Jump to content

&^%$*@ cheap rubbermaid containers.


CCrew
Followers 0

Recommended Posts

Did 4 caches today, two of which were in the cheapo "Sterilite" rubbermaid knock-offs. I HATE a soggy mass of mildew! No fitting, sorry cheap containers.

 

Ok, I ranted. Now I feel better. All I can say is that you'll NEVER see a regular cache hidden by me that's not in an ammo can.

 

Sometimes a majority only means that all the fools are on the same side

Link to comment

I agree that ammo boxes are the best container (and one of the cheapest). However real Rubbermaid, the type with the blue rim, holds up fairly well.

 

The real culprits are dollar store plastic containers, Gladware and deli/Chinese food containers. They tend to fail very quickly.

 

"It has been my experience that folks who have no vices have very few virtues" - Abraham Lincoln

Link to comment

Hey an interesting cache I found last week was made of PVC pipe with a screw on pipe fitting. It was hardly covered but it was dry and warm inside. I was kindof scared to put my hand inside because it was about 17 inches deep.

Anyway it was a fun way to store a cache

Shnarf

 

Save the whales, but make them behave.

Link to comment

quote:
Originally posted by NiteHeidi:

Coffee cans...


I have a coffee can in my closet right now that was used as a cache container. It is rusted inside and out, and when I finally rescued the cache and replaced the container with an ammo box, the contents of the coffee can were ruined. The logbook was hardly legible because the paper was so rust-stained. Unless you're using some other kind of can, I don't think they're a good idea.

 

Jamie

Link to comment

I use the 'Sterilite" containers for all my caches and they do quite well. The trick is to prepare them correctly. First they are spray painted camo and next I install a rubber weatherstrip seal around the lip. This makes them quite watertight as I have yet to have one fail through snow storms and HEAVY rains. You just have to spend a little extra time on preping the containers...the best part is they cost me $.89 ea at Wal-Mart!!

Link to comment

quote:
the best part is they cost me $.89 ea at Wal-Mart!!

 

And for $4 or so more you could have an ammo can that needs no paint, none of your time, and would seal too! :-)

 

After .89 for the container, a buck for paint, and your time, that's about a wash to me.

 

Not busting on you, but when you look at it from that way, you have to admit it makes sense.

 

Sometimes a majority only means that all the fools are on the same side

Link to comment

The threads leak unless tightend to the point that you can't open it by hand. If PVC is used, the open end should be placed down. Even then, it is a rigid material and ''breaths'' around the threads with the weather pressure changes. This action will result in condensation forming. While I've used the blue rimmed Rubbermaid containers with good results, I have also seen them gnawed on by animals and opened.

 

For Micro containers, I like prescription pill bottles as they seem to be water tight enough and have a child/animal proof cap. I have some large bottles that I can fit a conventional notebook in and pen along with some nice trading items like pocket screwdrivers, keychain tape measures and even travel bugs will fit.

 

But for a regular cache, I agree the ammo box with an intact gasket is hard to beat. Just be sure to put geocaching identification on the outside, over the yellow letters. It lets people know it is not a threatening device.

 

Steve Bukosky N9BGH

Waukesha Wisconsin

Link to comment

Ixnay onay ethay offeecay anscay...

 

We have a very dry climate in South-Eastern Washington (9 in rain per year and avg. humidity around 29% Rel Hum.) and coffee cans still get damp, rust and let lots of our mobile real estate in, and the lids tend to split in cold weather.

 

Real "Tupperware" (very expensive, unless Sugar isn't around when I take it) and high end Rubbermaid work well out here. However, all of my caches are good 'ol surplus ammo boxes.

 

I found one of the PVC pipe caches today and was really impressed. It was at a vineyard so I guess they get irragation supplies relatively cheap (they probably buy it a ton at a time). I don't think it is cost-effective in general (for me) but if I needed a container that was longer than usual I would use it in a heartbeat.

 

I can just see it now, "Sluggo's Walking Stick Only Cache", Take a walking stick and leave a walking stick (4 foot limit). icon_wink.gif

 

 

Unknown objects are operating under intelligent control... It is imperative that we learn where UFO's come from and what their purpose is... - -Admiral Roscoe H. Hillenkoetter Director, Central Intelligence Agency 1947-1950

Link to comment

quote:
Originally posted by sbukosky:

 

But for a regular cache, I agree the ammo box with an intact gasket is hard to beat. Just be sure to put geocaching identification on the outside, over the yellow letters. It lets people know it is not a threatening device.

 

Steve Bukosky N9BGH

Waukesha Wisconsin


 

That's exactly what I was going to say...good thing I read the replies first. With the 2 regular size caches I've placed I've used ammo cans (one 50 cal and the other 30 cal). When I was at the army surplus store I went through all the cans to find the ones in the best shape (little rust, no dents and intact gaskets) as some of them were pretty beat up. I wouldn't have trusted some of them to keep the contents dry. So I spent a few extra minutes there and grabbed several so I have 'em ready to go when I want to place another one. One has been in the field since September, though heavy rains, and more recently snow, and no problems yet. The other was just listed yesterday, but the box has been sitting in snow (it was actually buried in a snow drift when I found it again) for about a week. I originally placed it to introduce my brother to geocaching and hid some of his Christmas gifts in there. I was going to turn it into a cache on Christmas after he found his gifts, but I forgot the cache loot in the car. So I went back yesterday. No problems at all with that one either.

