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Groundspeak publishing new caches in the midst of statewide stay-at-home order


TheLimeCat
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I am aware that there are a number of threads regarding COVID-19 and geocaching at the moment, but I didn't see this specific topic mentioned, so I thought I'd bring it up. Early last week, Washington's governor issued a proclamation that stated, among other things, that "All people in Washington State shall immediately cease leaving their home or place of residence except: (1) to conduct or participate in essential activities, and/or (2) for employment in essential business services". Similar orders were given across the country, even before this, as I'm sure we are all well-aware. This proclamation was to last until April 6th, at the earliest.

 

I wonder then why a new cache published in an adjacent town on March 29th. A cache that has had 3 confirmed searchers already in the midst of our statewide quarantine. I have seen numerous finds on local caches throughout the last couple weeks, and honestly, if these cachers are confident that they won't be congregating in a popular area and that they are conducting themselves safely as individuals, I don't much care that they're still geocaching, although I wouldn't do so myself. I do think that it's odd that Groundspeak continues to publish new caches both leading up to and during the quarantine. I know that for some people, a proclamation from the governor means little when compared to the near daily activity of geocaching, and that there will be those select few who decide against the better judgment of medical professionals to travel to new and distant geocaches, but as an organization, I find it extremely irresponsible of Groundspeak to encourage the activity by publishing new caches in the midst of this pandemic.

 

Let me just say before closing that I would not be opposed to the publishing of new caches if there were not official quarantines in place. I was personally caching until just a few days before the beginning of quarantine and would have, at that time, supported the publishing of new caches and denounced the disabling of existing ones. 

 

That's just my opinion, and I'm sure it varies by locality. Would like to know what you all think about this. 

 

TLDR: Groundspeak is publishing caches and cachers are finding them in the midst of a state-mandated quarantine. I believe both are ill-advised. 

Edited by TheLimeCat
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(1) to conduct or participate in essential activities, and/or (2) for employment in essential business services"

 

In our area, self-isolated outdoor activity (distance maintained) is in the enumeration of 'essential activities".  How about in Washington?  Likely the same, but please elaborate on what you see there.

 

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2 minutes ago, ecanderson said:

(1) to conduct or participate in essential activities, and/or (2) for employment in essential business services"

 

In our area, self-isolated outdoor activity (distance maintained) is in the enumeration of 'essential activities".  How about in Washington?  Likely the same, but please elaborate on what you see there.

 

Yes, outdoor activities (geocaching included) are allowed provided social distancing measures are followed. The clause states that "Engaging in outdoor exercise activities, such as walking, hiking, running or biking, but only if appropriate social distancing practices are used" is permitted. As I said, I am not opposed to individuals caching on their own if they feel that they are safe in doing so. 

 

That said, I feel that new caches pose a significantly greater risk in that, as we all know, they are likely to draw an influx of local cachers either hunting the FTF or looking for a nearby geocache to find after having exhausted the local supply. For example, one published on 3/20 received 7 finds. 4 in the first 2 days and 2 since quarantine. One published on 3/15 has 13 finds, 4 in the first two days and 2 since quarantine. One published on 3/23 has 11 finds. 8 in the first two days and 3 since quarantine. The cache published 3/29 has 3 visits, 2 finds. All within quarantine. 

 

There are of course further examples, but I feel that new caches are a unique health risk given that the residence time of COVID-19 can be several days depending on the material. 

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A week ago the Australian reviewers stopped publishing new caches nation-wide which I think was a sensible move. The social distancing and stay-at-home orders put in place here a few weeks back and progressively strengthened and enforced are now paying dividends, with the number of new infections detected in this country now declining. We need to do everything we can to keep pushing that number down and get it as close to zero as we can.

 

image.png.f1dd7f400afcd7d97c2730e2ab2536dd.png

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I forgot to mention with regards to hiking as a pastime, that numerous land management agencies have completely or partially closed access for the duration of our quarantine. DNR lands for example are closed until at least April 8th. The National Parks system has closed access roads to many local attractions, campsites, and hiking routes. Knowing this, I believe that hiking, although allowed, would be ill-advised. Regardless, I think that the intent of this clause was to allow residents to maintain healthy exercise habits within their neighborhood or community, not to encourage distance travel to popular regional destinations.

