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Taking GPS on commercial airplane


JMerritt
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Has anyone had any trouble taking their GPS on a commercial airliner? I'd love to see if I could catch any signals while sitting on the plane, but I don't want to risk getting it taken from me or raising any suspicions and finding myself being questioned or delayed.

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This was a long thread somewhere else on the site (under Canada, I think), but I'm not clever enough to find it and link :-(

 

The long and short was many folk have good experiences (me inlc - the stewardesses thought it was soooooo cool), but Alaska Air (for one) does not allow them at all.

 

If your going to use it, call and ask the airline... then show the steward/stewardess and they might want to show the pilot (This is VERY inmportant - in this day and age, DONT try to be discreet, as discreet = secretive = dangerous = lots of guys with badges and guns.)

 

Take along a small atlas, to mark your positions, alt & speed. Watch your speedometer as you take off... wheeeeeeeeeee!

 

Enjoy

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My wife is a flight attendant for Delta Air Lines and her onboard manual says that GPS is ok to use! It even says that suction cup antennas on the windows are ok! We fly quite a bit and I have never had a problem with my gps on the tray table. Once a flight attendenat thought I had a cell phone so I told her it was GPS she gave me the thumbs up!

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Recently flew on United Airlines from Milwaukee to Florida. Before leaving I checked their website. They had a complete list of 1)what items were not allowed to be used on the airplane at all, 2)What items could only be used while the plane is parked at the gate; and 3)What items could be used at the gate, shut off during takeoff and landing, but OK to use at cruise altitude. The GPSr was specifically listed in the 3rd group. So I printed off that page of info from the web and took it with me. I did not specifically ask the flight attendant or pilot, but was prepared in case I was asked. It's not a bad idea to call ahead and/or ask the flight attendant when you board. Incidentally -- the track log from the flight is way cool. Never seen speeds & altitudes like that on my GPS before! Also interesting to see what you flew over.

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I recently flew from New Hampshire to Arizona and used my Garmin Etrex with no issues. I would not suggest using it until the plane is at the altitude when they allow cd players and such. It should not matter either way however, because a regular GPS will only *recieve* the signals. The only bad things to have on a plane are the type of devices that transmit signals, ie cellphones, walkie talkies... I would not suggest using a Garmin Rino for the reason, or the Garmin cell phone/GPS, but other than that I don't see a problem.

 

(The max speed got up to 608mph in a little jet!! Is's very nice for calcuating the ETA as well)

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I was flying airtran and was using my GPS. The FA asked me to turn it off saying the FAA did not allow them, that it would interfere with airplanes navigation instruments. I think now it is up to the individual airline.. I am flying Delta for now on..

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quote:
Originally posted by Big W:

I was flying airtran and was using my GPS. The FA asked me to turn it off saying the FAA did not allow them, that it would interfere with airplanes navigation instruments. I think now it is up to the individual airline.. I am flying Delta for now on..


 

I would have told her I'll gladly comply and stow the unit, but I'd ask her to please talk with the pilot when she has a chance and verify that he thinks a GPS receiver would interfere.

 

That way you're not coming off as argumentative (worst thing you can do at an airport or on an airline these days), but just wanting to get her educated (which she won't appreciate, but she can't complain about you either since you're complying).

 

Hell, bring a print-out from another airline next time and ask her why it is Delta or whowever specifically allows it ;-p

 

Err, don't put it like that, again, be pleasant and agree to comply right away, but mention that you'd checked around at airline websites and found information saying that it's permitted on many of them.

 

Jason Roysdon

jason.roysdon.net

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This is the policy for AWA.

 

Due to possible interference with communication and navigation systems it is "company policy" to prohibit the operation of certain PED's in the cabin.

 

There are 3 classifications of phase of flight when PED's may be operated in the A/C cabin.

1. At any time.

2. Only while aircraft is parked and the A/C door is open.

3. Allowed only in flight above 10000 feet(may not be operated during taxi, takeoff, approach, and landing).

 

GPS receivers(global positioning systems) are listed as a number 2.

 

This update is as of 10-01-02.