 

I also use a model car paint marker to mark the outside of the cans. I use a gold colored one...It's great because it still stays fairly camoed, but it stands out enough to make it distinguishable as a geocache. I always mark the cache name, coordinates, my "on-line" name, and the Geocache website. Inside, I include the stash note with the first few lines highlighted and on top so it's the first thing you see when you open it. Hopefully that way if someone stumbles across it, they'll be more inclined to read it and realize what it is. I also stash a print out of the actual cache page from the site in there.

 

Mr. 0

 

"Remember that nature and the elements are neither your friend or your enemy - they are actually disinterested."

 

Department of the Army Field Manual FM 21-76 "Survival" Oct. 1970

Link to comment

quote:
Originally posted by Jamie Z:

I have a coffee can in my closet right now that was used as a cache container. It is rusted inside and out, and when I finally rescued the cache and replaced the container with an ammo box, the contents of the coffee can were ruined. The logbook was hardly legible because the paper was so rust-stained. Unless you're using some other kind of can, I don't think they're a good idea.

Jamie


 

Well, I guess it all depends on the cache and where it is located. In my area of Southern California, we get about 15 inches of rain per year and that hardly comes all at once. If you put the coffee can in a plastic bag and place the cache in an area that wouldn't get too wet to begin with, I think it'd be ok.

 

~Heidi

 

Take it to the ORG

 

[This message was edited by NiteHeidi on December 29, 2002 at 09:09 PM.]

Link to comment

I've always used RUbbermaid or similar containers. However, tis morning, I have to drive to PA about 85 miles to replace one of them that was eaten trough by some critter. It was discovered by the first cacher! No food in it although I did have Anti Bite cream stick. Maybe the smell of that attracted it - or maybe it needed the Garrity pen light!

 

In any case, I finaly succumbed and I'm bringing an ammo box to replace the eaten plastic one which will become my standard now at least in woodsy type areas where the bigger box has more hiding places. Driving 85 miles each time will become a drag real fast.

 

Alan

Link to comment

quote:
Originally posted by NiteHeidi:

 

I guess it all depends on the cache and where it is located.


That's a good point, since in this area, we get lots and lots of rain. I just can't imagine a coffee can holding up well by itself. I suppose with regular maintenance...

 

quote:
If you put the coffee can in a plastic bag...
Uh oh.. now you've opened a new can of worms. Check out Plastic Sacks and Cache Containers.

 

Jamie

Link to comment

Think what you are saying. It's cache in and trash out not the other way around. It would think it to be a pretty good hide however. Most people wouldn't touch it if it were in plain site.

In Florida a coffee can wouldn't last a week and the plastic bag becomes soaked. If it actually does stay dry, snakes love to use them to warm up.

 

Shudder

 

The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Link to comment

If you go the extra yard...

Use PVC glue and install a cap on one end.

And on the opening end use a Plumbers Rubber Screw Plug.

Some folks call them freeze plugs.

They have a T handle on them, and as you screw the thing down in expands and make a very good seal...

Only thing is this is sort of an expensive way to do things..

Ammo Can at Gun and Knife show...around 5 bucks depending on the size...

And remember, at these shows, most people will barter..

5 bucks for one, or 20 bucks for 6, you get the idea....

Link to comment

quote:
Originally posted by BrianSnat:

The real culprits are dollar store plastic containers, Gladware and deli/Chinese food containers. They tend to fail very quickly.


I think your talking about Aero/Aeroware and thats crappy stuff. I got a couple of those and they came out the package warped so the lids wouldn't seal. After correcting that problem, mainly hot water and rubber bands icon_rolleyes.gif, and getting them seal. I moved on to "field" testing, I decided that if anything was touching the lid at all it would come off since they dont 'snap' very tight. And I also noticed that a strong breeze would pop the lids off icon_mad.gif So stay away from the stuff it doesn't work...

(btw- Gladware's crap too)

quote:
by Jamie Z

I have a coffee can in my closet right now that was used as a cache container. It is rusted inside and out, and when I finally rescued the cache and replaced the container with an ammo box, the contents of the coffee can were ruined. The logbook was hardly legible because the paper was so rust-stained. Unless you're using some other kind of can, I don't think they're a good idea.


I had a couple caches start out as coffee cans. I never had a major problems with rust. Course I primed and painted them inside and out (seems like a lot of work for a coffee can icon_wink.gif). And everything was in ziplocks too.

But I changed them over to ammo cans, because didn't want to have to go replace the plastic lids every 3 months (They started cracking very quickly icon_eek.gif)

 

waypoint_link.gif22008_1700.gif37_gp_logo88x31.jpg

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 0
×
×
  • Create New...