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In contrast, local Public Health Department officials were consulted in regards to closing open spaces in my area, and they asked that they remain open.  However, we've seen steps taken to limit access and closing of parking areas that tend to encourage congregation of large groups, out of an abundance of caution.

 

On a more positive note, preliminary studies suggest that as warmer weather approaches, we might get a slight break from the pandemic, but all in all, I think this issue is going to be with us for quite some time.

 

I think a more reasonable solution would be to actively discourage FTF races, by randomly picking someone in the first 20 Finds for the honor and giving them a souvenir.  If the side game is randomized in some fashion, it seem likely that it would effectively kill it for good.

 

Another positive step would be to ask project-GC to remove the FTF tracking feature from their website.  That would be the responsible thing to do after all.

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47 minutes ago, Keystone said:

That gets to the second problem with your topic title and opening post.  Not every "stay at home" order is written the same way.  They are different in Germany than in Ohio, different in Spain than in Texas. 

Precisely why I copied the wording from Washington's mandate and gave an example cache from Washington, asking others to share their local experience for the purpose of discussion. I fail to see how changing the wording of the title would've made this topic more clear, or at least less abrasive. If I were to use the term "community reviewers", I would be unfairly grouping many reviewers into my experience with a single local reviewer. Conversely, were I to state that reviewer's title, I would be targetting and publicly harassing an individual. My intent was merely to introduce the belief that Groundspeak as a corporation is responsible for actions taken by its representatives, employees, and volunteers who change or add content to the company-owned website. 

 

I do appreciate the response, and I understand that the issue is multifaceted.  With regards to the finding of the caches in parks, I wholeheartedly agree that there is no inherent issue, and that it is entirely possible to find such caches without overstepping the bounds of the current mandate (at least in my area). I am not upset that caches exist or are being found. I am merely stating the fact that new caches represent something of an attractive nuisance whether in a park or a parking lot. They are likely to draw an increased rate of finders for at least a few weeks following publishing and are therefore more of a health risk than any existing cache. I respect the decision not to publish new park and grab caches, but wonder if there isn't an issue with those in parks as well, especially given the abundance of local land closures. 

 

Thanks again. I will write to HQ. 

Edited by TheLimeCat
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1 hour ago, TheLimeCat said:

 not to encourage distance travel to popular regional destinations.

Believe me, the caches we've found recently are in anything but "popular regional destinations".  In fact, they were specifically selected for their 'low profile'.

Our parks are open here, but all playground equipment & etc is taped off and off limits.

 

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30 minutes ago, TheLimeCat said:

My intent was merely to introduce the belief that Groundspeak as a corporation is responsible for actions taken by its representatives, employees, and volunteers who change or add content to the company-owned website.

 

I'll modify my advice by suggesting that you have your lawyer contact the Groundspeak Corporate Legal Department.  They could have a discussion about the Website Terms of Use, especially sections 2.A, 5 and 6.

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1 hour ago, Keystone said:

 

I'll modify my advice by suggesting that you have your lawyer contact the Groundspeak Corporate Legal Department.  They could have a discussion about the Website Terms of Use, especially sections 2.A, 5 and 6.

Exactly my opinion of the semantics discussion from the start.

 

Edit: That is was too lawyerly I mean. My intent was not to belittle those who dedicate their time free of charge to us. That is precisely why I left the words "community reviewer" out of my post. I appreciate that care is taken to review every cache in light of our current situation, but wonder if it couldn't be better, lawsuits aside, of course. 

 

 

Edited by TheLimeCat
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1 hour ago, ecanderson said:

Believe me, the caches we've found recently are in anything but "popular regional destinations".  In fact, they were specifically selected for their 'low profile'.

Our parks are open here, but all playground equipment & etc is taped off and off limits.

