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DNF when not arriving at GZ?


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I went on a hike yesterday specifically to find one certain cache. I got sick along the way and didn't manage to hike the last 2km with another 300m of elevation over just 1km. I have to make up my own mind of this, but what would you log? Nothing, as you never made it to the cache? A note to at least have this as part of your caching history? A DNF as you specifically hiked 1000m up in 30C heat for this one cache? A found just because you deserve it? I'm tempted to go for the DNF here, but am curious how you would chose.

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5 minutes ago, terratin said:

I'm tempted to go for the DNF here, but am curious how you would chose

 You were on your way to the cache but you didn't search for it, so, for me, that's not a DNF.  If I am at GZ and cannot find the cache, that's a DNF.

 

What you are saying is, I have left the house, I was willing to get to the cache but than I decided otherwise, therefore I log a DNF.  That's not what I would log.

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17 minutes ago, Mausebiber said:

You were on your way to the cache but you didn't search for it, so, for me, that's not a DNF.  If I am at GZ and cannot find the cache, that's a DNF.

This is my opinion also.

28 minutes ago, terratin said:

I got sick along the way and didn't manage to hike the last 2km with another 300m of elevation over just 1km

I'm sorry you got sick and didn't make it to the cache. 

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30 minutes ago, Max and 99 said:

This is my opinion also.

I'm sorry you got sick and didn't make it to the cache. 

 Nothing bad. Just a combination of strenuous hike, high temperatures and ice-cold spring water I guess. My belly complained. A lot. :antenna: It was still a fab hike, and on the way down again I collected waypoints for a new EarthCache.

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At first glance I also would have said that a DNF log is the wrong type of log but reconsidering the situation I would say it may depend of the situation.

The number of DNF logs when the cache is in place (!) may be used as an indicator - both for other searchers but for the owner as well - for its difficulty. Difficulty meaning both ratings here. So if you say that the sickness came from the hard hike you might say this is an indicator that the cache is not very easy too reach. So maybe a DNF might be not completely incorrect here telling others about the terrain difficultys here (not the D rating, of course, as you did not reach GZ).

 

In fact I - personally - would still use "write note" but notes tend to be noted (sic!) less than DNFs.

 

Jochen

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54 minutes ago, frostengel said:

At first glance I also would have said that a DNF log is the wrong type of log but reconsidering the situation I would say it may depend of the situation.

The number of DNF logs when the cache is in place (!) may be used as an indicator - both for other searchers but for the owner as well - for its difficulty. Difficulty meaning both ratings here. So if you say that the sickness came from the hard hike you might say this is an indicator that the cache is not very easy too reach. So maybe a DNF might be not completely incorrect here telling others about the terrain difficultys here (not the D rating, of course, as you did not reach GZ).

 

In fact I - personally - would still use "write note" but notes tend to be noted (sic!) less than DNFs.

 

Jochen

 

Well, it was a T4.5 for the tough hike, and D3 for hidden underneath a random rock among a field of rocks. But I never got to the end. I think overall people are a bit too scared to write DNFs, also in relation with the cache score and reviewers 'lurking'. But that's beside the point for this cache.

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4 minutes ago, terratin said:

Well, it was a T4.5 for the tough hike, and D3 for hidden underneath a random rock among a field of rocks. But I never got to the end. I think overall people are a bit too scared to write DNFs, also in relation with the cache score and reviewers 'lurking'. But that's beside the point for this cache.

 

The rule of thumb I generally use is if I was defeated by the cache or its environment I log a DNF, but if it was something unrelated to the cache that interrupted my search (say a phone call telling me I was needed elsewhere) it's a WN (or nothing if there's no story to tell). In such a situation, if my sickness was brought about by something I ate for lunch, definitely a WN, but if, as in your case, the sickness can be attributed to the cache's tough terrain and the heat (a part of the cache's environment), I'd be leaning towards a DNF.

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For me, DNF means I reached GZ and searched, but did not find the cache. If I don't reach GZ, or if I reach GZ but don't search for some reason, then it's a DNS (Did Not Search), logged as a Note.

 

But for others, the search starts when they're still on their way to GZ, so there you go...

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For me, definitely a Write Note log type. I use a DNF log when I've actually arrived at GZ, searched for whatever length of time and was unable to locate the cache. The Write Note is telling of my adventure so far. If I arrive at GZ, but don't search, (perhaps muggles are sitting near where I think I want to search), I would still log a write Note log type explaining the situation.

