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Boots all the way. You never know what you may run into out in the wild so its best to go prepared.

 

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Confused New Owner Of a Garmin GPS V Received on 10-03-02

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For most of my Geocache adventures I wear my Salomon hiking boots. In addition to cache hunts, they've been many backpacking and hiking trips as and are still holding up after 3 years of heavy use. I have a pair of Merrill Jungle Mocs (Centaur's preferred shoe), but I can't imagine using them for anything beyond going to the mall, or for the shortest of urban cache hunts.

 

For really good prices on hiking boots and other outdoor footware try here,where I paid $79 for my Salomons and saw the exact boot for $149 in a local outdoor store a few weeks later.

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quote:
Originally posted by Acceptable Risk:

Twice now someone's mentioned "OMG, you came down *that* in sneakers? So I'm convinced that I need to get some shoes... Not boots, shoes...

 

I'm looking at REI now and see some spiffy cheapo shoes...

 

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?productId=12372194&storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&langId=-1

 

Do they really make a difference?

 

http://www.acceptable-risk.com/images/geosig.jpg

Contents Under Pressure...


 

I went looking for something that was not quite a boot, but still a little more than a running shoe on steroids.

 

I found these:

Vasque Fusion GTX

and I really, really like them. Light weight, so they don't feel clunky. They give a bit of ankle support but don't feel like your foot is encased. They're Gore-Tex lined so your feet actually stay dry.

 

And now they're on sale. Maybe I'll buy another pair to have in reserve!

 

-Paul

 

icon_geocachingwa.gif

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IMHO I've found that nearly any shoe that has an agressive tread can work well for hiking and climbing. The thing i find people have the most trouble with when wearing a tennis shoe is they aren't securely attached to the person's feet. As long as you tie your shoes tightly traction isn't much of an issue and you don't get blisters from your feet sliding inside the shoes. If traction is a big issue for you wear golf cleats. I tend to favor a more comfortable shoe traction is secondary. I've never found traction to be an issue when I climb any hill that you would not call extreeme.

 

Eeyore

 

It took a GPS to get me away from technology.

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I wear sneaks, but I DO have a problem with traction. In my area of the country, rotting wet logs and leaves can be like ice. I've had more than one stumble from lack of traction.

 

I've looked around a little for something of a cross between a sneaker and hiking boot, but everything I've found so far is like tying a board to my foot.

 

I do have a pair of old jungle boots from my military days, but they are old and worn. The last time I went out in those it was about a 3 mile hike and got a good blister on my toe. That's too bad because they are light, tough, flexible though with a steel shank, good protection for my ankle from twisting and shins from brambles. ...and dadgum good traction!

 

I might try them again, but make sure of good padded socks.

 

[sissy hates them and generally doesn't even like for me to wear them, so I haven't pushed the issue after getting blistered... icon_frown.gif ]

 

CR

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I spent a friggin' $145.00 on a pair of Asolo boots and almost didn't make it out of the woods one day they hurt my feet so bad. So I have been wearing a cheap, really cheap, pair of boots I got at Walmart. Before they fall apart I must find new boots. Luckily I went to EMS where I bought the Asolos and told the salesperson about my predicament and that I bought them over a year ago, and I don't have the receipt, and she said no problem, they want to keep the customer satisfied. She said I could bring them back in and they would check the wear and tear, and give me a credit towards a new pair. I thought that was pretty darned fair of them. From now on I am going to walk aruond in any boots for at least a 1/2 an hour in the store before I purchase them. I also find too many boots today are slippery when wet. We have several caches around CT that involve climbing up beside waterfalls, and with my fear of heights I want to feel safe. And with my feet I would NEVER consider buying any boot I could not try on first. Sending the back and waiting for them is too much of a pain. The most comfortable thing so far were my old work boots, but they wore out.

 

Cache you later,

Planet

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Boots.

 

I tried caching with shoes, and sneakers, and it doesn't work.

 

10 years ago, I purchased boots specifically for Austrian Alpen climbing, and they're still going strong. I paid over $100 for them, but that's averaging $10/year, not too bad?

 

Unfortunately, I have no idea what kind of boots they are, other than having Gortex. They're waterproof, and I can slog thru pretty much anything.

 

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Do not answer a fool according to his folly, lest you be also be like him.