 

My opinion about this is based mostly on a couple finds I had on one of my caches in a very popular local park recently. It rubbed me the wrong way to see the magnitude of their caching run that day. Although of course they were perfectly within their rights to find a great number of caches that day, I suspect that the trip was not a minor addition to a necessary errand or a foray into an adjacent neighborhood. I'm sure many cachers, like you, are being especially mindful of their cache hunting at the moment. Others, perhaps not. As is sometimes the case with attractive nuisances. 

Edited by TheLimeCat
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3 hours ago, Keystone said:

Because of the wording of the exception, I am not publishing caches that are considered "park and grabs" such as in front of a residence or in a business parking lot.  You don't go to those places to "exercise."  But caches in parks and forests?  Generally fine

 

Interesting approach. No caches that are in easily accessible places where anyone could be out for a walk around the block and make a quick find. But ok to publish in forests where a cacher could fall, break an ankle, get lost, or suffer some other calamity tying up valuable emergency services time that would be much better utilized elsewhere.

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While it once mattered less outside of the current context of an epidemic, have you ever wondered how many people have handled that package of bacon you picked up at the grocery store?  Due to the silly way bacon is traditionally packaged, it is necessary to flip the packages over to find one or two that don't contain a truly excessive amount of fat. 

 

I DO hope that all of you who are concerned over FTF races are actually washing down your bacon packaging when you bring it into your homes. 

 

Honestly -- is there something special about geocaching?  At this point, safety requires more attention to detail in handling ANYTHING.  Don't assume anyone has done an adequate job of preparing things ahead of you.  Yesterday I watched for a few moments a teenager whose task it was to wipe down the handles of shopping carts before they were returned to the interior of a King Soopers store.  He'd spray his rag and give a cursory swipe across the top of the handle, covering at best 50% of the circumference with whatever cleaner he'd been given, and given the amount being sprayed on the rag, not really saturating even that much of the surface. 

 

At this point, it's every man (and woman) for himself.  Taking personal responsibility for how anything is handled outside of the home (and inside, if you've got a patient already -- a whole 'nuther set of issues!) will either become the norm, or a person risks becoming part of the Darwin Awards.  And yes, it all requires a bit of planning and a great deal of focus in execution to do much of anything safely at the moment.  Do I put on the nitrile gloves before I open the door to the garage, or after I'm already in the car?  On which side of the counter do the 'clean' groceries go, and which ready to be cleaned?  Do both of us in the house know which is which?  The list is endless. 

 

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12 minutes ago, ecanderson said:

While it once mattered less outside of the current context of an epidemic, have you ever wondered how many people have handled that package of bacon you picked up at the grocery store?  Due to the silly way bacon is traditionally packaged, it is necessary to flip the packages over to find one or two that don't contain a truly excessive amount of fat.

When I get home I am washing any goods that I can in soapy water, before placing in the fridge, or if it doesn't need cold storage, leaving on the sink to drain, before placing in the pantry. I am very grateful to have a vegetable garden that is producing well. I haven't needed to buy most vegetables. I have been freezing, drying and bottling excess produce  for winter. Much safer.

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You've got a hemispherical advantage there, GW!  Nothing growing here yet up in Zone 5 of North America.  All the fruit we have left in the freezer are Colorado peaches.

Well done on the precautions.  You sound like the sort that can safely handle caching whenever it's lawful in your neighborhood.

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9 hours ago, funkymunkyzone said:

Interesting approach. No caches that are in easily accessible places where anyone could be out for a walk around the block and make a quick find. But ok to publish in forests where a cacher could fall, break an ankle, get lost, or suffer some other calamity tying up valuable emergency services time that would be much better utilized elsewhere.

 

This post doesn't have a realistic perspective of typical cacher behavior. If a cache can be park-n-grabbed 9 out of 10 finders will do so. Even if there's a perfectly good sidewalk.