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5 minutes ago, niraD said:

For me, DNF means I reached GZ and searched, but did not find the cache. If I don't reach GZ, or if I reach GZ but don't search for some reason, then it's a DNS (Did Not Search), logged as a Note.

 

But for others, the search starts when they're still on their way to GZ, so there you go...

 

To me, that trivialises the task of getting to GZ relative to the task of searching once there. I've done caches where all of the challenge the CO had set was in getting to GZ, as the cache was in plain sight or they provided a spoiler photo showing exactly where it was hidden. On a T1.5, yes sure, all the effort is in the search, but on a T4.5 it's getting there that's the challenge and failing that challenge ought to be worth a DNF.

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1 minute ago, barefootjeff said:

but on a T4.5 it's getting there that's the challenge and failing that challenge ought to be worth a DNF.

Sorry BFJ, don't agree with that one. I believe a DNF log is all about the actual search for the cache, not the journey to get there.

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In that specific case of the OP I most probably would write a Note but it could also be a DNF especially if this cache was the only target on my hike.

36 minutes ago, Calypso62 said:

I believe a DNF log is all about the actual search for the cache, not the journey to get there.

To those who repeatatly state that without reaching GZ they never write a DNF:

Do you only have Traditionals in mind or is this equaly valid for you when you fail finding a stage along a Multi? In that case I definitely will write a DNF.

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I would log a note here, because my personal definition of a DNF requires that I actively searched for the cache at ground zero.  (See the bookmark list linked in my tagline below my forum post.) Turning back on a hike because I wasn't feeling well, or turning back on a bike trail because I got a flat tire, or getting right back in the car at an urban cache because ground zero was infested with muggles are all equivalent examples where a note is more appropriate than a DNF.

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18 minutes ago, The Leprechauns said:

I would log a note here, because my personal definition of a DNF requires that I actively searched for the cache at ground zero.  (See the bookmark list linked in my tagline below my forum post.) Turning back on a hike because I wasn't feeling well, or turning back on a bike trail because I got a flat tire, or getting right back in the car at an urban cache because ground zero was infested with muggles are all equivalent examples where a note is more appropriate than a DNF.

 

I agree with this 100%.

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5 hours ago, terratin said:

I went on a hike yesterday specifically to find one certain cache. I got sick along the way and didn't manage to hike the last 2km with another 300m of elevation over just 1km. I have to make up my own mind of this, but what would you log? Nothing, as you never made it to the cache? A note to at least have this as part of your caching history? A DNF as you specifically hiked 1000m up in 30C heat for this one cache? A found just because you deserve it? I'm tempted to go for the DNF here, but am curious how you would chose.

 

There are tons of threads about what log is best for a cache you were hiking to but were prevented from getting there.  If there's, for example, a chemical leak making cachers sick, and probably many cachers then couldn't make it to the cache site, yet they post no particular log about that, I might make a DNF log.  Same if the ground has washed away and I couldn't get to the cache to even look for it.  Cachers were intent to get there, but never warned anyone because "they didn't search".  Future cachers will also go expecting to find it and never reach the point of starting a search.  That situation would be rare, but I'd be logging a DNF.  Sue me.  B)

 

If it was simply a much more strenuous hike than you expected, that's more of a gray area.  Use our own judgement, make logs as consistent as you can.  You will be the person who gets the most value from your logs, make them useful to you. At least a note about the reality vs. the expectation would be good.

 

But I have a Bookmark "List" named "Go Find".  If I decide to make a Note log or none at all, I may add it to the List, for ease of findng the cache page later.

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At times my "Write Note" has contained

 

a.  CNL >>> Could Not Look.

 

d. DNL >>> Did Not Look.

 

The CNL / DNL options are added when things get tooooooo dicey for this old geezer.

 

"Rolled up on a few caches" where critters made searching too dangerous; or situations where terrain is outside of my comfort zone.

 

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8 hours ago, terratin said:

I'm tempted to go for the DNF here, but am curious how you would chose.

 

I would log DNF if I want to see that status on my map. In your case, the DNF status may not be what you want. When browsing the map, it is easier to avoid a cache you have already tried to find when there is a sorrow blue face on it. You may not want to avoid this cache in the future.

Edited by arisoft
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I'd log a DNF if the turning back before getting to GZ  was for a  condition that would impact all searchers.