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Personally, I like my New Balance hiking shoes. We have a NB store over near us, and every now and then they'll have a great sale. Picked up my last 2 pairs for around $40 ea. I use them for everyday as well as outdoor activities, they last quite a while, considering how I usually abuse my footwear.

 

A few months back I bought a pair of hiking shoes at the North Face for $25, but they don't have nearly as nice a fit. Right now they're lost somewhere in our apartment, and I'm not in too big of a rush to find them.

 

It really depends on what people like personally, and what condition they're in. When I was in college I hiked the canyon twice in 1 summer, with a pair of (I think it was) Nike hiking shoes. I've tried on stuff with more ankle support, but haven't found anything that I like, yet. IMHO, if you look where you're going you'll probably be ok without boots.

 

I walk the Maze of Moments, but everywhere I turn to, begins a new beginning, but never finds a finish..

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I started caching in sneakers, which were fine for SoCal urban caches, but when I needed a better set of boots I was on a tight budget. I bought a cheap pair of hiking boots from Walmart for about $29. That was a year, and about 130 caches ago and they still look brand new. They're waterproof , well broken in and very sturdy. Not to mention more comfortable than my sneakers ever were. I can even run easily in them. They were originally bought as a temporary fix until I could afford "good" boots, but I'll keep wearing them until they fall apart. From the looks of them, I'd say that will be another 5 years.

 

(Please don't flame me for shopping at Walmart! icon_eek.gif)

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quote:
I bought a cheap pair of hiking boots from Walmart for about $29. That was a year, and about 130 caches ago and they still look brand new. They're waterproof , well broken in and very sturdy. Not to mention more comfortable than my sneakers ever were. I can even run easily in them. They were originally bought as a temporary fix until I could afford "good" boots, but I'll keep wearing them until they fall apart. From the looks of them, I'd say that will be another 5 years.

 

A friend of mine had a cheapo pair of hiking boots from Walmart that he used to brag about. He'd have a good laugh about our expensive boots. They did last him a couple of years and looked fine, but on one backpacking trip the sole

separated from the boot. No warning. First on one boot and shortly after, on the other. He basically had to hike out 3 miles in his socks.

Several years later I'm still using the boots that he got a good laugh at.

 

"Life is a daring adventure, or it is nothing" - Helen Keller

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What makes a difference is whether your feet are happy in the shoes or not--do the shoes fit? Are the shoes going to stand up to usage?

 

I wear Ecco Receptors (trail sandals) for daily walks through the woods; most caches that I find are in these sandals or my other pair of Eccos. I love them.

 

I wear Hi-tek Catalysts for more rugged walking (did 5+ miles of Kentucky's Red River Gorge today in them.) I have a decade-old pair of Vasque Sundowners getting their second sole repair. I wear them for serious hiking with backpacks or very bad rocky trails.

 

These shoes suit my feet and my needs. They might not suit another females with the same foot size; she might weigh a different weight, walk with a different stride, and not like having her toes get wet.

 

It's worth spending the time to get it right and then spending the time to maintain the shoes--if you hurt your feet, you have to crawl home on your hands and knees.

 

--

wcgreen

Wendy Chatley Green

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The Salomons you have bookmarked from REI are trail running shoes. I own a similar pair from Asics but I'm getting ready to buy a new set, possibly those same Salomons or even a North Face.

 

I do use my trail shoes for geocaching when I know that the terrain will be relatively flat or if I actually want to combine the hunt with a little bit of running. However, if I think that the terrain requires an uphill hike and/or will be rough and tough, then I use a lightweight pair of hiking boots.

 

The boots I use are made by Timberland and I purposely got a lightweight model. It's very comfortable and gives me enough ankle support and traction. It also has enough flex in it to allow me to jog on the trail when needed --- my geocaching husky companions do like to break out into a run every now and then and I have no choice but to comply. I do need to buy a different pair for our snowshoe trips once snow starts to cover the local Southern California mountains.

 

BTW, you can get those same Salomon shoes slightly cheaper at www.roadrunnersports.com. After shipping, it's probably cheaper to just go get it from REI, if there's one close to you. Nonetheless, you probably should still check out their website IF you are in the market for trail running shoes as they do have different ratings, reviews, and general info that would give a better idea on a shoe's fit, form and functionality.

