like to watch people die, that I would take exception to. However, I'll give you the benifit of the doubt and assume you didn't mean to paint such a broad stroke.

 

I do thank and appreciate all those who put their lives on the line, and those behind the scenes that work to keep them alive when they do. Whenever I go to Arlington National Cemetary to visit my dad, I always take the time to think of all the others as well.

Link to comment
Holy Cow!! My dad was stationed in Bad Kreuznach back in 1968-70 and we lived in base housing that whole time. I was in the 5th, 6th, and 7th grades through that time. Loved it over there. Was a member of troop 98 of the Boy Scouts.

 

I have FOND memories of BK!!! I was so sorry to hear of the base closing, like losing part of your home town to an army brat.

 

Mac

My husband was the last Scout Master for troop 98 in BK. We have or had (I haven't seen it since our last move) an old black & white photo of Boy Scouts raising the American flag on post dated from the 1970's. My husband said he didn't want to see the picture get tossed out since it was a part of history. We also have some of the old troop flags.

 

My second daughter was in the last graduating class of Bad Kreuznach American High School "The best little school in Germany".

 

I really miss BK too, and still have a German friend I correspond with. She has lived in BK for 30 years and has only ever worked for the Americans and now has to commute to Wiesbaden. You should check out this web site:

http://www.stadt-bad-kreuznach.de/ There is a guest book you can sign.

Link to comment

Active duty from 1959 - 1984, US Army. retired MSGT, was at fort dix, fort knox, DMZ Korea, Fort George G. Meade, Md, pentagon, US Army Military Personnel Center, Alexandria, va, Fort AP hill, Va, Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii. I must say i never regetted a moment of it.

Link to comment

I can't remember if I've done this or not, but if it's a repeat who's to care?

 

I'm a Brit, not a Yank - sorry guys.

 

19 years service (on top of two years in an MOD (DoD to you guys) college). Started out in supply, specialised in IEDD. Two tours in NI, and the Falklands on the QE2 in '82.

 

For Brits - I was an ATO, commanded 221 (EOD) Coy RAOC, latterly 921 (EOD) Sqn RLC.

 

Maybe I should change my Nick to Felix.

 

Now how on earth do I post a pic here?

Link to comment

I was in the US Navy for just over 20 yrs. USS Independence, USS Antietam, USS Kitty Hawk. Grenada, Libya, Beruit (3 tours), Persian Gulf war, Somalia... Had a LOT of good times too. I retired in 2000 as IC1. Funny all those years working with satillite navigation and never once thought about Geocaching. Retire and look what I do now for a hobby!

Link to comment

Uninted States Marine Corps 67-69

 

"A Company called Mike" 3rd Battalion, 7th Marines, 3rd Marine Division

 

2531, Field radio opereator

 

Viet Nam 13 months 23 days

 

WIA January 1st 1969... enemy grenade

 

Stationed all around Da Nang

 

HILL 52

 

HILL 55

 

HILL 10

 

DODGE CITY

 

Grandfather, Army WWI

Father, Army WWII

Two brothers, two nephews were in the Corps,

Sisters son currently on active duty at Pendleton, he was also in Afganastan.

Son in Law on active duty Army Guard.

Great nephew (Army) currently ready to deploy.

 

I always remove my cap & stand at attention wherever "Old Glory" is being presented.

 

God Bless all veterans, Past, Present & Future

 

Semper Fi

Edited by onetrapper
Link to comment
snip

knowing someone served, in whatever capacity, in our nation's forces gives them a little more credibiity with me when it comes to what they say.

snip

I think perhaps it's the broad brush that bothered some people. For example, at 16 I did many hours volunteer work in a very busy major metropolitan hospital. I watched a number of people die as the doctors and nurses strove to save them. Even a teenage girl had her life slip away as I was worked an ambu bag so she could breathe. It was hard when the Dr. told me there was no reason to continue.

Later I was a volunteer Firefighter/EMT. I did things like watch people die, coughing up blood and choaking as we tried to extricate them from mangle wrecks, or covering the body of a decapitated trucker.

 

Now, when you speak of giving more credibilty to someone who served in the armed forces when they speak of military matters, that's one thing, but to give a military radar operator more credibilty than me, on the subject of dealing with extreme trauma, or what it's like to watch people die, that I would take exception to. However, I'll give you the benifit of the doubt and assume you didn't mean to paint such a broad stroke.

Wow, didn't mean to upset anyone with my post to start all this, just expressing my personal opinion based on my experience with an over all group of individuals who volunteered to be far from home, in extreme environments, under dangerous circumstances, without knowing if they'd ever see home and loved ones again, yet hung in there and accomplished the missions assigned, over and over and over again, with little hope of thanks or reward, knowing that their death or maiming at the hands of an enemy, or even a training accident, might make the late night news for about 10 seconds and fade into obscurity.

 

I don't remember saying anything about any other form of serving being a "bad" thing. This was specifically aimed at a particular group, and having never been an EMT or rescue tech, or whatever you were, I could not speak on behalf of that group. Being around, or in the military, in several different branches, literally since my birth in a Navy hospital, I felt I had maybe just a small leg up on knowing something about the lifestyle, and the people who populate it. I've only been a police officer for the past 25 years, since I got off active duty in the Navy, so I wouldn't have ANY idea of what you are talking about, right??? LOL, LOL.