I recently logged a DNF on a highway rest stop cache, because the rest stop is closed for construction until October 2022.    If I had  not stopped because of auto accident, I'd Write Note, or no log.

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Again from Groundspeak:

Use a “Didn’t Find It” (DNF) log when you look for a cache but do not find it. DNF logs are an important log type — they inform cache owners and other finders that a cache may be extra difficult to find or possibly missing. DNF stands for “Did not find”.

 

For me this is clear, you have to look for the cache(container) and if you cannot find it, you log a DNF. 

NOT: - they inform cache owners and other finders that a cache may be extra difficult to reach

 

But quite honestly, does it really matter?  If anyone wants to log a DNF that's fine also, with a couple of words to the CO why you logged a DNF.

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10 hours ago, terratin said:

I went on a hike yesterday specifically to find one certain cache. I got sick along the way and didn't manage to hike the last 2km with another 300m of elevation over just 1km. I have to make up my own mind of this, but what would you log?

 

I'd leave a write note.  A DNF is when you look for a cache but do not find it, and says so in the Help Center.   :)

 If I wasn't there to look for it, a Did Not Find  wouldn't make sense. 

I've written some very good write notes of the journey or situations, that probably wouldn't have been as nice, simply saying I couldn't find a container...

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Because the cache includes a terrain rating, which is based on "the hike" to GZ, looking for the cache could be considered to start at the trailhead. Interesting, GS used the word "look", not the word "search", in their reason to log a DNF. While they might be synonymous, their definitions are not identical. Based on one definition of look, "To cast one's gaze on a person, or in a direction", it can be argued that just viewing a cache listing and declining to take any further action would warrant a DNF. As the OP stated, they have to make the decision on how to log this, assuming that they do log it at all. It really boils down to one's personal definition for "look for a cache".

 

To answer the OP question, I would do a Write Note. My personal definition of "look for a cache" requires that I at least arrive at GZ.

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8 hours ago, arisoft said:

 

I would log DNF if I want to see that status on my map. In your case, the DNF status may not be what you want. When browsing the map, it is easier to avoid a cache you have already tried to find when there is a sorrow blue face on it. You may not want to avoid this cache in the future.

 

That blue frowny face on the map is part of the reason I prefer to log DNFs on caches where the terrain has defeated me, as they serve as a reminder that I need to go back better prepared for another attempt. Here's an example:

 

image.png.e7c60c77dfb489ca90213868fd0a7526.png

 

If I'd just logged a WN on my first attempt, I'd have probably either completely forgotten about that cache and not gone back or, after seeing it as unfound on the map, eventually gone back and, not remembering I'd been there before, got stuck at the same place again with no rope in my backpack.

 

My DNF logs are an important part of my caching history as they're a record of my unsuccessful attempts at finding caches. WNs don't cut it as they're mostly about stuff unrelated to a cache search, like the examples the Help Centre gives for that log type:

 

Quote

Use a “Write note” log to add information to a cache. Some examples:

  • You previously logged and found the cache, but want to add additional information.
    “Revisiting this cache with a friend who hasn’t found it yet!”
  • You dropped a trackable into a cache previously logged and found.
  • This cache is part of a challenge cache, but you haven’t completed all the challenge tasks yet.

 

A lot of my WNs are notes on my own caches where I want to post something but an OM log isn't appropriate, or when I've revisited previously found caches when out with a group. If I logged my unsuccessful searches where I was defeated by something other than the cache's camo as WNs, they'd be lost amongst the noise. Also, DNF logs on unfound caches show up prominently at the top of the cache page but WN logs show nothing, for example:

 

image.png.70fd6afd6cecfe802ccab7e2ddea4b4d.png

With a WN, there's no indication anywhere in the system that I've ever attempted the cache.

Edited by barefootjeff
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9 hours ago, kunarion said:

if the ground has washed away and I couldn't get to the cache to even look for it

It might depend on the particular circumstances, but I'm pretty sure that warrants a NM right there.

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45 minutes ago, fendmar said:

It might depend on the particular circumstances, but I'm pretty sure that warrants a NM right there.


”NM, half the mountain cleaved away, please put that back, I need that cache for my county grid!”
 

Yes, I always run out and repair the crevasse or the poison gas in my example.  But a lot of Cache Owners don’t perform that important maintenance. :anicute:

Edited by kunarion
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23 minutes ago, kunarion said:


”NM, half the mountain cleaved away, please put that back, I need that cache for my county grid!”
 

