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Practical deployment of the Garmin Montana 700 (or 700i / 750i) while hiking


DragonsWest
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Handheld seems to entirely encapsulate their vision.  You are apparently meant to always have it in your hand.  From box contents I do not see the lovely little slide on clip the Oregon models have.

 

I have come to rely upon having the caribiner (which the Oregon 600 came with) hooked onto my backpack strap while I'm trudging along.  Keeps my hands free for camera, hiking pole, picking up caches, signing logs, juggling trackables, etc.

 

So now comes the question:  How are people not handolding their Montana 700 series?

 

I'm eyeballing that bicycle handbar mount with the idea of looping some paracord through there and chucking the bit that goes round the bar, just the back and the immediate screwed on surface.

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I've taken the bicycle mount (for 60 series) and mounted it on one of my trek poles, it looks like that might work of for the Montana.  It always easy to look at, it's kept away from the body so it gets good sky view, and makes it easy to plant at a spot to average co-ords.  It does take a little getting used to the extra weight for one hand, but now it seems 'odd' to use the pole without the unit.

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2 hours ago, Atlas Cached said:

Yes, it will still be up to you to work out how to attach it. May need some para-cord.

 

?

 

I thought from their page this would insert in somewhere on the top of the unit.  Sounds like that is not the case.  I may go with the bike mount after all.

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17 minutes ago, DragonsWest said:

 

?

 

I thought from their page this would insert in somewhere on the top of the unit.  Sounds like that is not the case.  I may go with the bike mount after all.

 

The 700 has lanyard attachment points top and bottom, the 700i and 750i top only.

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14 minutes ago, DragonsWest said:

Looking at the back there doesn't appear to be the same slot as the Oregon has.

Ohh... I missed that we were talking about the Montana 700.

From what I gather, the Montana 700 wasn't designed with hiking as its primary use. 

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4 minutes ago, Mineral2 said:

Ohh... I missed that we were talking about the Montana 700.

From what I gather, the Montana 700 wasn't designed with hiking as its primary use. 

Nobody could ever accuse Garmin as having their head screwed on correctly.  What else would people do with this?  Use it in the bathtub?

 

I have maps on my dash, from Garmin where the roads are highlighted in white one a yellow background.  I asked them about the ability to change the color scheme and was told, no, you can't.   That's just idiotic on a 4 inch display you are meant to use while driving.

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It's a brick for sure. I carry my beloved Montana 680T on either the front chest strap in a pouch on my large backpack and when using my small pack I put it in a front shirt pocket. 

  I was thinking of getting this Montana 700 but it's so huge and I'm not sure if I can carry it the ways I do above with comfort or practical wise. 

  I was hoping for an upgrade to the Montana 6** series but this is extreme. Tough for me to grasp it. How are you 700 owners doing with it?

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The Montana 7x0 is a beast, for sure. Will not fit in most shirt pockets. I carry mine in my cargo pants pocket. There are a few third party cases (see post above) that seem to fit it nicely, so if you are willing to add another 'case' to your belt or pack, this may be an option for you. There is no spine mount on the back, so it can not be attached directly to a strap or belt without additional bulky gear.

 

I am still hoping the next Oregon will be more in line with what most Montana 6x0 users were hoping for.

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2 hours ago, Atlas Cached said:

The Montana 7x0 is a beast, for sure. Will not fit in most shirt pockets. I carry mine in my cargo pants pocket. There are a few third party cases (see post above) that seem to fit it nicely, so if you are willing to add another 'case' to your belt or pack, this may be an option for you. There is no spine mount on the back, so it can not be attached directly to a strap or belt without additional bulky gear.

 

I am still hoping the next Oregon will be more in line with what most Montana 6x0 users were hoping for.

I wouldn't mind a little bit larger then current  600 series with the capibility of the newest gps functions for accuracy. 

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On 3/11/2021 at 6:53 PM, Mineral2 said:

From what I gather, the Montana 700 wasn't designed with hiking as its primary use. 

 

My brother has a "Monterra" (older model with a similar form) in his Jeep.  I was so envious that it securely snap right into its dash mount charger with built-in speaker for nice loud VOICE prompts for street routing.  It's a huge GPS to carry on a hike, but it's also too expensive a toy to leave on a dashboard.  If a cheap old Nuvi just won't do, and you don't need a compact hiking GPS, it may be just the ticket.  It might be especially suited to an ATV or motorbike, or some boats.

