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I'm American - help me understand caching in the UK


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Hi there. Welcome to the UK! Many caches are located on public land - footpaths - which cross farming land. Many ancient rights of way are maintained although they cross farming land/private property. Anyone is allowed to access this land - even if it crosses your backgarden! When you see a footpath sign (usually wooden but also yellow markers are used) then there is a public right of way in a straight line to the next marker.

 

Recently, we found a footpath which was not being maintained by the farmer and he was actually using the whole of his field for crops, rather than leaving a path through. The stile (crossing point between field boundaries) was also in disrepair. Even when the footpath is not being maintained, it is important we walk these routes - to keep them accessible to all. On that ocassion we walked the perimeter of the field (to avoid trampling crops) but another time we will walk straight across, as we are trespassing by walking the perimeter!

 

Other keen ramblers will probably have more replies!

 

Enjoy the UK and its caches.

 

Love many, trust few, learn to paddle your own Canoe.

 

We can't run away for ever ... but theres nothing wrong with getting a good head start

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quote:
Originally posted by Rockratgirl:

Many caches are located on public land - footpaths - which cross farming land.


{pedantic mode}

Actually, in England (unlike America) there is no such thing as "public land". Some may belong to a public organisation (like a county council) and as such is then governed by that organisation's rules.

 

The land of the path across a farmer's field is owned by the farmer, and that's usually why its up to HIM to maintain it... he's not supposed to plough it up (if he does he must reinstate it etc etc). Different types of paths (footpath, bridleway etc) are supposed to be certain sizes (eg bridleways so that 2 horses can pass).

 

The public have a "right of way" along these paths... a right to walk (ride a horse on a bridleway), stop & enjoy (but not for TOO long), but that's about it. Picnicing is theoretically a no-no. I suppose you'd be ok 'eating on the hoof' icon_smile.gif

 

On a "public byeway" I believe you are allowed to drive cars & bikes.

 

But you are not supposed to stray from the path, unless the path is obstructed.

 

So Hammack is actually right: in theory, some (many?) caches are placed on private land, as if they are ON the path, they shouldn't be (yo may walk, not plant caches!!!!), and if they are adjacent, then they ARE on private land. And that's still the case if its owned by the local council, and CERTAINLY the case for Forestry Commission land. (Good news: you are OK for Hampshire CC, they have recently said caching is ok on their land, as long as certain provisos are adhered to). In reality, many places that we would leave caches are fairly minimally maintained by the owners, and so may even never be seen by the owners... doesn't make them any more legal though!!!!

 

Of course, there are also other paths which are *not* legally deemed to be publically accessible (on an OS Map the "rights of way" are in red, others are in black)

quote:

When you see a footpath sign (usually wooden but also yellow markers are used) then there is a public right of way in a straight line to the next marker.


I would never assume without looking at the map... even one that says "PUBLIC footpath" may not actually be a right of way (but probably is in most cases). Some places are using different colurs for footpaths / bridleways / byeways, or for different routes.

quote:

Recently, we found a footpath which was not being maintained by the farmer and he was actually using the whole of his field for crops, rather than leaving a path through. The stile (crossing point between field boundaries) was also in disrepair.


Yes, the owner IS supposed to maintain the stiles etc. Was the field fresh-ploughed?... I think they get a couple of weeks to reinstate.

 

We went across a recently-ploughed field last week, and there was a nice (muddy!!) grass path still across it! They are obviously better behaved around here :-)

quote:
Even when the footpath is not being maintained, it is important we walk these routes - to keep them accessible to all. On that ocassion we walked the perimeter of the field (to avoid trampling crops) but another time we will walk straight across, as we are trespassing by walking the perimeter!

 

I'll leave all of that *serious* walking to you!!! We'll stay with caching for now!

quote:
Enjoy the UK and its caches.

From what I hear, the style / placement of many of our caches is different to the US... but I guess that's part simply because of our more-densely populated land. I'm sure Hammack will enjoy them all!!!

 

Suppose I'd better do a

{/pedantic mode}

to keep the syntax right! icon_smile.gif

 

Paul

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OK.. Without being flipant.

 

Team Blitz is correct in saying all land is owned by some one. The info below is the Law concerning footpaths etc.

 

Footpath is for walkers only

Bridle Wayis for walkers cyclists and a horse can be rode or lead. No other vehiclse allowed

Byway allow the use of wheeled vehicles of all kinds

Restricted Byway basically any mode of transport not mechanically driven

 

Then there is Permissive path, allowed by a land owner but not a right of way.

