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whats best gps for complete begginer


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21 hours ago, mummyanddaddyp said:

hi complete begginer to caching ,

phone shows me near but really not whats the best gps ?

has to be easy to use as usless at complecated things 

 

It can depend on the phone.  Some Apps seem to be more agreeable than others with a given phone.  What Apps, versions, phone and software do you have?

Any new device will be a lot different from what you may be used to, and still only guide you about 30 feet (sometimes more) from a cache.

 

Also, any device is telling you something.  It takes practice to use it well, and you use Geocaching techniques to hunt caches.  Remember that no device will always take you to "zero feet", directly on top of every cache box!

 

Look at the Garmin Etrex 22x.  It's compact (fits in most pockets!), nothing fancy, it gets you there.  Lots of people use these just fine.  There's of course a whole range of handheld GPS to compare, see the GPS area of this forum.  If you like the handy instant info on a phone, a handheld GPS is a whole other ballgame.  But you can still use the phone at times for extra info (I do), at least when there's a data signal.

 

Edited by kunarion
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I just started using my phone & the Geocaching App a couple of weeks ago.   So far no issues.   This came about because my Garmin Oregon 450 finally died.   It's the only GPS I've ever owned and I'd recommend it for any level of cacher.    I've seen used ones for around $150.00 and new ones for about $325.00.   Since your new to the activity I'd suggest you stick with the app,  at least for a while.   Some time down the line, if your still enjoying caching, think about a stand alone GPS.   I found my Oregon 450 especially handy when I decided I wanted to start hiding caches.  

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54 minutes ago, kunarion said:

 

It can depend on the phone.  Some Apps seem to be more agreeable than others with a given phone.  What Apps, versions, phone and software do you have?

Any new device will be a lot different from what you may be used to, and still only guide you about 30 feet (sometimes more) from a cache.

 

Also, any device is telling you something.  It takes practice to use it well, and you use Geocaching techniques to hunt caches.  Remember that no device will always take you to "zero feet", directly on top of every cache box!

 

Look at the Garmin Etrex 22x.  It's compact (fits in most pockets!), nothing fancy, it gets you there.  Lots of people use these just fine.  There's of course a whole range of handheld GPS to compare, see the GPS area of this forum.  If you like the handy instant info on a phone, a handheld GPS is a whole other ballgame.  But you can still use the phone at times for extra info (I do), at least when there's a data signal.

 

thanks

 

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46 minutes ago, justintim1999 said:

I just started using my phone & the Geocaching App a couple of weeks ago.   So far no issues.   This came about because my Garmin Oregon 450 finally died.   It's the only GPS I've ever owned and I'd recommend it for any level of cacher.    I've seen used ones for around $150.00 and new ones for about $325.00.   Since your new to the activity I'd suggest you stick with the app,  at least for a while.   Some time down the line, if your still enjoying caching, think about a stand alone GPS.   I found my Oregon 450 especially handy when I decided I wanted to start hiding caches.  

thanks

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1 hour ago, Max and 99 said:

What do you mean? People all over the world use the app to find geocaches. It works quite well. Maybe we can help you if you're having trouble with the app?

just keeps sending me to wrong place e.g says im next to it when its somewhere else

 

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19 minutes ago, mummyanddaddyp said:

just keeps sending me to wrong place e.g says im next to it when its somewhere else

 

Like Max and 99, could you further explain ?  Thanks.  :)

Civilian GPS is still only accurate to around ten feet.   The distance can be more, as that could be 10' for you, and 10' for the CO.

If you're around a  22'  distance from the container, that could be close as you get.

Tell you the truth, we put our GPSrs away when we're walking towards the container, and it drops to around 20 feet.  ;)

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2 hours ago, cerberus1 said:

Like Max and 99, could you further explain ?  Thanks.  :)

Civilian GPS is still only accurate to around ten feet.   The distance can be more, as that could be 10' for you, and 10' for the CO.

If you're around a  22'  distance from the container, that could be close as you get.

Tell you the truth, we put our GPSrs away when we're walking towards the container, and it drops to around 20 feet.  ;)

And accuracy within 10ft (3m) is under ideal circumstances. Under less than ideal circumstances, the accuracy can be much worse than that.