 

 

Edited by kunarion
The Governor ordered me to edit the text.
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Yes, very very much. However, I would strongly caution anyone against the inReach  models. Garmin have really shot themselves in the foot with the inReach implementation, allowing it to interfere with other device operation in unpredictable ways (see the Features Page here). If considering a new Montana 7x0, the 700 is probably the best option for most users. Those who want inReach capability can pair the 700 with any other Garmin inReach device.

 

My favorite two Garmin devices to grab when I go out the door (I have dozens to choose from) are the Montana 7x0 and the GPSMAP 66sr. Of course, one is touchscreen and the other push button operated, so apples and oranges.

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The wife has a 66st. She's thinking of taking over my Montana 680. Bigger screen. We have a ResQLink PBL that will do the job if ever needed so I have no need for a subscription and Inreach. 

 

I too have read the issues with the 700i and normal gps uses and agree. I probably should find one to hold and  test and see if the size will turn me off more then the benefits. 

 

No stores around me carry them might have to order one. 

 

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My Montana 700 arrived, with AA-battery back and bicycle mount.  A loop of cord between the mount and a lark's head around the base of a carabiner and I'll be fine sliging it on my backpack shoulder strap.  They certainly should have given that some thought, not everyone is going to be happy carrying that in their hand on an 18 mile hike.  A bit of cord through those lanyard fasts would probably cut as they aren't smooth, but sharpish.  Not something I want hanging on a bit of string anyway, the places I scramble to where I want both hands free.

 

Yessss.  It' is a brick.  Big 5 inch screen, easy to read.  Curiously, the cache icons are nearly microscopic.   Has anyone found a way to make those bigger?

Seems perfectly happy with my Eneloop Pro NiMH cells running it.  Loaded up the first back of pocket queries about the same speed as the old Oregon, so there's not much more CPU in there than the older models.  Supports GPS, GPS + GLONASS or GPS + Galileo. 

 

Has a pretty good North and Central America continuous TOPO map in there, so that's a plus when you think the cache is only 160 feet away and that direction is a drop off or a wall of rock you are at the foot of.

 

 

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1 hour ago, DragonsWest said:

My Montana 700 arrived, with AA-battery back and bicycle mount.  A loop of cord between the mount and a lark's head around the base of a carabiner and I'll be fine sliging it on my backpack shoulder strap.  They certainly should have given that some thought, not everyone is going to be happy carrying that in their hand on an 18 mile hike.  A bit of cord through those lanyard fasts would probably cut as they aren't smooth, but sharpish.  Not something I want hanging on a bit of string anyway, the places I scramble to where I want both hands free.

 

Yessss.  It' is a brick.  Big 5 inch screen, easy to read.  Curiously, the cache icons are nearly microscopic.   Has anyone found a way to make those bigger?

Seems perfectly happy with my Eneloop Pro NiMH cells running it.  Loaded up the first back of pocket queries about the same speed as the old Oregon, so there's not much more CPU in there than the older models.  Supports GPS, GPS + GLONASS or GPS + Galileo. 

 

Has a pretty good North and Central America continuous TOPO map in there, so that's a plus when you think the cache is only 160 feet away and that direction is a drop off or a wall of rock you are at the foot of.

 

 

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Cool.  I’ve thought it would be an awesome replacement for my Nuvi.  Then I see the price, and decide the Nuvi is fine for now.

 

See if this helps for icons:  http://www.gpsrchive.com/Montana/Custom Waypoint Symbols.html

 

I loaded a slightly different set of icons to my Oregon.  I also changed the Treasure Chest icon to a Smilie icon (mine came from the factory with a weirdly huge Treasure Chest icon).  The icons have a size limit, but there are larger sets.

 

Edited by kunarion
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Posted (edited)
Quote


20 hours ago, kunarion said:

Cool.  I’ve thought it would be an awesome replacement for my Nuvi.  Then I see the price, and decide the Nuvi is fine for now.


See if this helps for icons: http://www.gpsrchive.com/Montana/Custom Waypoint Symbols.html


I loaded a slightly different set of icons to my Oregon.  I also changed the Treasure Chest icon to a Smilie icon (mine came from the factory with a weirdly huge Treasure Chest icon).  The icons have a size limit, but there are larger sets.

 


17 hours ago, Atlas Cached said:


I use the 'Geocaching 32x' Cache icons found at GPSrChive > How To... > Waypoints > Custom Waypoint Symbols.

 


Yes, these will serve me well!