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There is a thread in the general forums from just a few days ago, Using you GPSr on an airplane that goes indepth into why all personal electronic devices are banned on takeoff/landing, and why some airlines (like Airtran) won't allow any type of radio receivers to be used at all. The short version, almost all electronic devices actually emit a small radio signal. That's why many of them have a FCC id # assigned to them, it certifies the radio emissions conform to a certain standard. Sometimes a device malfunctions, or several devices together can combine to make a strong enough signal to interfere with navigation systems on a plane. It's very rare, but it does happen. At 40,000 ft, There is plenty of time to go thru the cacbin and ask people to turn things off until the problem is located. During takeoff/landing, the pilot may have to make a split second decision based of his nav readings, a sudden problem here could be very dangerous.

The FAA law allows the pilot to decide if he will allow a PED to be operated or not. Most airlines have a policy regarding them, but in the air, the pilot's decision is law. If he says turn it off, arguing with him and showing website printouts from other airlines that allow it is only going to get you carried off the plane by federal marshalls as soon as you land.

 

Tae-Kwon-Leap is not a path to a door, but a road leading forever towards the horizon.

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On an Alaska Airlines flight from Portland OR to San Jose, CA two weeks ago, a Flight Attendant noticed my Garmin on the tray table. She found her supervisor who sat beside me and asked if it was a GPSr. I repiled that it was and she informed me that it was not allowed. OK, so I quickly switched it off and she then asked me where we were according to the GPS? Uh, you just asked me to switch it off. Geez

 

Last week when I flew on ATA from San Jose to Boston, I had it sitting on the tray table in a folded newspaper. Nobody noticed.

 

It is better to ask forgiveness than seek permission.

 

BTW I am a commericial rated pilot, not that it matters. Airlines make their own rules that the Pilots have to follow.

 

MtM

 

*****************************************

This Space Intentionally Left Blank

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This is a sore point with me as I fly somewhat often. I forget what airline I was on but the magazine said GPS was ok to use on this airline. I had my Garmin V up to the window and the flight attendant said I had to turn it off! Possessing a certain amount of wisdom, I turned it off rather than press a point.

 

Now, being a good paying customer of an industry begging for customers and yet treats them not very well and provides accommodations that stink like a dead skunk in the sun, I don't think it is unreasonable to ask that a new study of this situation with GPS's be made and a final determination be done to either allow their use or not. When sitting in a cramped space for two hours or more, I'd like to use my GPS to help keep my mind off of what I paid these airlines for their less than pleasant service

 

Steve Bukosky N9BGH

Waukesha Wisconsin

 

[This message was edited by sbukosky on March 30, 2003 at 07:43 PM.]

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I had a new experience with the GPSr on a United flight over the weekend. Before we took off, I asked the attendent if using a GPS was ok. She said no, because they were banned by the FAA. Hmmmm...I said that I didn't think that was the case, that it was up to each airline. I asked if she could ask the captain. She said she did, and that I needed to show her where on the label it was "licensed as a class 'b' device." Of course my Sportrak Map doesn't say that, so she said I had to put it away in the overhead compartment.

 

On the return flight, I asked the captain myself, and he said, "Sure. No problem. There is no official policy." I asked him why some airlines had banned them and he said it has nothing to do with the electronics, per se, but more to do with the notion that you could take over the plane and navigate with one..."or jump out the plane over the 'X.'" We both laughed at that.

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Here is Delta's policy. I had to wait for the ok announcement for portable electronic devices to turn it on. I really wanted to see it at takeoff but alas I followed the rules.

 

The GPS was nice to see how long we had to go to get to our destination. It's also nice to see what cities you're flying over. Although, on the way back home I had the chance to fly 1st class. They have a map with your current position up there. They also tell you the ground speed, tail/head wind, and outside temp.

 

kc

row, row, row your boat

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Whats really fun is to have an Aircraft GPS (like a lowrance airmap 100). You then know why your probably heading north when your destination is southwest. In my case we were heading towards an "intersection" and my track clearly showed us turn to a new heading at the intersection.

 

The GPS shows navigational intersections and warns you when you are entering/approaching different airspaces.

 

Once they parked us out in the middle of nowwhere, continually making flying in a circle. Guess they were giving more time to clear out congestion where we were going.

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Flying from Detroit to Louisville, Ky this weekend, I asked the flight attendant about using my GPSr at altitude (I made sure to say "at altitude") when we were boarding. I was still within earshot and heard the captain say "Sure!"

