Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Guest bubba232

This sounds silly but...

Recommended Posts

Guest bubba232

the area's but it would be nice not to spend a couple of hours driving back and forth on a BUSY two lane road looking for a starting spot. Just mention "Use East/West park entrance" or name a parking lot.

 

Am I totally off on this point? Sorry for the length.

Share this post


Link to post
Guest jeremy

Many folks do this (including myself). Many are purists and just want the coordinates, but in my experience it's better to give a starting point to reduce "bushwhacking" - You never quite know how others will locate your cache.

 

I use Mapblast directions to get close to the cache, and sometimes it points to a residential area as a starting point, because between two homes you can get there quicker - of course you can't since it is private property.

 

Jeremy

Share this post


Link to post
Guest Moun10Bike

Just a quick note -- you don't need to buy a topo map for each cache. Simply convert the coordinates of the cache to NAD27 (there is a link on each cache page that will do this automatically) and plug those coordinates into www.topozone.com. You will then see the cache location marked with a red cross on an online topo map of the area.

Share this post


Link to post
Guest peter

The cache pages include a link to topozone to do this for you automatically. However, it frequently doesn't solve the original problem since many of the USGS quads used by topozone are very out-of-date on the manmade features like roads and trails. They frequently don't show the current access point to public land.

Guess I'll edit my cache description to include suggested access pts.

Share this post


Link to post
Guest bubba232

quote:
Originally posted by Moun10Bike:

Just a quick note -- you don't need to buy a topo map for each cache. Simply convert the coordinates of the cache to NAD27 (there is a link on each cache page that will do this automatically) and plug those coordinates into www.topozone.com. You will then see the cache location marked with a red cross on an online topo map of the area.


 

I've used topozone to see the general terrain, you can't use it out in the field very well. I also don't have a printer. icon_frown.gif Besides how would you be able to scout new locations for a cache?

I do have Garmins' TOPO software. A lot of help that crap is!

Share this post


Link to post
Guest bubba232

quote:
Originally posted by Moun10Bike:

Just a quick note -- you don't need to buy a topo map for each cache. Simply convert the coordinates of the cache to NAD27 (there is a link on each cache page that will do this automatically) and plug those coordinates into www.topozone.com. You will then see the cache location marked with a red cross on an online topo map of the area.


 

I've used topozone to see the general terrain, you can't use it out in the field very well. I also don't have a printer. icon_frown.gif Besides how would you be able to scout new locations for a cache?

I do have Garmins' TOPO software. A lot of help that crap is!

Share this post


Link to post
Guest daviskw

I know this may seem a little techie but when you enter coordinates on the Topozone webpage, your minutes such as 33.041 are rounded to minutes seconds 33' 03". This rounding error can be as much as 70 feet or more. Now this only makes a difference if the cache is in dense cover and you must use the Topozone map and compass because you can not get a good reading on the GPS. I often just enter coordinates in my cheap Delorme Street Atlas software. It shows most of the park boundaries and accurately plots locations and I can download routes to my etrax.

Butch

Share this post


Link to post
Guest daviskw

I was just thinking and boy does it hurt! Maybe jeremy could insert a field in the online "hide a cache form" for a parking area description and or starting location.

 

Butch

Share this post


Link to post
Guest Moun10Bike

quote:
Originally posted by bubba232:

I've used topozone to see the general terrain, you can't use it out in the field very well. I also don't have a printer. icon_frown.gif Besides how would you be able to scout new locations for a cache?


 

OK, I didn't realize you wanted to strictly use the maps in the field. I tend to scout out a location on the map ahead of time to get a general idea of how I want to attack it, then use just the GPS once I'm there.

 

As for scouting out new locations, I find the online maps easier than paper maps for the reasons you mentioned in your initial post -- you don't need to have a bunch of topos on hand to do it. You can look at any you want online. Again, this assumes that you are not taking the maps out into the field with you. The issue in that case is not specifically geocaching related, but one of wanting a map of the area when out in the woods.

Share this post


Link to post
Guest Moun10Bike

quote:
Originally posted by bubba232:

I've used topozone to see the general terrain, you can't use it out in the field very well. I also don't have a printer. icon_frown.gif Besides how would you be able to scout new locations for a cache?


 

OK, I didn't realize you wanted to strictly use the maps in the field. I tend to scout out a location on the map ahead of time to get a general idea of how I want to attack it, then use just the GPS once I'm there.

 

As for scouting out new locations, I find the online maps easier than paper maps for the reasons you mentioned in your initial post -- you don't need to have a bunch of topos on hand to do it. You can look at any you want online. Again, this assumes that you are not taking the maps out into the field with you. The issue in that case is not specifically geocaching related, but one of wanting a map of the area when out in the woods.

Share this post


Link to post
Guest WrongWay

I think directions to a "trail head" are a bonus when traveling through populated areas. With the way urban sprawl is encroaching on the parks and mountain preserves around Phoenix metro you need good directions to get to a starting point.

 

The inverse also has merit. Posting coordinate data only will force the hunter to do some homework including actually looking at a map. Could make it more interesting.

 

Check out GC143. Without the hints, if the hunter approaches from the wrong direction he might be in for a swim...and quite possibly hypothermia...

Share this post


Link to post
Guest Krepism

If you look at the "Hounds Tooth" cache in UT (way point GC2af) He lists the coordinates of the parking lot, another for the trailhead, and then the cache coordinates. I think this is the best way to do it when there is a possibility that you might run across private property or have difficulty finding an approach.

Share this post


Link to post
Guest edmcnierney

quote:
Originally posted by daviskw:

I know this may seem a little techie but when you enter coordinates on the Topozone webpage, your minutes such as 33.041 are rounded to minutes seconds 33' 03". This rounding error can be as much as 70 feet or more.


 

Actually, we don't do that at all. We have data entry pages for decimal degrees and degrees/minutes/seconds, and neither is rounded. If you're seeing a position error it's most likely because you need to specify TopoZone coordinates as NAD27 rather than WGS84.

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

×
×
  • Create New...