 

Width of rights of way

 

1. for a footpath, the width is 1m across open fields and where it goes around the edge of a field 1.5m

2. for a bridleway, the width is 2m across open fields and where it goes around the edge of a field 3m

3. for all other rights of way , the width is 3m across open fields and where it goes around the edge of a field 5m

 

If a farmer disturbs a right of way then it must be reinstated within 14 days.. Subsiquent disturbance must be sorted within 24 hours.

 

This is the Law of the Land.. It is up to the cacher how he utilises this information.

 

Moss the Boss... Sorta

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quote:
Originally posted by Rockratgirl:

Recently, we found a footpath which was not being maintained by the farmer and he was actually using the whole of his field for crops, rather than leaving a path through. The stile (crossing point between field boundaries) was also in disrepair. Even when the footpath is not being maintained, it is important we walk these routes - to keep them accessible to all. On that ocassion we walked the perimeter of the field (to avoid trampling crops) but another time we will walk straight across, as we are trespassing by walking the perimeter!


 

Interesting.

 

A few weeks ago, I came across a footpath that had a painted sign hung over the stile saying "Footpath Closed" - at the time, I did what you did, and walked it anyway, as it wasn't currently being ploughed.

 

I must check to see if it was a public footpath, or a Permissive Path, though. I'll feel guilty if it's a PP, to be fair, but I remember being a little put out, at the time, as the sign was up halfway down a path, rather than at the start of it.

 

------

An it harm none, do what ye will

soapbox.gif

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Thanks for all the info. Cache placements in the US are almost entirely on obviously public land (state parks, county parks, state nature preserves, etc.) and the land is clearly understood to be publicly accessible.

 

If I was a timid cacher, I would not have attempted so many caches in the UK that were in farmers' fields. But I just thought up a story in case someone came out of the farmhouse and yelled at me: "I am a photographer from America, just taking some photos of the English countryside. Sorry, didn't know this was your field. I'll be leaving now." Never had to use that line thankfully.

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quote:
Originally posted by Kouros:A few weeks ago, I came across a footpath that had a painted sign hung over the stile saying "Footpath Closed" - at the time, I did what you did, and walked it anyway, as it wasn't currently being ploughed.

Notices calculated to deter you from using a public right of way are, unsurprisingly, illegal! I'm not sure about PPs. Can they be closed at the landowner's whim? (ie does PP status protect walkers from paths being closed, or protect landowners from their path being decalared public, or a bit of both?)

 

You are also within your right to remove (or circumnavigate through private land) any obstructions which have been placed over a footpath. But only if you are a bone fide traveller on that path. (You're not allowed to walk the path for the sole purpose of removing the obstruction).

 

So, when I tried to do Forgotten Souls II and found that the owners of the yard had barricaded up the gate to the footpath, I was quite within my rights to climb over their side fence and remove their barracades (and did so!). However, I could not return every weekend with the sole purpose of reopening the public footpath!

 

GeocacheUK - resources for the UK Geocaching community.

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To Team Blitz -

 

I am NOT a serious walker - I am a mother & dog owner who is enjoying caching as a way to (try to!) keep fit. I merely posted my thoughts in reply to Hammack. I feel that I should have kept quiet as I was so "far off the mark" with my comments.

 

I am aware of Rambling Associations in the UK who try to keep these "public rights of way" open by their walking over them, and I am a firm believer in keeping up this good work.

 

I will be more cautious in bothering to reply to a post if I will be criticised so much. I had been so pleased to discover a UK forum ... perhaps it was a little presumptious of me to post my own comments though - I should leave it to "administrators" and the like.

 

Love many, trust few, learn to paddle your own Canoe.

 

We can't run away for ever ... but theres nothing wrong with getting a good head start

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Dear Rockrat girl,

I'm just a Lurker reading this thread, I have never met Team Blitz, but reading the post I didn't think there was any implied criticism of you at all.. icon_confused.gif I read a bit of humour and a desire to help.

icon_smile.gif

Relax, we are all cachers in search of something...usually a lunch box.

 

Cache the Bug-Geocaching

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I replied to the original post, trying to assist with the walking knowledge I have - however limited - but from a UK perspective.