 

My apologies if my leaving out other forms of service offended you.

 

My apologies if I didn't specifically say that I would not take a military radar technicians advice over my plumbers advice if my pipes needed fixing....sheesh. But if one of my brothers/sisters in arms says they are going to do something, I can take that to the bank much more readily than I can the average run of the mill jackanape off the street. I think that was pretty clear and was not a "broad brush" of any kind.

 

Well, I went on and on for a while and then just went back and deleted most of what I'd written. No offense was intended, but if someone is looking for a reason to take offense, there is no possible way to prevent it. So I'm going to quit trying to explain.

 

To Everyone: Please continue to list your service, however you may have served, either military or civilian, as the fact you are serving selflessly is much more important than how you served.

 

Mac

Link to comment
snip

knowing someone served, in whatever capacity, in our nation's forces gives them a little more credibiity with me when it comes to what they say.

snip

I think perhaps it's the broad brush that bothered some people. For example, at 16 I did many hours volunteer work in a very busy major metropolitan hospital. I watched a number of people die as the doctors and nurses strove to save them. Even a teenage girl had her life slip away as I was worked an ambu bag so she could breathe. It was hard when the Dr. told me there was no reason to continue.

Later I was a volunteer Firefighter/EMT. I did things like watch people die, coughing up blood and choaking as we tried to extricate them from mangle wrecks, or covering the body of a decapitated trucker.

 

Now, when you speak of giving more credibilty to someone who served in the armed forces when they speak of military matters, that's one thing, but to give a military radar operator more credibilty than me, on the subject of dealing with extreme trauma, or what it's like to watch people die, that I would take exception to. However, I'll give you the benifit of the doubt and assume you didn't mean to paint such a broad stroke.

Wow, didn't mean to upset anyone with my post to start all this, just expressing my personal opinion based on my experience with an over all group of individuals who volunteered to be far from home, in extreme environments, under dangerous circumstances, without knowing if they'd ever see home and loved ones again, yet hung in there and accomplished the missions assigned, over and over and over again, with little hope of thanks or reward, knowing that their death or maiming at the hands of an enemy, or even a training accident, might make the late night news for about 10 seconds and fade into obscurity.

 

I don't remember saying anything about any other form of serving being a "bad" thing. This was specifically aimed at a particular group, and having never been an EMT or rescue tech, or whatever you were, I could not speak on behalf of that group. Being around, or in the military, in several different branches, literally since my birth in a Navy hospital, I felt I had maybe just a small leg up on knowing something about the lifestyle, and the people who populate it. I've only been a police officer for the past 25 years, since I got off active duty in the Navy, so I wouldn't have ANY idea of what you are talking about, right??? LOL, LOL.

 

My apologies if my leaving out other forms of service offended you.

 

My apologies if I didn't specifically say that I would not take a military radar technicians advice over my plumbers advice if my pipes needed fixing....sheesh. But if one of my brothers/sisters in arms says they are going to do something, I can take that to the bank much more readily than I can the average run of the mill jackanape off the street. I think that was pretty clear and was not a "broad brush" of any kind.

 

Well, I went on and on for a while and then just went back and deleted most of what I'd written. No offense was intended, but if someone is looking for a reason to take offense, there is no possible way to prevent it. So I'm going to quit trying to explain.

 

To Everyone: Please continue to list your service, however you may have served, either military or civilian, as the fact you are serving selflessly is much more important than how you served.

 

Mac

Mac! Buddy... Don't sweat the small stuff. Anyone that knows you knows that your respect comes on an individual basis. Even though I never "served" I fully understood your "Brotherhood of Service" meaning and never felt left out or disrespected by you.

 

You and I both know that some folks just WANT to have something to get good and mad about. I love it when someone shows their as$ over something so trivial. Treat it as entertainment and laugh it off. :blink:

Link to comment

;) What Snoogans said and don't sweat the small stuff.

Anyone who has actually seen the hind end of the world from the military knows we serve to keep the freedom to say almost any thing we want without governmental bias keeping that in check.

Unfortunately that means the idiots also get their say. :blink:

Link to comment

18 years, Army crewchief. Just got into geocaching after I saw it on Law&Order. I am always surprised by how many caches there are. I've mentioned it to a couple friends and typically get blank looks as if to say " You run around in the woods on the weekends on purpose?!"

 

I love this because it feeds my technogeek and outdoors needs. Getting ready to place my second cache this weekend. It is going to be a multi and at least a 3.5 difficulty. :D

Link to comment

I know this is for ex-military but I wanted to post anyway. My wifa and I are both in the US Army as Helicopter pilots. We living in Germany right now and loving it, the weather kind of stinks this time of year but beautiful country and people. The caches are everywhere, there are 1800 within 100 miles of my house! We just started back in May of this year and get out when we can. :D

 

To all my borhters-in-arms remember that we are all professionals but the world is full of amatuers. Come home safe!

Edited by Tew-rific
Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 28
×
×
  • Create New...