 

Once electronic devices were allowed, I looked out my window at Toledo; Dayton and Cincinnati were out the other window icon_frown.gif. Speed stayed around 460mph, elevation around 28700ft. Before we hit cloud cover, I saw the airport symbol on the display, looked out the window and saw the small town airport (one runway for private planes). The accuracy bounced between 50 and 90 feet with my window seat and tray table. I wish I could have used it during take-off/ascent and descent/landing, just to look at the numbers.

 

This was too cool. I suggest everyone to take their unit when they fly, but be sure to get permission.

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The scariest part of ALL this discussion is that we need to worry about falling out of the sky because of ANY portable electronic stuff. How is it that an airplane can take a direct hit from a bolt of lightning and keep on trucking, but if you flip on your GPS (which they no doubt have in the cabin anyway) we're in danger of meeting the maker???

 

Scary...

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On a recent American Airlines flight from Columbus, OH to Dallas, TX, the flight attendant told me to put away my GPSr - bummer! I did take occasional readings just to see where we were. On the next leg from Dallas to San Francisco, that flight attendant asked me if I had one and told me not to use it - I guess the first one had pegged me as a user??

 

Anyway, from SF back to Columbus on Delta, I used it =with= my antenna and all was cool. I sure enjoy knowing what each little town and river is!

 

Japer

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Recently read an article in either Pop Science or Pop Mech. about the whole "electronics on board" routine. Basically it's all B.S.! Anyway, I turn mine on & wait till I'm told to turn it off, then I ask for them to check with the captain. Is there really anyone out there that believes a multi million dollar plane can have it's avionics disrupted by a couple of hand held radios & a few GPS units?! (especially while there are signals thousands of time stronger emanating from ALL OVER the airport itself!) Guess that says alot about american engineering. I know, I can see the headline now: "Terrorists take over airliner by turning on thier cell phones!" Puuuhhhllleeeaaassssee!

 

Wherever you go, there you are!

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quote:
On the return flight, I asked the captain myself, and he said, "Sure. No problem. There is no official policy." I asked him why some airlines had banned them and he said it has nothing to do with the electronics, per se, but more to do with the notion that you could take over the plane and navigate with one..."or jump out the plane over the 'X.'" We both laughed at that.

 

I think Cire Yamel may be on the right track, GPSr are not transmitters, they are passive receivers, and therefore do not affect any of the aircraft navigation systems. My work involves high precision positioning under water, part of which which includes surface GPS, and there used to be a concern that mobile phones would have an effect, something I have to be aware of, particularly when dealing with putting divers in the right place - anyway, no effect from mobile phones whatsoever and they are transmitters!

 

This business of phones, laptops, GPSr, having an effect on plane navigation systems, even on take off and landing is, I think, B.S. !

 

Any scientists able to confirm this ?

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On May 12, 2003, Cire Yamel wrote:

quote:
I asked if she could ask the captain. She said she did, and that I needed to show her where on the label it was "licensed as a class 'b' device." Of course my Sportrak Map doesn't say that, so she said I had to put it away in the overhead compartment.

 

The device itself may not say it, but the Garmin Etrex Legend manual does! icon_wink.gif So, THERE! Take your manual with you and show them if they raise this issue.

 

I took mine with me to South America. 11 legs on the round trip. I think it's awesome to see speeds of 600MPH and altitudes of 40,000 Feet! TAME, the Ecuadorian national airline, does not allow any PEDs on their flights. What they didn't see didn't hurt them icon_razz.gif

 

After the trip, I was able to show the saved tracks to my brother's family, where our planes (coming and going) flew over their town in North Carolina. They got a kick out of that.

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quote:
Originally posted by thisguytim:

This is the policy for AWA.

 

Due to possible interference with communication and navigation systems it is "company policy" to prohibit the operation of certain PED's in the cabin.

 

There are 3 classifications of phase of flight when PED's may be operated in the A/C cabin.

1. At any time.

2. Only while aircraft is parked and the A/C door is open.

3. Allowed only in flight above 10000 feet(may not be operated during taxi, takeoff, approach, and landing).

 

GPS receivers(global positioning systems) are listed as a number 2.

 

This update is as of 10-01-02.


 

Where on the site did you find this? I'm curious if there have been any changes in the last 7 months.

 

Brian

Team A.I.

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I agree. I'm not a scientist nor an electronic engineer but common sense dictates that it would be impossible for aircraft avionics to be affected by puny transmitters such as cellphones, etc.