Yes, I always run out and repair the crevasse or the poison gas in my example.  But a lot of Cache Owners don’t perform that important maintenance. :anicute:

Since the owner's crevasse may have washed away in your example, yep, NM.

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I’ve done at least one DNF on a cache a lot like the OP’s story.  Last year, I stepped into a forested area and was immediately stung by a huge wasp, as others swarmed.  It was just pure luck that I wasn’t stung by a bunch of them.  The cache should be right there, but I didn’t do any searching for it at all for some reason.  “DNF”.  
 

I’ve previously admitted that while on a cache hunt, I might just log Did Not Find if I did not find, regardless of whether or not I put any work into the actual search for it.  Especially if prevented by a serious issue that there was no warning about, that cancelled the hunt.  So, yeah, I singlehandedly caused the whole CHS thing.  It’s all my fault that COs routinely ignore issues on a cache, after logs like the one I posted.  And not at all because of the fake finds that ensue, finds that they Did Not Find.

 

But in the wasp case, I didn’t instead make an NM, because when I go to experience the glory of the natural world, that includes getting viciously bitten by the glory of the natural world.  You can’t require a CO to go fix that.

 

Edited by kunarion
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On 7/30/2021 at 2:08 PM, niraD said:

For me, DNF means I reached GZ and searched, but did not find the cache. If I don't reach GZ, or if I reach GZ but don't search for some reason, then it's a DNS (Did Not Search), logged as a Note.

Absolutely. I would log DNS or DNR (did not reach) as a Note.

 

I only log DNF if I think I have reasons to believe that the cache is gone, after searching thoroughly.

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37 minutes ago, Ragnemalm said:

I only log DNF if I think I have reasons to believe that the cache is gone, after searching thoroughly.

I make no claims whatsoever about whether or not the cache is gone, nor about how thoroughly I searched. For me, DNF means only that I got to GZ and searched, but did not find the cache. I have DNFed plenty of caches that were still there. My record so far is 5 DNFs on a cache that was there (before finding it on the 6th attempt).

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No wrong or right way, if you take care to do whichever correctly.

 

For me, a DNF is in order anytime I'm not able to come up with a cache. My thinking is that the search has begun if I push "go to" on my gpsr and actually take off to go find a cache. But, I also feel it's necessary to state in my DNF, the reason I posted it. For instance, I started for the cache but got sick along the way and didn't make it to ground zero to finish the job. This keeps my stats correct and at the same time, doesn't mislead a future finder.

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19 hours ago, fendmar said:

if the ground has washed away and I couldn't get to the cache to even look for it...

 

This happened to a series of my caches along a road that was hit by fire and flood. I couldn't even check to see if the caches were still there until the road was reopened. I would think a NM or WN is appropriate to let the CO know there is a problem with the cache location. A DNF without reaching GZ and actually searching for the cache doesn't feel right to me.

I Disabled the series until the road was fixed and I could check on their condition. Turns out three were fine and one got archived. But it took quite awhile and the Reviewer was patient. Having pics helped.

 

480147f6-2835-48f2-821b-e84f9f514a6a.jpg

 

04584ecc-c546-434e-a4b7-58ee6de3b054.jpg

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1 hour ago, Mudfrog said:

No wrong or right way, if you take care to do whichever correctly.

 

For me, a DNF is in order anytime I'm not able to come up with a cache. My thinking is that the search has begun if I push "go to" on my gpsr and actually take off to go find a cache. But, I also feel it's necessary to state in my DNF, the reason I posted it. For instance, I started for the cache but got sick along the way and didn't make it to ground zero to finish the job. This keeps my stats correct and at the same time, doesn't mislead a future finder.


Communication is key.

 

I hope my DNF log doesn’t convey that the cache is gone, nor that I’m sure there’s a problem with it.  It’s just that I’m terrible at finding Geocaches.  Really, really bad at it.  So bad that people ask me why I even bother with this competition (or is it a hobby?).  The CHS assumes my DNF means I am somewhat competent at what I’m doing, which I am not.  I’m a Bad Cacher.

 

Edited by kunarion
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3 minutes ago, G0ldNugget said:

 

This happened to a series of my caches along a road that was hit by fire and flood. I couldn't even check to see if the caches were still there until the road was reopened. I would think a NM or WN is appropriate to let the CO know there is a problem with the cache location. A DNF without reaching GZ and actually searching for the cache doesn't feel right to me.