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17 hours ago, TheLimeCat said:

Yes, outdoor activities (geocaching included) are allowed provided social distancing measures are followed. The clause states that "Engaging in outdoor exercise activities, such as walking, hiking, running or biking, but only if appropriate social distancing practices are used" is permitted. As I said, I am not opposed to individuals caching on their own if they feel that they are safe in doing so. 

 

Our local reviewers are still publishing new caches; one local cacher is publishing a series, one a day, NBTD Day 1, Day 2, etc....he's up to #17, posted this morning.  We (hubby and I) drove the 7 miles from home to find the first 5 of the series yesterday.  It was a gorgeous, sunny, warm April day and it felt good to get out and walk the neighborhood and find a few caches.  The last finder was 3 days previous, we had gloves and sanitizer, and we saw a few other people but on the opposite side of the street, and we waved.

 

We also nabbed a {FTF} on one 3 miles from home yesterday, another one published this morning but we will let someone else go for that.  And a new multi published 6 miles from us on April 1 that no one has logged yet.  We may go for that one today, as it's near one of ours that got a DNF yesterday so we want to check that one.  I've also seen a couple of brand new names pop up on the found logs some of my local caches, so people are looking at geocaching as something new to do around here.  Will they stick around after this is over?  Who knows, but they are out, finding and logging for now.

 

Local rules recommend "essential travel" limited to 5 miles from home, but considering the nearest town centers  to us (we're in an unincorporated part of the county, rural area) are 8-10 miles in any direction, we have to go that far for some essentials, and if there are new caches to find while we are already out, yeah, we'll add that to do our to do list for the day.  We are still encouraged to get out and get exercise, with members of our own household, within 5 miles (and we stretch it to 10 of necessity).

 

Things change rapidly, almost daily, we'lltake precautions for us and for others, and keep publishing and finding as long as it's allowed.  We've got several caches in the works, and the fun in hiding, publishing, and watching folks find caches is a bright spot amidst all the other news.  

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14 hours ago, funkymunkyzone said:

Interesting approach. No caches that are in easily accessible places where anyone could be out for a walk around the block and make a quick find. But ok to publish in forests where a cacher could fall, break an ankle, get lost, or suffer some other calamity tying up valuable emergency services time that would be much better utilized elsewhere.

 

It was explained in a couple regional forums that this idea was for cache locations that are more compatible with "social distancing".

Hiking trails, or areas far from residential areas and businesses tend to be easier to abide by distancing regulations.  :)

That doesn't mean that one doesn't have to apply common sense based on their abilities though, like they'd do any other time of the year.

 - But there's hundreds of large park n woods trails around me that are only 1.5  in terrain.

 

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2 hours ago, rustynails. said:

If you want to find them that's your choice.

If you don't want to find them that's your choice .

No one is forcing anyone to cache. If your that fearful of getting a virus from touching a cache, stay home.

 

I don't think the OP's statement has much to do with fear, as it does with whether Publishing of new caches is consistent with State ordered mandates.  I do, however, sense some confusion on the OP's part regarding what many States (save for a small handful), have actually ordered, which is a "Shelter in Place" order and NOT a Quarantine.  These are two distinctly different terms.  Shelter in Place orders are voluntary in nature.  Quarantine's can be either voluntary, or imposed by law.   In my home State, we've had a SIP order from the Governor for few weeks now.  While the vast majority of people seem to be willing to comply, there are a few that do not.  We have had a few Quarantine Orders in my State, which are usually administered by the Department of Public Health (the folks that decide who should be isolated), and enforced by Local/State LEO's.  One recent Quarantine Order in my State that most people have heard about, was the Grand Princess Cruise ship that docked in Oakland, CA.  Many of the passengers that were allowed to disembark from the ship were immediately Quarantined on a nearby Air Force Base, under guard.   A small handful of the passengers, exhibiting symptoms were Quarantined in my home town at a State Park facility.  They were also under guard by Federal U.S. Marshals for the duration of there stay, and they were not even allowed to leave their rooms while here (although one passenger was transported to our local hospital for a non COVID-19 issue and had a brief stay as an inpatient).