 

If you read the replies, they are to me - pedantically picking fault with my comments! I have obviously stepped on people's toes by trying to post and didn't realise there was a "hierachy" in posting. What are the unwritten rules here?

 

How were the replies helpful to the original poster? Poor Hammack - still want to Cache here mate?!

 

~ Plastic to the People ~

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quote:
Originally posted by Rockratgirl:

I replied to the original post, trying to assist with the walking knowledge I have - however limited - but from a UK perspective.


I'm sure you did assist. It was a good post.

 

quote:
If you read the replies, they are to me - pedantically picking fault with my comments!

I did read the replies. Pedantic, yes. Critical, no.

 

quote:
I have obviously stepped on people's toes by trying to post and didn't realise there was a "hierachy" in posting. What are the unwritten rules here?

You haven't stepped on any toes. There's no hierarchy. icon_smile.gif

 

quote:
How were the replies helpful to the original poster?

The original poster wanted clarification on public access to private land in the UK. That's what all the replies have discussed.

 

Sorry, I just don't understand why you think you're being criticised. You made a good, interesting post - people picked up on some of your points and expanded on/disagreed with them. I don't think any malice was intended!

 

What's your favourite thing?

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quote:
Originally posted by Teasel:

quote:
Originally posted by Kouros:A few weeks ago, I came across a footpath that had a painted sign hung over the stile saying "Footpath Closed" - at the time, I did what you did, and walked it anyway, as it wasn't currently being ploughed.

Notices calculated to deter you from using a public right of way are, unsurprisingly, illegal! I'm not sure about PPs. Can they be closed at the landowner's whim? (ie does PP status protect walkers from paths being closed, or protect landowners from their path being decalared public, or a bit of both?)


 

I thought the sign was illegal (which is why I did what RockRatgirl did, and walked it anyway).

 

I must admit I am also intrigued as to whether PP's are able to be closed as and when the land owner chooses.

 

I can't see the benefit of allowing walkers to traipse across your land if the farmer gets no reward. Do land owners who choose to open up a PP get any form of payment from the council?

 

Oh, and RockRatGirl (if you're still reading this) if it was in part my comment that you are reffering to as critical, it wasn't intended that way, but rather as a statement of agreement - I too had been in the same situation, which is why I found it "interesting".

 

------

An it harm none, do what ye will

soapbox.gif

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Great replies! There is a cache in West Yorkshire where a farmer yells at Geocacher's for parking their cars on his road. Its not a private road, he just don't like it! icon_wink.gif

 

Oh and for the record, I don't have a problem with anyone who has a constructive reply. I suspect team Rockratgirl has upset people via other posts and is attracting too much attention to the rodents within! icon_wink.gif

 

Glad to see you're not deterred Hammack - you've visited a cache this weekend which is on my watch list. icon_biggrin.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by Rockratgirl:

Great replies! There is a cache in West Yorkshire where a farmer yells at Geocacher's for parking their cars on his road. Its not a private road, he just don't like it! icon_wink.gif


 

You're not me, by any chance are you? icon_biggrin.gif These parallels are getting uncanny.

 

My dad was walking down a road a few months back (I say road, but it was a private road, with houses down the side that led to a farm. It was also a Public Right of Way (a footpath) that was signed as such from all entrances.

 

The occupant of one of the houses came out and shouted at him for "having the gall to walk down here."

 

Obviously, my dad was somewhat surprised, and tired to explain it was a public right of way. It took a short walk to the signpost (about a hundred foot away) to convince the occupant otherwise.

 

We think he might have only just moved in, and had been wrongly informed of the rights of way down the road.

 

------

An it harm none, do what ye will

soapbox.gif

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And in Scotland, you can throw all that stuff away. There are no public rights of way and no law of trespass, as you know it in England. The devolved Government of Scotland is also in the process of passing a law of “right to roam” in the countryside.

It’s common courtesy, however, to obey legitimate requests by the landowner to keep off particular areas of land. If it comes to the crunch though, the landowner has to prove in a court of law that a trespasser is damaging their legitimate interests, which tends to eliminate petty jobsworth restrictions.

This makes for a generally free and easy attitude to access provided that you do not do obviously stupid things like trample farmland, leave your dogs off the leash on sheep moors, or invade grouse shooting or deer stalking land in season (but it’s up to the landowner to inform you of this).

To the best of my limited knowledge, there have been no incidents between Scottish landowners and the (admittedly small) Geocaching community.