 

And now, Ardvark Ratnik will rule the world!  Muah ha ha ha haaah!

 

Oop, sorry about that.  Yes, these look much better on the  big screen and less like ants from the top of a tall building.

Edited by DragonsWest
Editor is very strange and fights the will of the poster. Wanted to include both posters comments and this worked not at all, now it looks poor, but has both quotes.
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Having hiked quite a lot with my 700i, I tend to hold mine in my hand (I am often looking at it for geocaching) with it in a Tusita silicone case and a paracord / large carabiner to hook it from fingers / branch when signing logs etc.  I favor the extra grip the silicone case gives the unit. 

Edited by Maingray
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First real hike and find the bundled TOPO map, while useful does make it quirky with lag.  For faster navigation my old OSM state maps are painless to use.  I should get them updated as they are years old now.  

 

Li-ion battery holds up well for 6 hours hiking, with 70% remaining.  I do blank the screen while not looking at it. There is no way this would last a week, so keeping a AA Back in the pack will be necessary for trips.  Unless there is a dedicated charger option, none was included, charging can only be done through the unit, which is a nuisance.

 

Rugged enough to survive the first fumble, it landed on the antenna protrusion, to no apparent injury.

 

The big view is very good, though I did notice the inability to read descriptions as the battery voltage was dropping, had to reboot and restart track.  This is a glitch in the Oregon models, which has not been fixed.  Also, one time I blanked the screen it would not come back, so had to reboot and restart.

 

Otherwise it performed well and the larger size was not much of an issue.

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On 3/19/2021 at 4:00 PM, DragonsWest said:

My Montana 700 arrived, with AA-battery back and bicycle mount.  A loop of cord between the mount and a lark's head around the base of a carabiner and I'll be fine sliging it on my backpack shoulder strap.  They certainly should have given that some thought, not everyone is going to be happy carrying that in their hand on an 18 mile hike.  A bit of cord through those lanyard fasts would probably cut as they aren't smooth, but sharpish.  Not something I want hanging on a bit of string anyway, the places I scramble to where I want both hands free.

 

Yessss.  It' is a brick.  Big 5 inch screen, easy to read.  Curiously, the cache icons are nearly microscopic.   Has anyone found a way to make those bigger?

Seems perfectly happy with my Eneloop Pro NiMH cells running it.  Loaded up the first back of pocket queries about the same speed as the old Oregon, so there's not much more CPU in there than the older models.  Supports GPS, GPS + GLONASS or GPS + Galileo. 

 

Has a pretty good North and Central America continuous TOPO map in there, so that's a plus when you think the cache is only 160 feet away and that direction is a drop off or a wall of rock you are at the foot of.

 

 

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3.jpg

 

I'm just wondering what kind of battery life I can expect if I have a track log recording with an interval of 1 second?

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1 hour ago, DragonsWest said:

I did notice the inability to read descriptions as the battery voltage was dropping, had to reboot and restart track.  This is a glitch in the Oregon models, which has not been fixed.

 

Please tell me more.

 

Exactly how is this duplicated on the Montana, and which model Oregons?

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On 3/28/2021 at 8:46 PM, Sgt_Strider said:

 

I'm just wondering what kind of battery life I can expect if I have a track log recording with an interval of 1 second?

I did go on a hike of about 6 hours, recording a track log, interval at 15 seconds, using the screen blanking to save power and found the LiON pack was down 30% at the end of it.  Since this pack is new I can probably expect it to perform well on a day hike for a few years, after that LiON batteries seem to go downhill pretty fast.  I have some packs for other devices which are mostly dead at about 7 years.

 

I did a similar hike, but not recording with AA back with Eneloop Pro batteries and it went down about the same amount for a similar length hike.  I don't think tracking is adding much burden the power consumption.  The bonus of the AA back is I can swap batteries with another set of  Eneloops on the trail or some Alkalines from any store along the way.  I don't know how they will hold up, but they'll probably do for several hours.

 

A major pain is the LiON packs can ONLY be charged while in the GPSr unit, so you want to charge up the pack or multiple ones it's stuck doing that and nothing else.  I can't fathom why they do not have a stand alone charger for this.

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On 3/28/2021 at 10:20 PM, Atlas Cached said:

 

Please tell me more.

 

Exactly how is this duplicated on the Montana, and which model Oregons?