Look at it tis way...if these things were so damned "dangerous" why haven't some deranged terrorists used these to bring down planes. Much easier to smuggle onboard a cellphone and leave it it...

 

Just plain stupid policies.

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I recently flew Southwest from Birmingham to Washington, D.C. The Southwest inflight magazine lists GPSr's (without integrated radios) as devices that can be used inflight as long as you are about 10,000 feet (same as CD players, computers, etc.).

 

I didn't flaunt my use of it, but I had a window seat and kept it in the window ledge near my head. Neat track in ExpertGPS and cool to know your altitude, speed, and heading while airborne.

 

*NOT RECOMMENDED* but, I have heard of people who place their GPSr in the window ledge, cover it with an airline pillow and "nap" during takeoff and landing to record the entire trip. I don't want anyone to get thrown off the plane, cause a flight delay, and/or have their GPSr confiscated, but the track logs from these flights are available on the web. Pretty cool.

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Mopar has the right idea

 

I'm an electrical engineer, maybe i can expain the 'issue' with electronic devices.

From an electronic point of view:

Basically, whenever electricity flows, it creates a field. Think electromagnets you made in 5th grade - wrap a wire around an iron nail, attach a battery, and the nail is magnetic.

Whenever there's an electric field, it causes electricity to flow in anything that conducts. Think holding a static-charged towel close to a florecent bulb - the bulb will light up.

This means that any time you use anything electronic, it creates a field that can interfere with other electronics. with most portable devices, this is miniscule, but it does still exist. This doesn't mean the other device will fail, but it could get messed up - think about putting speakers too close to your TV.

Now, from an engineering point of view:

Boeing, Airbus, and everyone else have to design the computer systems in their airplanes. Because it's a critical system that means life or death, they have to test it very carefully and extensively. Under normal conditions, lets say an airplane will be fine 99.999% of the time. If a GPS running anywhere in the plane changes that to 99.998%, then that's grounds enough to not allow them. Chances are, though, they don't bother testing the case where a passenger has a gps and so they simply say they shouldn't be used - meaning they can't guarantee 99.999% sucess because they haven't tested.

 

The bottom line is that electronics could cause a problem but the odds of it happening are so slim it's truly not worth considering.

 

-Joe

"Can't spell geek without EE"

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I think the airlines that do not allow their use in-flight are (somewhat understandably) overzealous. "If an electronic device causes interference to our aircraft, and the airplane crashes, we would be sued because we allowed the device to be operated. So, let's not allow them to be operated." Or, they're simply just not doing their homework. They incorrectly associate portable GPS receivers as "radios", which are known to cause interference. But then there are some models which DO integrate two-way communications into the GPSr. So, as an airline executive, do you spend thousands of dollars to train thousands of employees how to spot a two-way GPSr from a regular GPSr? ...or do you just say, "@*%$ it!", and simply not allow them at all...?

 

From that perspective, it could be a tough call. For me, I'll fly Delta instead of American. I love my GPSr and will only fly airlines that will allow me to use it!

 

Some very interesting reading on PED interference:

 

This one documents specific cases relating to PED interference:

Hearing on Portable Electronic Devices

 

From GPSINFORMATION.net

 

Testimony: Do They Really Pose a Safety Hazard on Aircraft?

 

Aviation Today Article: PEDs

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Well, my cell phone puts out enough RF to hear in my TV audio if its close enough to the TV.

 

I've had a 2 watt walkie talkie BLANK the display on my VCR when it was keyed in close proximity.

 

Just for the record, I dont believe a GPS will interfere with aircraft avionics but I wont go as far as to say that they dont output RF (even though its just a receiver it does produce frequencies that are used to demodulate what it receives). To be sure what eminates from them is very low but you cant say with certainty it wont be a problem until it is tested in the environment that you are worried about. Structure on the plan can act as antenna possibly "ducting" and or directing the low RF field to places you might not expect.

 

Aircraft have strict testing requiremnts for any device that is allowed to be installed in that airplane.

 

Dont get me wrong...I'm just being the devils advocate here. I have used my GPS during flight on commercial aircraft and I dont worry about interference but there are arguments for NOT allowing any device that can possibly interfere with an aircrafts electronics and a radio receiver(GPS) is in that catagory.