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quote:
Originally posted by Pooter:

And in Scotland, you can throw all that stuff away. There are no public rights of way and no law of trespass, as you know it in England. The devolved Government of Scotland is also in the process of passing a law of “right to roam” in the countryside.


 

What a good idea!

 

D'ya think anywhere in these fair lands will take note of that success? I would hold my breath, but I'm rather partial to staying alive.

 

------

An it harm none, do what ye will

soapbox.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by Rockratgirl:

I replied to the original post, trying to assist with the walking knowledge I have - however limited - but from a UK perspective.

 

If you read the replies, they are to me - pedantically picking fault with my comments! I have obviously stepped on people's toes by trying to post and didn't realise there was a "hierachy" in posting. What are the unwritten rules here?

 

How were the replies helpful to the original poster? Poor Hammack - still want to Cache here mate?!

 

~ Plastic to the People ~


 

Your post contained some factual inaccuracies. The bit about footpaths being public land was wrong and so was the straight line bit. People aren't going to avoid posting corrections just because it might hurt your feelings.

 

-------

jeremyp

The second ten million caches were the worst too.

http://www.jeremyp.net/geocaching

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quote:
Originally posted by Pooter:

And in Scotland, you can throw all that stuff away. There are no public rights of way and no law of trespass, as you know it in England. The devolved Government of Scotland is also in the process of passing a law of “right to roam” in the countryside.


OK, hands up anyone else who's jealous! Best scenery in the UK and the most freely accessible. What's your assylum policy like? Any chance of allowing in a couple of refugees from England?

 

GeocacheUK - resources for the UK Geocaching community.

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quote:
Originally posted by Pooter:

And in Scotland, you can throw all that stuff away. There are no public rights of way and no law of trespass, as you know it in England. The devolved Government of Scotland is also in the process of passing a law of “right to roam” in the countryside.

<snip>


 

What a wonderful sense of freedom you are entitled to. If it wern't so bloomin' cold and I didn't have such a nice job down here, I'd move to Scotland! But then, being English through and through, would I be welcome? icon_biggrin.gificon_wink.gif

 

Clamo, clamatis, omnes clamamus pro glace lactis.

 

GC:UK

GAGB

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quote:
Originally posted by Omally:

quote:
Originally posted by Pooter:

And in Scotland, you can throw all that stuff away. There are no public rights of way and no law of trespass, as you know it in England. The devolved Government of Scotland is also in the process of passing a law of “right to roam” in the countryside.

<snip>


 

What a wonderful sense of freedom you are entitled to. If it wern't so bloomin' cold and I didn't have such a nice job down here, I'd move to Scotland! But then, being English through and through, would I be welcome? icon_biggrin.gificon_wink.gif

 

Clamo, clamatis, omnes clamamus pro glace lactis.

 

http://www.geocacheuk.com/

http://www.gagb.org.uk/

 

Does a right to roam imply a right to litter other people's land with plastic boxes?

 

-------

jeremyp

The second ten million caches were the worst too.

http://www.jeremyp.net/geocaching

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quote:
Originally posted by Omally:

quote:
Originally posted by Pooter:

And in Scotland, you can throw all that stuff away. There are no public rights of way and no law of trespass, as you know it in England. The devolved Government of Scotland is also in the process of passing a law of “right to roam” in the countryside.

<snip>


 

What a wonderful sense of freedom you are entitled to. If it wern't so bloomin' cold and I didn't have such a nice job down here, I'd move to Scotland! But then, being English through and through, would I be welcome? icon_biggrin.gificon_wink.gif

 

Clamo, clamatis, omnes clamamus pro glace lactis.

 

http://www.geocacheuk.com/

http://www.gagb.org.uk/

We are to get a similar right to roam in England as well. When they sort it out.

 

Statistics show that those with the most birthdays live longest.

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quote:
Originally posted by hammack:

Maybe I still don't understand. I decided to place a cache in a field in/near/next to a WWII bunker. See the logs at the following http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?ID=68985&Nocache=0.7055475

 

How do I know if this is public or private? I wonder if I should move the cache.


 

Given the latest log for the cache:

 

"....We were told off by the landowner for not seeking his permission for being on his land especially with a growing crop. How you are expected to get his permission where no information signs exist - we're not sure? This could be a problem for future geocachers"

 

Can I suggest that the cache be temporarily archived straight away, and that it then be moved.