I had one of the early Oregon 450 units, long since gone and I still have an Oregon 600.   All three of these GPSr units have some problem as the battery voltage drops a bit - bringing up logs or descriptions will flicker, go blank, give a white screen, and repeat this as you jab your finger at the screen.  Restarting the unit resolves the problem.  I didn't expect to see this again in the new Montana 700.

 

LiON and NiMH have a long discharge curve where the battery voltage changes very little until just before the end.  So 3.6 Volts fresh from charging may remain 3.6 to 3.5 for hours and then drop to 2.9, 2.5, 2.0 in minutes.  I was only at about 2 hours into my hike when the Montana replicated this behavior.  It sure beats the heck out of my why battery voltage will affect the ability to retrieve text from memory and display it, but there it is.  Garmin have heard about this many times since the Oregon 450 debuted, still have this glitch.  Can't imagine they get away with this on anything sold to DoD or for general transporation use.

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1 hour ago, DragonsWest said:

I had one of the early Oregon 450 units, long since gone and I still have an Oregon 600.   All three of these GPSr units have some problem as the battery voltage drops a bit - bringing up logs or descriptions will flicker, go blank, give a white screen, and repeat this as you jab your finger at the screen.  Restarting the unit resolves the problem.  I didn't expect to see this again in the new Montana 700.

 

What you describe sounds exactly like what happens when geocaches are loaded to the device after they have been edited by third party software (GSAK, etc.), and a geocache with corrupt data is called up on the device, resulting in a crash, which can look exactly like you describe.

 

I do not think this has anything to do with partially discharged batteries on any of these devices. I think it is all related to corrupt GPX files.

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20 hours ago, DragonsWest said:

I did go on a hike of about 6 hours, recording a track log, interval at 15 seconds, using the screen blanking to save power and found the LiON pack was down 30% at the end of it.  Since this pack is new I can probably expect it to perform well on a day hike for a few years, after that LiON batteries seem to go downhill pretty fast.  I have some packs for other devices which are mostly dead at about 7 years.

 

I did a similar hike, but not recording with AA back with Eneloop Pro batteries and it went down about the same amount for a similar length hike.  I don't think tracking is adding much burden the power consumption.  The bonus of the AA back is I can swap batteries with another set of  Eneloops on the trail or some Alkalines from any store along the way.  I don't know how they will hold up, but they'll probably do for several hours.

 

A major pain is the LiON packs can ONLY be charged while in the GPSr unit, so you want to charge up the pack or multiple ones it's stuck doing that and nothing else.  I can't fathom why they do not have a stand alone charger for this.

 

I wonder if you can test this with a recording interval of one second and blanking and screen when not in use to see what the battery life is like. 

 

I really hope Garmin release an updated model with multi-band and multi-gnss support soon!

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43 minutes ago, Sgt_Strider said:

I really hope Garmin release an updated model with multi-band and multi-gnss support soon!

 

The original Montana 6x0 enjoyed a nine year lifespan before the 7x0 was introduced just a year ago now, so I doubt there will be yet another Montana variant any time soon....

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17 minutes ago, Atlas Cached said:

 

The original Montana 6x0 enjoyed a nine year lifespan before the 7x0 was introduced just a year ago now, so I doubt there will be yet another Montana variant any time soon....

 

The 66 series was on the market for how long? About a year or two before the SR was released? Don't see any reason why Garmin can't release an updated version of the 700, which can utilize AA batteries! Maybe finally make the transition to USB-C!

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56 minutes ago, Sgt_Strider said:

The 66 series was on the market for how long? About a year or two before the SR was released? Don't see any reason why Garmin can't release an updated version of the 700

 

Sure, but I am just looking at patterns here....

 

The GPSMap 60C/CS were announced November 18, 2003.

The GPSMap 60, a variant of the 60 series, was announced January 5, 2005. (1.3 years later)

The GPSMap 60CSx, another variant of the 60 series, was announced January 3, 2006. (2.3 years after the original)

The GPSMap 62, a totally new device, was announced June 2, 2010. (7.7 years after the original 60 series)

The GPSMAP 64, an evolution of the 62 series, was announced January 13, 2014. (3.5 years after the 62)

The GPSMAP 66s/st, a totally new device, was announced September 5, 2018. (4.7 years after the 64)

The GPSMAP 66i, a variant of the GPSMAP 66, was announced June 5, 2019. (0.7 years after the original 66)

The GPSMAP 64x, a variant of the GPSMAP 64, was also announced June 5, 2019. (5.4 years after the original 64)

The GPSMAP 66sr, another variant of the GPSMAP 66, was announced September 24, 2020. (2 years after the original 66)

The GPSMAP 65, an evolution of the GPSMAP 64, was also announced September 24, 2020. (6.8 years after the original 64)

 

The Montana 600/650 were announced May 18, 2011.