I Disabled the series until the road was fixed and I could check on their condition. Turns out three were fine and one got archived. But it took quite awhile and the Reviewer was patient. Having pics helped.

 

480147f6-2835-48f2-821b-e84f9f514a6a.jpg

 

04584ecc-c546-434e-a4b7-58ee6de3b054.jpg


For something like that, it’s best to have an attentive CO that alerts cachers of the problem.  It’s usually not that extreme, but I know which of my caches need special attention, and I don’t rely on cachers to go hike up there and discover they can’t access the cache.  I pre-empt the DNF, or whatever log doesn’t feel right.  Because they don’t have to make the trip to not Find it.

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On 8/1/2021 at 5:04 AM, niraD said:

I make no claims whatsoever about whether or not the cache is gone, nor about how thoroughly I searched. For me, DNF means only that I got to GZ and searched, but did not find the cache. I have DNFed plenty of caches that were still there. My record so far is 5 DNFs on a cache that was there (before finding it on the 6th attempt).

+1. Exactly the way I play it.

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On 8/1/2021 at 5:04 AM, niraD said:

I make no claims whatsoever about whether or not the cache is gone, nor about how thoroughly I searched. For me, DNF means only that I got to GZ and searched, but did not find the cache. I have DNFed plenty of caches that were still there. My record so far is 5 DNFs on a cache that was there (before finding it on the 6th attempt).

Same - in fact I'll often state 'I'm sure its there' in our DNFs..... I usually do give an indication of our degree of searching though....

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The reason for DNF log is so you know to go back and try again.  I would make it clear so the owner doesn't think its missing.  The watch list or bookmark is not user friendly.  Hit the DNF and you will see it on the map every time you are looking in that area of the map.  

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On 8/2/2021 at 9:49 AM, SwineFlew said:

The reason for DNF log is so you know to go back and try again.  I would make it clear so the owner doesn't think its missing.  The watch list or bookmark is not user friendly.  Hit the DNF and you will see it on the map every time you are looking in that area of the map.  

I disagree.  The reason for a DNF log is to show that you did not find the cache.  No more, no less.

 

If you did not get to GZ, there are other ways to remind yourself to try that cache again.  Lists, personal cache notes, special database in GSAK (or a spreadsheet if you don't use GSAK).  

 

DNF is Did Not Find, not Did Not Search.

 

When you log a Write Note the cache is still on the map, showing as not found, every time you look at that area of the map.

Edited by Gill & Tony
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7 hours ago, Gill & Tony said:

I disagree.  The reason for a DNF log is to show that you did not find the cache.  No more, no less.

 

If you did not get to GZ, there are other ways to remind yourself to try that cache again.  Lists, personal cache notes, special database in GSAK (or a spreadsheet if you don't use GSAK).  

 

DNF is Did Not Find, not Did Not Search.

 

When you log a Write Note the cache is still on the map, showing as not found, every time you look at that area of the map.

I don't think you are following.  Try geocaching in places like Hong Kong.  Its difficult to find the true ground zero.  It can be in the basement  or 6 floors up!   Sometimes the CO wants to make it challenging! The unhappy face remains me that I try finding ground zero.  The problem with your thinking, you are taking it too literally of what DNF means.  Not finding GZ is a DNF.  If you never been in Hong Kong,  you have no idea how difficult to find GZ.  In most places, GZ is ground level.  I got stories of trying to find the true GZ, it shows less than 5 feet on my GPS but I know I was at the wrong level! There was a cache that took me over a hour to get to GZ.  Why? Most walkways are on the 3rd floors and trying to find stairways to that 3rd floor can be nerve-wracking because they are behind unmarked doors!  A unfounded cache is on my map but it doesn't show if I try looking for it or not.  I like seeing the unhappy faces on my map because it reminds me of my journey of trying to get to GZ.  

 

I understand there's other ways to list it but like I said earlier, its more user-friendly to log a DNF log!   I am not going to waste my time making a bookmark list!  That's too time consuming!  I want to turn on my app and see the map and I can see where I left off. No need to fool around looking for the list and trying to get it to work! 

 

If you delete my DNF logs, I will report you to GS! Some people like to see DNF so they understand other people journey so they can make it easier for themselves of not making the same mistakes. They are almost the only thing I read on the cache page. 

 

If you are a CO that hate DNF, you are playing the wrong hobby.  DNF is very much part of our hobby.   The good CO are the one that don't complain about how other people play the hobby.  