 

Perhaps the OP is under a Quarantine Order and I'm just not understanding their personal situation.  I, on the other hand, like many of my neighbors, are on a Shelter in Place order, which allows for some limited recreational activity, like bike rides and walks, and maybe snag a couple of caches along the way (with appropriate PPE's of course).

Edited by Touchstone
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6 hours ago, Touchstone said:

I don't think the OP's statement has much to do with fear, as it does with whether Publishing of new caches is consistent with State ordered mandates.  I do, however, sense some confusion on the OP's part regarding what many States (save for a small handful), have actually ordered, which is a "Shelter in Place" order and NOT a Quarantine.  These are two distinctly different terms.  Shelter in Place orders are voluntary in nature.  Quarantine's can be either voluntary, or imposed by law.   In my home State, we've had a SIP order from the Governor for few weeks now.  While the vast majority of people seem to be willing to comply, there are a few that do not.  We have had a few Quarantine Orders in my State, which are usually administered by the Department of Public Health (the folks that decide who should be isolated), and enforced by Local/State LEO's.  One recent Quarantine Order in my State that most people have heard about, was the Grand Princess Cruise ship that docked in Oakland, CA.  Many of the passengers that were allowed to disembark from the ship were immediately Quarantined on a nearby Air Force Base, under guard.   A small handful of the passengers, exhibiting symptoms were Quarantined in my home town at a State Park facility.  They were also under guard by Federal U.S. Marshals for the duration of there stay, and they were not even allowed to leave their rooms while here (although one passenger was transported to our local hospital for a non COVID-19 issue and had a brief stay as an inpatient).

 

Perhaps the OP is under a Quarantine Order and I'm just not understanding their personal situation.  I, on the other hand, like many of my neighbors, are on a Shelter in Place order, which allows for some limited recreational activity, like bike rides and walks, and maybe snag a couple of caches along the way (with appropriate PPE's of course).

You are correct. I was vaguely aware of the distinction, but used the two terms interchangeably. As far as I am aware, there are no law enforcement measures preventing me from going where I please, with the exception of restricted access to public lands. 

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On 4/4/2020 at 12:49 AM, JL_HSTRE said:

 

This post doesn't have a realistic perspective of typical cacher behavior. If a cache can be park-n-grabbed 9 out of 10 finders will do so. Even if there's a perfectly good sidewalk.

 

And one should always abide by the local laws when geocaching.  So for example, if someone's area was subject to a no driving unless for essentials (food/medical) then they would only be allowed to walk or cycle.

 

It just so happens that in our lockdown here in NZ, we are specifically prohibited from hiking, boating, swimming, etc, because of the (even slightly) increased risk of requiring emergency assistance should something go wrong.

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On 4/4/2020 at 6:11 AM, cerberus1 said:

 

It was explained in a couple regional forums that this idea was for cache locations that are more compatible with "social distancing".

Hiking trails, or areas far from residential areas and businesses tend to be easier to abide by distancing regulations.  :)

That doesn't mean that one doesn't have to apply common sense based on their abilities though, like they'd do any other time of the year.

 - But there's hundreds of large park n woods trails around me that are only 1.5  in terrain.

 

 

I don't disagree that those locations may be more favourable for social distancing.  Just pointing out that in such times where our emergency services and medical frontline are somewhat occupied, better to not risk adding to their workload.  The NZ government has taken this approach.  Yes it's a regional thing in terms of the rules, and sometimes I think common sense might be a regional thing too.

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16 minutes ago, funkymunkyzone said:

 

I don't disagree that those locations may be more favourable for social distancing.  Just pointing out that in such times where our emergency services and medical frontline are somewhat occupied, better to not risk adding to their workload.  The NZ government has taken this approach.  Yes it's a regional thing in terms of the rules, and sometimes I think common sense might be a regional thing too.