The Montana 610/680, a variant of the original, was announced August 25, 2015. (4.3 years later)

The Montana 7x0, a totally new device, was announced August 5, 2020. (5 years after the 6x0 refresh or 9.3 years after the original 6x0)

 

The GPSMAP 6x series saw 12 distinct updates between 2003 and 2020, or an average of one update every 1.4 years. (The first refresh took 1.3 years)

The Montana saw only three updates between 2011 and 2020, or an average of one update every 3.1 years. (The first 'refresh' took 4.3 years)

 

The GPSMAP 66i and GPSMAP 66sr stayed true to previous GPSMAP 6x series update and refresh patterns.

If the Montana 7x0 stays true to previous update and refresh patterns, the next 'variant' will not be announced until sometime around late 2024, or early 2025.

 

These two model lines have much different update patterns, so hoping for a quick Montana update based on the update pattern of the GPSMAP 6x series is likely, at best, very wishful thinking.

 

 

57 minutes ago, Sgt_Strider said:

Maybe finally make the transition to USB-C!

 

This would likely only occur when a completely new model is announced as it requires a substantial hardware change. The Montana 6x0 didn't see a hardware change for 9.3 years, which would suggest the next 'all-new' Montana might show up somewhere around late 2030 or early 2031.

 

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2 hours ago, Atlas Cached said:

 

Sure, but I am just looking at patterns here....

 

The GPSMap 60C/CS were announced November 18, 2003.

The GPSMap 60, a variant of the 60 series, was announced January 5, 2005. (1.3 years later)

The GPSMap 60CSx, another variant of the 60 series, was announced January 3, 2006. (2.3 years after the original)

The GPSMap 62, a totally new device, was announced June 2, 2010. (7.7 years after the original 60 series)

The GPSMAP 64, an evolution of the 62 series, was announced January 13, 2014. (3.5 years after the 62)

The GPSMAP 66s/st, a totally new device, was announced September 5, 2018. (4.7 years after the 64)

The GPSMAP 66i, a variant of the GPSMAP 66, was announced June 5, 2019. (0.7 years after the original 66)

The GPSMAP 64x, a variant of the GPSMAP 64, was also announced June 5, 2019. (5.4 years after the original 64)

The GPSMAP 66sr, another variant of the GPSMAP 66, was announced September 24, 2020. (2 years after the original 66)

The GPSMAP 65, an evolution of the GPSMAP 64, was also announced September 24, 2020. (6.8 years after the original 64)

 

The Montana 600/650 were announced May 18, 2011.

The Montana 610/680, a variant of the original, was announced August 25, 2015. (4.3 years later)

The Montana 7x0, a totally new device, was announced August 5, 2020. (5 years after the 6x0 refresh or 9.3 years after the original 6x0)

 

The GPSMAP 6x series saw 12 distinct updates between 2003 and 2020, or an average of one update every 1.4 years. (The first refresh took 1.3 years)

The Montana saw only three updates between 2011 and 2020, or an average of one update every 3.1 years. (The first 'refresh' took 4.3 years)

 

The GPSMAP 66i and GPSMAP 66sr stayed true to previous GPSMAP 6x series update and refresh patterns.

If the Montana 7x0 stays true to previous update and refresh patterns, the next 'variant' will not be announced until sometime around late 2024, or early 2025.

 

These two model lines have much different update patterns, so hoping for a quick Montana update based on the update pattern of the GPSMAP 6x series is likely, at best, very wishful thinking.

 

 

 

This would likely only occur when a completely new model is announced as it requires a substantial hardware change. The Montana 6x0 didn't see a hardware change for 9.3 years, which would suggest the next 'all-new' Montana might show up somewhere around late 2030 or early 2031.

 

The 66 and the Montana 700 series should have went for USB-C rather than micro-USB. I know what you mean and Garmin is slow with hardware updates. Sadly, I think we'll be stuck with micro-USB for the foreseeable future. 

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On 4/2/2021 at 1:42 PM, Atlas Cached said:

 

What you describe sounds exactly like what happens when geocaches are loaded to the device after they have been edited by third party software (GSAK, etc.), and a geocache with corrupt data is called up on the device, resulting in a crash, which can look exactly like you describe.