 

Where to? To be honest, your easiest option might be to contact a local cacher and take advanatge of their local knowledge.

 

Anyone able to help this gent?

 

Paul

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I think that all of you should consider 'emigrating' to Scotland. Gorgeous scenery (as someone said), all accessible, and above all, easy to get to. Within an hour or less from most large cities you can be in the depths of the Scottish countryside. There is a very noticeable difference in the density of people, cars and houses up here. And the English are welcome, don't let the image of a cursing Jock put you off. As for the weather, many bright clear sunny days can be had, especially on the East side of the country, and the sky is a lot bluer the further North you travel. Any takers?

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I speak as a Southerner who spent a week in Dornoch last year.

 

quote:
Originally posted by Firth of Forth:

 

Gorgeous scenery (as someone said)


Agreed. The Glenmorangie distillery was a sight for sore eyes (hic).

quote:

, all accessible, and above all, easy to get to. Within an hour or less from most large cities you can be in the depths of the Scottish countryside.


But there are very few proper roads and most of the scenic ones are clogged with tourists (like me).

quote:

And the English are welcome, don't let the image of a cursing Jock put you off.


Strange but true.

quote:

As for the weather, many bright clear sunny days can be had, especially on the East side of the country, and the sky is a lot bluer the further North you travel.


Ha, ha, ha! As far as I could see it was the same as England but colder. You do get more daylight hours in Summer though.

 

-------

jeremyp

The second ten million caches were the worst too.

http://www.gagb.org.uk

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Farmers not maintaining public footpaths in the UK are breaking the Law, they are alloud to reroute the path however around there field.

Which can add miles the ones journey.

 

I came across a field planted with Rye Seed Rape, the path was planted accross. So I took my bearings and plowed through the Crop, Believe it or not your R within your rights to do that.

 

It is important that the public footpaths R used, as farmers can after 10 years legaly claim the pather for there own.

 

Just thaught this little story might ammuse.

 

GEOC.gif | tbrace.jpg

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Yea, but how do I know if there is a public footpath on his property? There is a WWII bunker there, so I assumed that there was some sort of public access to the bunker.

 

quote:
Originally posted by The Targett Family:

Farmers not maintaining public footpaths in the UK are breaking the Law, they are alloud to reroute the path however around there field.

Which can add miles the ones journey.

 

I came across a field planted with Rye Seed Rape, the path was planted accross. So I took my bearings and plowed through the Crop, Believe it or not your R within your rights to do that.

 

It is important that the public footpaths R used, as farmers can after 10 years legaly claim the pather for there own.

 

Just thaught this little story might ammuse.

 

http://www.kenandliz.worldonline.co.uk/webimages/geoc/GEOC.gif | http://www.kenandliz.worldonline.co.uk/tbrace.jpg


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quote:
Originally posted by hammack:

Yea, but how do I know if there is a public footpath on his property? There is a WWII bunker there, so I assumed that there was some sort of public access to the bunker.


A public footpath is shown on an OS map as a broken red line. That only means you are allowed to walk on it though. It's still private land and you still need permission to place a cache on it.

I'm not sure where your cache is, the coordinates seem off a bit, but if it's on the airfield at Gorse farm then a footpath goes straight across the airfield.

But that still only means you can walk on that path.

Here's a map

Hope that helps

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quote:
Originally posted by The Hungry Caterpillars:

It strikes me after reading this forum that we could perhaps do with sound advice perhaps from somebody in the geocaching community who has experience in this area. icon_confused.gif


 

Sounds like what we need is some sort of "National Geocaching Organisation" who can build up a useful "library" of useful information & experience!

 

<grins, ducks, and runs fast.....>

 

Paul

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quote:
Originally posted by Team Blitz:

Sounds like what we need is some sort of "National Geocaching Organisation" who can build up a useful "library" of useful information & experience!

 

<grins, ducks, and runs fast.....>

 

Paul


I'm being good, don't get me started icon_biggrin.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by hammack:

There is a WWII bunker there, so I assumed that there was some sort of public access to the bunker.

 


 

There is no right of access to privately owned buildings, even if they are of historic interest.

 

I would think that even if there was a footpath close by then that wouldn't automatically mean you had access to the bunker either. For example, the fact that a public footpath goes through a farmyard doesn't give you the right to wander around inside the farm buildings.