 

Or you can give Imelda Marcos a call and ask her opinion.... icon_wink.gif

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All but the simplest 1/1 caches and urban caches are done in my LL Bean Maine Hunting Shoes. 100 caches in the forests, hills and creeks of Pennsylvania, Ohio and New York, and not a drop of water has leaked through to my socks. Rubber bottoms for keeping dry and leather uppers for keeping comfy is a killer combination. They're also available with GoreTex or Thinsulate.

 

M31180_Tan_Brown.jpg

 

x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-

What would life be like if there were no hypothetical questions?

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Those guys at REI are awesome...

 

This poor fellow sat down with me and asked exactly what I do, where I've hiked, etc... He recommended two and I finally chose these...

 

Salomon Dispatch

 

They were easily the best fitting... And it was a huge difference walking around on their simulated rock thingy...

 

I wish they weren't such a funky color... Not that I'm some kinda sissy, but I do at least wanna look like I don't dress in the dark icon_smile.gif

 

geosig.jpg

Contents Under Pressure...

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And so do I. These old Canadian military jobbies really do the job! They're waterproof and good on most types of terrain (except ice - Doh!). I throw them on, go geocaching, and take them off in the garage after. I don't think they're actually been in the house in the past 4 years. Most of the crud from the last outing falls off on the very next one.

geoboots.jpg

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quote:
Originally posted by 1NatureMom:

Shoes? Man, ya gotta go barefoot!!

 

Don't laugh, throw them shoes over your sholder, and try up rock barefoot!

 

icon_smile.gif


 

I go barefoot whenever possible. One of my caches is placed so that people are forced to go barefoot for part of it. Going barefoot isn't always practical though here in Texas. What with sharp limestone, fireants, and asphalt that'll fry an egg in summer. icon_frown.gif

 

The Bohican

 

--

Welcome to nowhere.nu. Now go home!

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quote:
Originally posted by Acceptable Risk:

 

I wish they weren't such a funky color... Not that I'm some kinda sissy, but I do at least wanna look like I don't dress in the dark icon_smile.gif

 


 

As far as shoes go now adays those are good looking shoes. I've been looking for a new pair of shoes to wear to work and every store i go into has shoes that appear to have been designed for walking on the moon or being the after product of an accident in the dye shop.

 

Eeyore

 

My other cachemobile is a broom!

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I love my LLBean Gore-Tex Cresta Hikers - $170 of the best money spent on my feet next to my Rebok DMS Fooitball cleats.

 

Cresta Hikers

 

These have served me well, as I now wear them every day. And they look it right now. I amgoing to go get me another pair just for hiking and keep wearing these for everyday.

 

Goto someplace like LL Bean, REI or Hudtson Trail and talk to the sales people, I have found that they are nice and honest and willing to really help you out with what you NEED.

 

-Robert

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wcgreen, I once lived in KY and loved the Red River Gorge. I still talk about it to this day. I remember a path that leads out to a point that looks over a valley with caves all over the side of the cliff across the way and sitting on this point that dropped right off, and all of a sudden these climbers popped up from the side of the cliff and quite surprised us. Way cool place! Thanks for reminding me of it again. icon_biggrin.gif Good memory.

 

Cache you later,

Planet

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Boots: Hi-Tec Eclipse Lite Plus.

 

They're really comfortable. I got a great deal on them at Sports Authority. The boots were on closeout but since my wife bought boots at the same time, we got hers for half off. Total cost for two pairs of boots: $39.

 

Anywhere is "walking distance" if you have the time.

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quote:
Originally posted by BrianSnat:

A friend of mine had a cheapo pair of hiking boots from Walmart that he used to brag about. He'd have a good laugh about our _expensive_ boots. They did last him a couple of years and looked fine, but on one backpacking trip the sole

separated from the boot. No warning. First on one boot and shortly after, on the other. He basically had to hike out 3 miles in his socks.

Several years later I'm still using the boots that he got a good laugh at.


 

Hasn't he ever heard of duct tape? It's saved the day countless times.

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I was out looking for boots today and I've had the sdame problems that many of you have had except I make it harder on myself. I refuse to buy anything made in China. Unfortunately most shoes are made there except fot the high-end stuff. I finally found some made in Indonesia, sure they have their problems,, but they're a far cry better than China.

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I got nice pair of light Teva hiking boots that I've used for the past 8 months and they're doing fine. Light and comfortable but they have a good grippy sole with enough ankle support to get you over the rough stuff. Since they're light I can scramble over bolders when I need to and even out run bears and mountain lions when they're trying to beat me to a cache.