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7 hours ago, Gill & Tony said:

I disagree.  The reason for a DNF log is to show that you did not find the cache.  No more, no less.

 

If you did not get to GZ, there are other ways to remind yourself to try that cache again.  Lists, personal cache notes, special database in GSAK (or a spreadsheet if you don't use GSAK).  

 

DNF is Did Not Find, not Did Not Search.

 

When you log a Write Note the cache is still on the map, showing as not found, every time you look at that area of the map.

To me it's a binary selection - either I Found the cache or I Did Not Find the cache.  Found meaning I can access and sign the log from the container*.  Whether I think the cache is missing or not is not part of the binary choice so has no bearing on the log type.

 

I'm started this game back before onboard road/trail maps, so getting to the cache was sometimes as much (or more) work as searching GZ.  So my mindset is the hunt/search starts with the GOTO button - anything that cause me to not find the cache means I Did Not Find the cache.

 

It's not my job/responsibility to maintain the CHS of caches I seek.  My job is to report (in as much detail I wish) my experience with said cache.  If others want to ascribe more meaning to the type of log I use, that's on them, I'm just telling my story.

 

 

 

*We had one cache recently where my wife was two inches too short to grab the cache.  We were in our inflatable kayak and standing she couldn't reach, it was windy so I couldn't try as I was holding the 'yak in position against the stump using grips that as a climber were good, but the wife wouldn't be able to use (strength and training).  Did we Find the cache?  No, no access to sign the log.  Was it missing?  Obviously not, but did we Not Find the cache?  Yep, it's a DNF.

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3 minutes ago, The Jester said:

So my mindset is the hunt/search starts with the GOTO button - anything that cause me to not find the cache means I Did Not Find the cache.

 

anything...    I'm leaving the house, press goto and oops, the cache is on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, well, not good, I log a DNF.  Oh there is another one on the ISS, well again I won't make it, another DNF.

At the end of the day I have collected 150 new DNfs, a brand new game.  Thanks Jester

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2 hours ago, Mausebiber said:

 

anything...    I'm leaving the house, press goto and oops, the cache is on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, well, not good, I log a DNF.  Oh there is another one on the ISS, well again I won't make it, another DNF.

At the end of the day I have collected 150 new DNfs, a brand new game.  Thanks Jester


That’s what I’ve seen before in similar threads, that the danger if a Did Not Find log was changed to mean “Did Not Find”, therefore every cache in the multiverse applies because they’re all DNF, at least until found.  Sure, there are ways to take logs to the extreme.  That’s a big issue with having “no rules”, it then requires common sense.

 

Edited by kunarion
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34 minutes ago, Mausebiber said:

 

anything...    I'm leaving the house, press goto and oops, the cache is on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, well, not good, I log a DNF.  Oh there is another one on the ISS, well again I won't make it, another DNF.

At the end of the day I have collected 150 new DNfs, a brand new game.  Thanks Jester

Rolling my eyes.  That isn't what he's trying to say.  You are taking his thoughts out of context to support your narrow mindset of what DNF means to you.  Nice try! 

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2 hours ago, The Jester said:

To me it's a binary selection - either I Found the cache or I Did Not Find the cache.  Found meaning I can access and sign the log from the container*.  Whether I think the cache is missing or not is not part of the binary choice so has no bearing on the log type.

 

I'm started this game back before onboard road/trail maps, so getting to the cache was sometimes as much (or more) work as searching GZ.  So my mindset is the hunt/search starts with the GOTO button - anything that cause me to not find the cache means I Did Not Find the cache.

 

It's not my job/responsibility to maintain the CHS of caches I seek.  My job is to report (in as much detail I wish) my experience with said cache.  If others want to ascribe more meaning to the type of log I use, that's on them, I'm just telling my story.

 

 

 

*We had one cache recently where my wife was two inches too short to grab the cache.  We were in our inflatable kayak and standing she couldn't reach, it was windy so I couldn't try as I was holding the 'yak in position against the stump using grips that as a climber were good, but the wife wouldn't be able to use (strength and training).  Did we Find the cache?  No, no access to sign the log.  Was it missing?  Obviously not, but did we Not Find the cache?  Yep, it's a DNF.


That’s all I usually do.  I went to find it, but Did Not Find, therefore logged a DNF.  That’s the extent of my DNF log plan.  :cute:

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