 

Todd Snyder

 

quote:
Originally posted by JW77:

I agree. I'm not a scientist nor an electronic engineer but common sense dictates that it would be impossible for aircraft avionics to be affected by puny transmitters such as cellphones, etc.

Look at it tis way...if these things were so damned "dangerous" why haven't some deranged terrorists used these to bring down planes. Much easier to smuggle onboard a cellphone and leave it it...

 

Just plain stupid policies.


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quote:
Originally posted by Brian - Team A.I.:

quote:
Originally posted by thisguytim:

This is the policy for AWA.

 

Due to possible interference with communication and navigation systems it is "company policy" to prohibit the operation of certain PED's in the cabin.

 

There are 3 classifications of phase of flight when PED's may be operated in the A/C cabin.

1. At any time.

2. Only while aircraft is parked and the A/C door is open.

3. Allowed only in flight above 10000 feet(may not be operated during taxi, takeoff, approach, and landing).

 

GPS receivers(global positioning systems) are listed as a number 2.

 

This update is as of 10-01-02.


 

Where on the site did you find this? I'm curious if there have been any changes in the last 7 months.

 

Brian

Team A.I.


 

I work for the Airlines and this is a quote from my manual (which is updated on a regular basis) and as of today has not been changed. It is true that each airline has the decision as to whether or not they want GPSr's to be used. As for me I think the concern is GPS devises that have transmitters in them or two way communicator FRS/GRMS radios.

 

[This message was edited by thisguytim on July 24, 2003 at 01:56 AM.]

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The following is directly from the FAA web site as of today. Reading this it would appear it is up to the discretion of the carrier/pilot.

 

This does not make sense to me because if a PED effects the electronics in a Boeing 737-300 it should not matter if the 737-300 is flying for American, Delta or United.

 

http://www2.faa.gov/avr/afs/cabinsafety/FAR's/91-21.rtf

 

Through the fish-eye lens of tear stained eyes, I can barely define this moment in time...That is until I bought a GPSR.

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NEVER buy what the flight attendants tell you about GPS! It is completely B.S. First of all, the GPS doesn't SEND any signals! It is a satellite "RECEIVER"! It doesn't SEND anything, so it can't possibly interfere with the planes avionics.

 

The next time a flight attendant tells you to turn it off, tell them how the GPS works. If they don't believe you, or tell you that they have escort you off the plane or something, then.... turn it off hehe icon_biggrin.gif

 

I hate that the FAA actually enforces that rule. Considering that they are the creators of the WAAS program essentially, they should know how a GPS works...

 

Using Opera 7.1

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volks_ev71:

quote:
The next time a flight attendant tells you to turn it off, tell them how the GPS works.

 

Don't ever TELL a flight attendant ANYTHING! They have a serious axe to grind with anyone who gives them any back-talk! "Interfering with a flight crew's performance of duties" is a serious charge. They're not interested in how it works. If they don't allow it on the plane, then all they're interested in is that you have it turned off.

 

If you wanna fly with your GPS, consult the following Web page:

 

Airlines which APPROVE/DISPROVE GPS use in Flight

 

Fly on the airlines that approve - Avoid the ones that don't! Bring your user's manual that shows that the unit is FCC Class B approved in case the flight attendant asks.

 

volks_ev71:

quote:
First of all, the GPS doesn't SEND any signals! It is a satellite "RECEIVER"! It doesn't SEND anything, so it can't possibly interfere with the planes avionics.

 

All electronics emit SOME radio signals - it is inherent from the integrated circuitry. While a GPS receiver functions normally, the radio emissions are too low and of a different frequency to cause any interference to aircraft avionics. BUT, if something fails in the circuitry, it may be possible for the unit to emit stronger signals of a different frequency. I say "POSSIBLE" - not probable.

 

Anytime a plane is below 10,000 feet, it is in a critical phase of flight where the pilots won't have time to have people turn off their PEDs. Taking PEDs out of the equation during the critical phases greatly reduces the chances of any such problems happening. Above 10,000 feet, they have more time and space to figure out what the problem is and how to work around it or fix it.

 

Early in a pilot's training, he or she is taught to "trust the instruments." They are taught this because when they can't see the horizon outside, their senses tell them that the plane is turning when in fact it is straight and level. Properly functioning instruments will guide the pilot to the plane's proper flight attitude. The FAA concluded that JFK Jr.'s flying into poor weather with a lack of instrument training led to his fatal crash. Airline pilots have enough experience to trust their instruments. They love to trust their instruments. For this reason, whenever there's a problem with a navigation instrument, pilots are very quick to suspect PED interference. They somehow seem to forget that the instruments themselves can simply malfunction.