 

There are risks in exercising in suburbia too, like being hit by a car or bitten by a dog, or, depending on the neighbourhood I suppose, even getting assaulted. Go out riding a bike, which the authorities here say is okay and even recommend, and the risks multiply. Or you could just stay inside 24/7 eating Easter eggs (which seem to be the only thing in plentiful supply in the supermarkets here) until you have a heart attack and become an even bigger burden on those same emergency services. Anyway, don't they say most accidents happen in the home? Nothing's black or white and It's a question of finding a balance, and for me, going for a walk along a deserted fire trail in the bushland adjoining my suburb seems a safer and more mentally stimulating form of exercise than riding my bike around and around the block.

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11 hours ago, colleda said:

My physical activity of choice is windsurfing. Today I drove straight to my regular launching area (about 15klm), blasted back and forth across the lake for an hour and a half (good breeze today) then drove straight home.

OT a bit...

Nice !     Sounds like fun.   :)

Mine's fly-fishing .  Most our creeks and lakes were stocked, and even though the season start has been extended, it's illegal to fish stocked waters the end of February to the opener.   The other non-hiking/caching hobbies tend to attract groups.

Not sure how my luck changed, but another new cache was published with a bit of distance (but level) today.   Now to find a day w/o rain...

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2 hours ago, cerberus1 said:

OT a bit...

Nice !     Sounds like fun.   :)

Mine's fly-fishing .  Most our creeks and lakes were stocked, and even though the season start has been extended, it's illegal to fish stocked waters the end of February to the opener.   The other non-hiking/caching hobbies tend to attract groups.

Not sure how my luck changed, but another new cache was published with a bit of distance (but level) today.   Now to find a day w/o rain...

Yes, It was a little obtuse as far as the topic goes but what I meant to imply is that during my exercise I go nowhere else, do not associate with others and I touch nothing except my car and my equipment. I drive past some of my caches that I would normally check as OM but they can wait. I am mobile but isolated. My activity does not take me past sweaty, panting joggers or cyclists. I also cycle but not at the moment for reason given. I live by the water and there are many more anglers and walkers than normal. Many anglers are in kayaks, keeping their distance.

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I do not understand why new caches are being placed in areas where there is stay at home orders.  The only reason we should be outside our house is for mandatory / essential travel  Going after a new cache is dangerous in areas of a stay at home order, and irresponsible for the CO / reviewer to post a new cache.

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4 minutes ago, ormustr said:

I do not understand why new caches are being placed in areas where there is stay at home orders.  The only reason we should be outside our house is for mandatory / essential travel  Going after a new cache is dangerous in areas of a stay at home order, and irresponsible for the CO / reviewer to post a new cache.

We are actively encouraged to go outside and enjoy the outdoors. The city even reminds us of the numerous activities and places we can go to have fun outdoors. Some places are restricted, though. I am no longer allowed to play disc golf at city courses. Playground equipment is banned. 

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12 minutes ago, ormustr said:

I do not understand why new caches are being placed in areas where there is stay at home orders.  The only reason we should be outside our house is for mandatory / essential travel  Going after a new cache is dangerous in areas of a stay at home order, and irresponsible for the CO / reviewer to post a new cache.

You attended an event cache two weeks ago!

In the words of Shawn Spencer... "Wait for iiiiiittttt..." .

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11 minutes ago, ormustr said:

I do not understand why new caches are being placed in areas where there is stay at home orders.  The only reason we should be outside our house is for mandatory / essential travel  Going after a new cache is dangerous in areas of a stay at home order, and irresponsible for the CO / reviewer to post a new cache.

No new caches are being published in Australia; even though not all of Australia is in lock-down. The local reviewers discussed this and came to this conclusion. I agree with it, because it avoids FTF crowds. However there is nothing wrong with getting some exercise and finding a cache (or more) while doing so. Bring the hand sanitiser, although of the caches I have found in the last few days, not all were found recently; one of them a year and a half ago. (I cache on two different sites.) I live in Canberra and we don't have lock-down, although over the border in NSW they do. But I believe they are still allowed out for exercise. In practice though in Canberra, although not in lock-down, many people are in effect in lock-down, only going out for food, medical reasons and exercise. Voluntary lock-down appears to be mostly working where I am. I am going out for exercise, either walking or riding from my home, or driving to a nature park, the latter I plan on doing today. However, because surrounding NSW has a lock-down, we in Canberra are in effect now living on an island. We can drive freely around the ACT (the territory Canberra is in), but it's not wise to drive across the border, as NSW has lock-down. Still, lots of places in the ACT 'island' I can go, cache, get exercise and avoid other people.