 

With reference to a national organisation making a difference, in this case I don't think it is relevant. It seems like the cache has been placed on private property without permission, and from the reaction of the landowner he is not keen to have people there, so the cache should be removed.

 

Richard

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I'm not a lawyer, but I think the following is reasonably correct in England and Wales. If someone knows better, please let me know the error of my ways!

 

Areas where you have a legal right to place a cache:

None that I'm aware of.

 

Areas where you might argue a legal right to place a cache:

Land which you own. Note that placing a cache on your land may be deemed by the authorities to be providing a venue for a sporting activity. Unless you have the requisite facilities (toilets, public indemnity insurance etc) you may fall foul of the law. A number of farmers who used to grant permission to allow hang gliders to launch from their land are no longer allowed to, for this reason.

 

Areas where you're probably OK placing caches:

Land owned by people who are happy for caches to be placed there, and whose neighbours are also happy for caching to occur on their doorstep. (It was the farmers' neighbours who persuaded the authorities that they were effectively providing a sporting venue).

 

The discussion above about public footpaths is important for people looking for caches, but has no relevance to where you are allowed to place a cache. Just because you have a legal right to walk to a place, it does not follow that you're allowed to place a cache!

 

GeocacheUK - resources for the UK Geocaching community.

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You mean a park owned by the local council which they grant the public permission to enter at certain times? icon_wink.gif AFAIK, public parks are private areas whose owners have granted the public permission to enter them at certain times.

 

That's not to say that a park is not a good place to hide a cache! You're certainly less likely to get shouted at by the owners! Just don't be under the impression that you have a legal right even to enter the park, let alone place a cache there. (Unless there's a public footpath through it, in which case there's a 5m corridor you're allowed to walk down, so long as you don't deviate from it, and you obey all the by-laws while you're there!)

 

Oh to live in a country with more liberal access laws! icon_rolleyes.gif

 

GeocacheUK - resources for the UK Geocaching community.

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So here we are some 40 odd postings on this thread and still I suspect some of the so called facts are incorrect.Also what about SSI,s rups,sights of archeological interest and the rest.Also I think that the right to roam in England will not give the same rights that are enjoyed in Scotland.So we do not need a central organisation of some type?I am sure we do. icon_smile.gificon_smile.gificon_biggrin.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by Teasel:

You mean a park owned by the local council which they grant the public permission to enter at certain times? icon_wink.gif AFAIK, public parks are private areas whose owners have granted the public permission to enter them at certain times.

 

That's not to say that a park is not a good place to hide a cache! You're certainly less likely to get shouted at by the owners! Just don't be under the impression that you have a legal right even to enter the park, let alone place a cache there. (Unless there's a public footpath through it, in which case there's a 5m corridor you're allowed to walk down, so long as you don't deviate from it, and you obey all the by-laws while you're there!)

 

Oh to live in a country with more liberal access laws! icon_rolleyes.gif

 

http://www.geocacheuk.com - resources for the UK Geocaching community.


 

OK. You forced it out of me. It's moving to Sutton Park in Sutton-Coldfield. There are walking paths all over that place so it seems like this placement would be OK. Anyone familiar with the park to make a definitive statement?

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To get a definitive reply you will have to negotiate with the owners of the park whoever they may be (perhaps the local council).There may be a number of reasons that will prevent you some of which could be found in the local by-laws which can differ from place to place.I am sorry that you are having so many problems placing a cache but in this country the geocaching community is in its infancy .Sooner or later it will get its act together and hopefully provide people like yourselves with properly informed advice. icon_frown.gif.Finally do enjoy your time here and mayyour cache hunting be succesful icon_smile.gificon_smile.gificon_smile.gif

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quote:

 

Anyone able to help this gent?

 

Paul


 

I might be able to. I was the first to visit that cache. I don't know the area intimately, but I do live fairly nearby. I could have a search perhaps. Hammack, have you returned to the US now?

 

The Devil may care, but I don't mind.

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quote:
Originally posted by Chris and Mary B:

quote:

 

Anyone able to help this gent?

 

Paul


 

I might be able to. I was the first to visit that cache. I don't know the area intimately, but I do live fairly nearby. I could have a search perhaps. Hammack, have you returned to the US now?

 

The Devil may care, but I don't mind.


 

I am in the US now but am coming back to the UK in June I think.

 

I like the idea of featuring a WWII bunker but I guess the cache should get archived and the container and its contents reused for a different cache with a different name.

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