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EGNOS (European WAAS) from 1st April


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BTW chaps - noticed from the ESTB website (link below) that the Inmarsat satellites visible in the UK will begin transmitting usable data by most WAAS enabled receivers (technically DO229C data) from the 1st April.

 

Garmin confirm to me that their receivers will collect and use this data to help improve the solution. We wait to see what effect this will have - give it a try and we'll doubtless discuss it here somewhere.

 

The ESTB (EGNOS Systems Test Bed) web site is at http://esamultimedia.esa.int/docs/egnos/estb/schedule.htm - It gets a bit technical, be warned ;-)

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quote:
Originally posted by Lost in Space:

quote:
Originally posted by The Hornet:

Or am I just a ......."suspicious old git"....... icon_wink.gificon_wink.gif

 


 

Well, two out of three aint bad........

 

icon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gif


 

So which 2 would that be?????

 

icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

 

Tech-no notice

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quote:
Originally posted by Nia:

quote:
Originally posted by Lost in Space:

quote:
Originally posted by The Hornet:

Or am I just a ......."suspicious old git"....... icon_wink.gificon_wink.gif

 


 

Well, two out of three aint bad........

 

icon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gif


 

So which 2 would that be?????

 

icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

 

Tech-no notice


 

Well, you could never call the Hornet suspicious......... icon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gif

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Lost in Space is right - the original yellow eTrex isn't enabled for SBAS (Space Based Augmentation Systems) like WAAS and EGNOS. Some of the other eTrex models like my Legend can track and use these signals.

 

If the system is receiving and applying corrections from the satellites a small letter D should appear in the satellite signal strength bars on the display (well, that's the way it works on my Legend any way).

 

As the EGNOS ground system is only partially operational and the entire system is in test, actual performance might not live up to some of the claims (<3m horizontal 95%) for at least a year or so .. depends on just how p**s poor the ESA project management etc is on this job.

 

For a description of WAAS and the Garmin receivers that can use these signals see:

 

http://www.garmin.com/aboutGPS/waas.html

 

Please note that this is sounding like an advert for Garmin. I'm in no way connected to that company, just a satisfied user.

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Never really looked at this WAAS stuff before, but from what I've just read on the link provided by Palmnut, it looks pretty good, offering 3mtr accuracy.

 

However, in Geocaching terms, isn't this a bit of a curate's egg? If we are all using WAAS enabled receivers to plant and find our caches, then where does the 'search' come into it? The GPSr will take us almost straight to the cache.

 

Having said that, when my ageing Garmin 12 finally gives up the ghost, you can bet I'll be getting a WAAS enabled new one! icon_smile.gif

 

Mark

----------------------

I was technical once

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quote:
However, in Geocaching terms, isn't this a bit of a curate's egg? If we are all using WAAS enabled receivers to plant and find our caches, then where does the 'search' come into it? The GPSr will take us almost straight to the cache.


 

Of course, what has to be remembered are the 1500+ caches that have been placed without the benefit of EGNOS. icon_biggrin.gif

 

The GPS might take us right to the real position, but the cache could still be anywhere up to thirty feet in the other direction.

 

------

An it harm none, do what ye will

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Once better accuracy is available, I think we will see a new line on the cache page

 

Difficulty

Terrain

Accuracy

 

Then planters can choose how close they place the cache to 'real' position

 

..and we expect to be using our eTrex for a long while yet.

 

Tech-no notice

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Originally posted by Kouros:

__________________________________________________

Of course, what has to be remembered are the 1500+ caches that have been placed without the benefit of EGNOS. icon_biggrin.gif

__________________________________________________

 

And some without even using a GPS

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quote:
Originally posted by Kouros:

 

The GPS might take us right to the real position, but the cache could still be anywhere up to thirty feet in the other direction.

 


 

Surely you mean 35' icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

 

_________________________________________________________

 

It is better to regret something you did, rather than to regret something you didn't do.

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quote:
Originally posted by conedxf & family:

quote:
Originally posted by Kouros:

[snip]

The GPS might take us right to the real position, but the cache could still be anywhere up to thirty feet in the other direction.

 

------

An it harm none, do what ye will


 

Or in some cases 30ft up the side of an old railway cutting icon_wink.gif I'm still finding bits of chalk in my pocket icon_redface.gif


 

Odd you should say that. I still find bits of chalk in my pocket too.

 

Good ol' Teach never did figure out it was me. icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

 

------

An it harm none, do what ye will

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Reminds me of my second-ever cache hunt, using a borrowed GPSr. The guy I was borrowing it off was with me, but he let me navigate with the buttons.

 

Clambered into a hedgerow thingie, came up against an impassable bit of it, and I declared "It's 53 feet that way!", pointing through the hedge. My companion simply said "Look at your feet, Ian".

 

Ooops. Never trust GPS inside a hedgerow thingie.

 

--

**Mother is the name of God on the lips of all children**

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When looking into this some time ago on a US site I remember reading that WAAS is not always receivable (geostationary satellite?), can make readings less accurate (depends how far you are from a reference receiver) - and means you have to have your receiver running full time to get all the data - unlike power saver mode where it goes on as little as possible.

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quote:
Originally posted by BachgenB:

When looking into this some time ago on a US site I remember reading that WAAS is not always receivable (geostationary satellite?)


Well a geostationary satellite is always in the same place in the sky. So if it is in line of site from a particular location, it will always be in line of site from that location. EGNOS is a European system and is designed to be visible throughout Europe

quote:
, can make readings less accurate (depends how far you are from a reference receiver)


Part of the point is to let you know when external conditions make your normal signal less accurate. Knowing that you don't know where you are is useful in some circumstances.

quote:
- and means you have to have your receiver running full time to get all the data - unlike power saver mode where it goes on as little as possible.

Time to buy some new rechargeables.

 

I don't think this 1 April thing is anything to get majorly excited about. They are only changing the signal format slightly. It's still a test system which means unreliable (sometimes deliberately so). Some people have claimed that they can already get the signal so the format change is also not a big deal.

 

-------

jeremyp

The second ten million caches were the worst too.

http://www.jeremyp.net/geocaching

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quote:
Originally posted by jeremyp:

I don't think this 1 April thing is anything to get majorly excited about. They are only changing the signal format slightly. It's still a test system which means unreliable (sometimes deliberately so). Some people have claimed that they can already get the signal so the format change is also not a big deal.

 

-------

jeremyp

The second ten million caches were the worst too.

http://www.jeremyp.net/geocaching

The signal carries a coding which indicates it is a test signal. Garmin receivers enabled for WAAS will therefore ignore it, so although the Satellites will be visable on the satellite view their bar will remain grey as Garmin discount the test signal. Magellan on the other hand will process the signal regardless. I am unclear reading the information on the ESA site if after the 1st April the Garmin recievers will start to accept the data. If I wasn't so lazy, I'd probably write to garmin and ask, but I'm not sure that in practical terms it will make that much difference.

 

Best wishes

 

Mark

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