 

I'm gonna fly the airlines that allow them. And IF they say that there is a problem and they want ALL PEDs turned off, I'm gonna assume that it's MY GPSr (just to be safe), and turn it off! icon_wink.gif

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I recently took mine (Garmin Emap) on a Untied flight.. I turned ot on after we reached 10k, very cool to see. It was neat watching our path and picking out items on the ground as we flew over.

 

If you are really into GPS, I highly suggest trying this at least once.

 

Oh, make sure you get a window seat. Isle seats do not do as well for reception, much less the view.

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Yeeeeeeeah... As I mentioned earlier, it's cool to watch the tracks, see speeds of 550 - 600 M.P.H. and altitudes of 40,000 feet! I just wish I could fly the Concorde with a GPSr! Imagine speeds of 1,200 M.P.H. and altitudes of 60,000 feet.

 

I'm going to Vegas in a couple of months! Gonna buy a suction mount antenna for my eMap. I got tired of holding the Legend up to the window for 5 hours from NY to Ecuador! This will be a much more relaxing flight icon_biggrin.gif

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I used mine on a flight yesterday from Phoenix to L.A. Way too cool! Took off at 190mph, cruised at 505mph. Identified the roads, rivers, cities, lakes. I didn't bother to ask if I could use it, I just used it discretely. It is a receiver. It doesn't transmit. Our bodies emitt an electronic field but I'll be willing to bet the farm that there will NEVER be any interferance caused by a GPS unit.

 

Any belief worth having must survive doubt.

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...but I'll be willing to bet the farm that there will NEVER be any interferance caused by a GPS unit.

 

I'm always leery of using the terms "ALWAYS" and "Never", for obvious reasons. That being said, I never use those terms... icon_biggrin.gif

 

"I'm 35 Years old, I am divorced, and I live in van down by the river!" - Matt Foley

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Thing is that it might be MY FARM and the farm of 149 other people you buy! icon_rolleyes.gif

 

I'm with you in the belief that the chances of a GPSr causing interference to an airliner's avionics is VERY remote. Still, there's always that chance.

 

I work with troubleshooting computers all day every day, and I am sometimes boggled by the bizzarre things that I see icon_eek.gif

 

All it takes is that ONE instance with the corresponding chain of events...

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If you're riding on a CRJ, and ask the captain, and the captain that day happens to be me: Not only will you get permission -- I'll also look up the destination coords for you from my Jepp charts, plus any others you'd like.

 

KBI aka CaptRussell

 

Stupidity is a self-curing disease.

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If GPSRs, cell phones, or other PEDs really can cause serious problems for commercial jets, it is crazy to allow them in the cabin at all, or in baggage for that matter. Does everbody obey rules? Do visitors to national parks refrain from feeding or approaching wildlife? Not in my experience. I have also found, on a couple of occasions, that my FRS radio that was off when I boarded a plane had turned itself on when stuffed under the seat inside my fanny pack. I now take out a battery just to be sure I am complying with the rules, but I doubt everyone else does. If this is truly a hazardous situation, it should not be possible for it to occur. I doubt there is any real danger from these devices, but if there is, we are all in trouble.

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There's a few issues here:

 

- Just because someone doesn't understand why GPSr might interfere with a plane's navigation system, doesn't mean it DOESN'T interfere with a plane's navigation system.

 

As someone pointed out earlier, *all* eletronic devices radiate a certain amount of radio frequency interference, even if they are just a "passive" receiver system.

 

- A commercial passenger is not something to be messed with. The flight crew carries a tremendous amount of responsibility--including YOUR LIFE. Listen to them, respect them.

 

- Esp recently in the US, security has been stepped up another notch. This is not the time to be sneaking around with electronics, esp something that could be used for navigation on a commercial airline (think about it).

 

- But, as was also mentioned earlier, asking the *pilot* is the best option regardless of what the airline policy is. This is a case where I would not want to be asking forgiveness after (a) my GPSr has been confiscated or (;) I have been kicked off the plane.

 

http://www.tsa.gov/public/interapp/tsa_policy/tsa_policy_0010.xml

 

-r

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