 

george

 

Pedal until your legs cramp up and then pedal some more.

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My wife picked up a pair of Customatix sneaks a while back. They're pretty cool. I've been considering the "Think Tank" boots but I'm a bit wary about purchasing and designing a pair at $100 site unseen. I may try one out one of these days.

 

I personally have Timberland boots. They're waterproof (It is Seattle, you know) and very functional for easy/medium hikes. My next pair will probably be a Rockport, since I was told by a podiatrist they are good for flat feet. If any flat footers have good recommendations for shoes, I'd love to hear about it!

 

As an aside, last year I heard a talk from a woman who did a solo trip along the Pacific Crest Trail. Her recommendation was to travel with sneakers. You have to trust someone who hiked that far!

 

Jeremy Irish

Groundspeak - The Language of Location

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quote:
Originally posted by Jeremy Irish:

My wife picked up a pair of http://www.customatix.com/ sneaks a while back. They're pretty cool. I've been considering the "Think Tank" boots but I'm a bit wary about purchasing and designing a pair at $100 site unseen. I may try one out one of these days.


 

Great now my wife wants the Mariners shoes. icon_wink.gif

 

http://home.earthlink.net/~whidbeywalk/

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My preferred shoes are Teva's. Summer Winter On the trail In the Water. Sometimes even with socks. They just happen to fit my short wide, high volume feet better than any other brand. There for, when I cache, its in my sandles or approach shoes. I also have their dressy shoes for work (if you can call them dressy!)

icon_biggrin.gif

 

Time Flies like an arrow. Fruit Flies like a banana

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quote:
Originally posted by 1NatureMom:

Shoes? Man, ya gotta go barefoot!!

 

Don't laugh, throw them shoes over your sholder, and try up rock barefoot!

 

icon_smile.gif


 

I was scanning the channels last night and caught the most fascinating thing on MSNBC. There's a group of Arab speaking nomads in the desert that have to hunt game to supplement their diet of bread and lentils in absolutely huge sandstone mountains.

 

It was amazing. They climbed thousand foot sandstone rocks barefoot with no safety gear while carrying WWII era carbines. It wasn't sport for them; it's survival.

 

Sorry I don't have any more details on them, but I found it particularly ironic since we'd just returned from the Valley of Fireand a day of scrambling on sandstone!

 

As for shoes, I can't say how much I love my new Timberland Rapid Trail Light Hikers. They feel more like sandals than hiking boots. I'm all about foot comfort and not sweating, so when I tried them on at Just for Feet, I was amazed! I was so impressed that I practically forced my wife to get a pair. She really didn't want to be bothered, but when she felt one of mine, she had to try a pair in her size. After the "Buy one, get one at 50%" and an additional $20 off coupon, we paid $115 for both pairs.

 

I haven't used them caching yet, but they did so well at VoF yesterday that I can't wait to go back!

 

Watch Ebay, too. After falling in love with these Timberland, my wife found a new pair of Timberland Mountain Athletics in my size. We won them for $32.

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Runaround was singing the praises of the Merrell Runaround and I have to agree. they are priced well and are great to walk in and almost as light as wearing slippers! The only drawback I've found is the longevity of the soles-8 months and they are about as thin as bedroom slippers. Would I buy another set? Only as soon as I can get to Albuquerque (the nearest REI outlet)! icon_biggrin.gif

 

Children today are tyrants. They contradict their parents, gobble their food, and tyrannize their teachers. - Socrates

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i like the altama black jungle combat boots, i wear them all the time and about everyday, they keep my feet dry and are about indestructable

they are made of nylon and leather and have drain holes in the instep, so if you step in a puddle or walk through a creek they dry out pretty fast, i have gone backpacking in the mountains (walking on rocks the whole time)and on a canoe trip (getting in and out of water dozens of times a day)with them, they work great wet or dry and are really comfortable, and you can throw a pair of wool socks on and wear them in the winter when its really cold, i always geocache in them!

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We pretty much go with the ultra-lightweight philosophy when it comes to hiking.

 

New Balance 8xx series lighter than sneakers and all the traction of hiking boots. $70-$100

 

Libby & I wear shorts and sandals most of the summer but now that it's cooling down shoes make more sense.

 

Rusty...

 

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Friends don't let friends cache locationless!

 

Rusty & Libby's Geocache Page

Michigan Geocaching Organization

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