 

I do not think this has anything to do with partially discharged batteries on any of these devices. I think it is all related to corrupt GPX files.

 

 

I'll beg to differ.  I have always downloaded zips of my PQs, extracted them and then placed them directly onto the micro SD in the Garmin folder.  All three units. 

 

This behavior seldom happens right away, but typically after a few hours use.

 

I am not the first person to have made this observation.  There does seem to be a corrupting of logic in their units as voltage drops.  It does not have to drop a lot.  No really creative use of the unit was involved.  Simply going along, following the trail to the next cache, marking it found and setting navigation to the next one.  It usually becomes more prominent in behavior as the batteries get near the end.  But on the 700 it happened within a couple of hours, with 80%+ of battery life remaining.

 

The 700 knows the LiON battery and determines life right off, with a % remaining on the map screen.  It's not so sure about NiMH, which makes sense as some are 1500mah while others are up to 2450 mah.

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On 4/3/2021 at 12:51 PM, Atlas Cached said:

 

Sure, but I am just looking at patterns here....

 

The GPSMap 60C/CS were announced November 18, 2003.

The GPSMap 60, a variant of the 60 series, was announced January 5, 2005. (1.3 years later)

The GPSMap 60CSx, another variant of the 60 series, was announced January 3, 2006. (2.3 years after the original)

The GPSMap 62, a totally new device, was announced June 2, 2010. (7.7 years after the original 60 series)

The GPSMAP 64, an evolution of the 62 series, was announced January 13, 2014. (3.5 years after the 62)

The GPSMAP 66s/st, a totally new device, was announced September 5, 2018. (4.7 years after the 64)

The GPSMAP 66i, a variant of the GPSMAP 66, was announced June 5, 2019. (0.7 years after the original 66)

The GPSMAP 64x, a variant of the GPSMAP 64, was also announced June 5, 2019. (5.4 years after the original 64)

The GPSMAP 66sr, another variant of the GPSMAP 66, was announced September 24, 2020. (2 years after the original 66)

The GPSMAP 65, an evolution of the GPSMAP 64, was also announced September 24, 2020. (6.8 years after the original 64)

 

The Montana 600/650 were announced May 18, 2011.

The Montana 610/680, a variant of the original, was announced August 25, 2015. (4.3 years later)

The Montana 7x0, a totally new device, was announced August 5, 2020. (5 years after the 6x0 refresh or 9.3 years after the original 6x0)

 

The GPSMAP 6x series saw 12 distinct updates between 2003 and 2020, or an average of one update every 1.4 years. (The first refresh took 1.3 years)

The Montana saw only three updates between 2011 and 2020, or an average of one update every 3.1 years. (The first 'refresh' took 4.3 years)

 

The GPSMAP 66i and GPSMAP 66sr stayed true to previous GPSMAP 6x series update and refresh patterns.

If the Montana 7x0 stays true to previous update and refresh patterns, the next 'variant' will not be announced until sometime around late 2024, or early 2025.

 

These two model lines have much different update patterns, so hoping for a quick Montana update based on the update pattern of the GPSMAP 6x series is likely, at best, very wishful thinking.

 

 

 

This would likely only occur when a completely new model is announced as it requires a substantial hardware change. The Montana 6x0 didn't see a hardware change for 9.3 years, which would suggest the next 'all-new' Montana might show up somewhere around late 2030 or early 2031.

 

I suspect this update pattern is because garmin sells that many more gpsMAP devices than Montana. The Oregon series have had more updates as well.

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My thoughts on battery life and this 700. I found it has excellent life if proper settings are done. I find a 5 hr  day  running with 3 sec track point drops leaves me with at least 75 % or more battery left. Wifi off bluetooth off backlight off and screen shut off.  

I bought and tried the AA pack and didn't like it. It protruded off the back side and adding 3 aa NiMH's made this brick real heavy. And you only get 2450 MaH vs 3100  and only 1.2 v's with NiMH. I can see why Garmin came out with the Li pack.

   So I bought a spare Li pack. They are light charge fast, hold a charge for months, don't protude, give much better performance and hours. You can always carry a power bank to recharge them.

 

I must say after owning many Garmin handhelds since 1998 this one besides being a brick is awesome. I've gotten use to it's size. It fits nicely in my outdoor shirt pockets and also in a case on my  shoulder strap Aryter'x Kea 37 pack. 

 

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Edited by capt caper
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