 

I've found caches in locations where the EPE ("Estimated  Position Error") reported by my handheld GPS device was well over 100ft (30m). But in those situations, the owners provided hints to help seekers narrow their search to a more manageable search area.

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Remember, no matter what you use to locate GZ, the spot he coordinates say to go to, there is a 30 foot error area . When you got to GZ it could be anywhere within 30 feet any direction, if the coordinates are spot on. You can usually rule out certain spots. The more you cache the more you will recognize typical spots for caches.

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To address the question that was asked: "it depends".

 

On 4/28/2021 at 3:22 AM, mummyanddaddyp said:

whats the best gps ?

 

The GPS that I consider "best" and bought is the Garmin Foretrex 301 - but I mainly need it for things other than GeoCaching. The feature list that I need is very different to what you need. For me it works because when I use it for caching, I need to know where I am (placing a cache) not where I am going (looking for a cache). This one does not have the option to put in coords and for it to tell you how to get there (actually it does, it's just very time consuming and difficult).

 

Some people prefer a more complex GPS with a color screen so that they can do Where I Go cache-games as well as regular caches. Some people prefer an LCD screen because they tend to last longer before needing recharge / fresh batteries than a color screen. Some people prefer a simple hiking GPS that can lead them to a waypoint, others prefer one that can be loaded with maps and have you follow known trails. Other features are either fully hand operated so you can just enter your next cache, others prefer to connect it to their computer and load hundreds of caches so that it pops up a warning when they are near a cache a few weeks later.

 

Here's a nice article with a list of features a GeoCacher would want from their GPS. It's probably a good idea to try and work out what features you need before you go buying one on the recommendation of someone else. The easiest way to find out may be if you go on Facebook and find a local geocaching group near where you live, there may be existing cachers willing to show you their GPS and how they use their features. Almost a "try before you buy".

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On 4/30/2021 at 8:29 AM, Unit473L said:

To address the question that was asked: "it depends".

 

 

The GPS that I considthanks er "best" and bought is the Garmin Foretrex 301 - but I mainly need it for things other than GeoCaching. The feature list that I need is very different to what you need. For me it works because when I use it for caching, I need to know where I am (placing a cache) not where I am going (looking for a cache). This one does not have the option to put in coords and for it to tell you how to get there (actually it does, it's just very time consuming and difficult).

 

Some people prefer a more complex GPS with a color screen so that they can do Where I Go cache-games as well as regular caches. Some people prefer an LCD screen because they tend to last longer before needing recharge / fresh batteries than a color screen. Some people prefer a simple hiking GPS that can lead them to a waypoint, others prefer one that can be loaded with maps and have you follow known trails. Other features are either fully hand operated so you can just enter your next cache, others prefer to connect it to their computer and load hundreds of caches so that it pops up a warning when they are near a cache a few weeks later.

 

Here's a nice article with a list of features a GeoCacher would want from their GPS. It's probably a good idea to try and work out what features you need before you go buying one on the recommendation of someone else. The easiest way to find out may be if you go on Facebook and find a local geocaching group near where you live, there may be existing cachers willing to show you their GPS and how they use their features. Almost a "try before you buy".

many thanks will have a read

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On 4/28/2021 at 10:35 PM, Jayeffel said:

Remember, no matter what you use to locate GZ, the spot he coordinates say to go to, there is a 30 foot error area . When you got to GZ it could be anywhere within 30 feet any direction, if the coordinates are spot on. You can usually rule out certain spots. The more you cache the more you will recognize typical spots for caches.

learning things thanks very much

 

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12 hours ago, mummyanddaddyp said:

no compass on phone

 

What model phone do you have? If your phone has a GPS receiver chip, then it can probably work with compass apps, which will have a built-in calibration function (which is often something simple like having the app running and moving the phone in a figure-8 pattern). There are also GPS test / calibration apps that do the same.

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Most people use their phone, but like other people have said it depends on phone. If your phone is not good enough maybe buy an eTrex 10/20x from Garmin as it is a reliable and fast GPS. But also remember it is not the only option out there!

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I have been caching for a few years and I still use a basic model.  Dakota 20 ( disconnected and now replaced with the Garmin Etrex 22).  A good friend of mine uses a Garmin Extrex 10 and has over 7K in finds.  You can get the most basic model for approximately 109.  I like my Dakota since I can hook it up and download my lists of caches.  

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