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13 minutes ago, ormustr said:

 

Yup before our stay at home order went active.

Then why fake log that you attended if you were allowed to go out?

Maybe everyone else you think is being irresponsible is fake-logging too.

Maybe they are sitting at home too, logging finds and being "responsible".

Maybe they're thinking "Hey, if ormustr can do it, why can't I? This will really help my Find count!

 

Edited by Max and 99
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3 minutes ago, Goldenwattle said:

But I believe they are still allowed out for exercise. In practice though in Canberra, although not in lock-down, many people are in effect in lock-down, only going out for food, medical reasons and exercise. Voluntary lock-down appears to be mostly working where I am. I am going out for exercise, either walking or riding from my home, or driving to a nature park, the latter I plan on doing today. However, because surrounding NSW has a lock-down, we in Canberra are in effect now living on an island. We can drive freely around the ACT (the territory Canberra is in), but it's not wise to drive across the border, as NSW has lock-down. Still, lots of places in the ACT 'island' I can go, cache, get exercise and avoid other people.

 

Yes, we're still allowed out for exercise in NSW, although they want us to do it locally. I'm fortunate that my suburb is surrounded by serene bushland where I can stretch my legs while soaking in the calmness of nature. This track on Mt Ettalong, about a kilometre from home, is one of my favourite spots for that and yes, there are a couple of caches along there (one of them mine), neither of which have had any finds in the last couple of months.

 

MtEttalong.jpg.84a0adf9c46d88024675de95c099db26.jpg

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2 hours ago, Lynx Humble said:

I agree with the OP that Groundspeak should be more proactive in this Covid-19 Pandemic. For the moment they are awfully quiet.

 

I realize the two are close, but isn't the site being proactive ?   It seems (to me) they're focusing on issues as/before they appear...    :)

Moving event dates, or eliminating them altogether are a good example .  Many people not good for social distancing.

 - Now some areas have enforced limits on how many people are in one place.  

Another example of proactive is our Reviewers are not publishing caches in urban, or heavily-populated areas, but are in areas that people can abide by social distancing , and it's allowed (on woods trails & large parks mostly).

"Lets look at our alternatives ..." is  a  proactive approach.  I know our Reviewers keep track as new information comes out every day.

I feel it would be reactive to just give up and shut everything down,  when some areas have more issues than others.

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10 hours ago, ormustr said:

I do not understand why new caches are being placed in areas where there is stay at home orders.

New caches may well have been placed a while ago, and the owner only just had time to sit down and make the page.

 

10 hours ago, ormustr said:

 The only reason we should be outside our house is for mandatory / essential travel 

Groundspeak run a worldwide cache database. Rules vary enormously from country to country, district to district. The wave of infection has progressed enormously differently, country to country, district to district. If Groundspeak had chosen one area and applied that government's rules to cope with the virus outbreak across the whole  world, that would not be appropriate to you unless you happened to live in that chosen area. Geocaching is a worldwide game. Wuhan rules , for instance, would have stopped you 'going' to that event ...
Local reviewers are intelligent humans (cue the dog jokes ... ) with local knowledge of the area they cover , I trust they will apply that local knowledge of the situation and rules,  and review caches appropriately.

 

10 hours ago, ormustr said:

 Going after a new cache is dangerous in areas of a stay at home order

If you don't think it is wise to go  out and find a cache near home , in the course of any outdoor exercise your local rules may allow , then don't go . Simple.

 

Speaking of rules , physical attendance at an event is also mandatory/essential to log it as 'attended' .

I'm not sure how you think logging as attended while not having actually attended is OK , apparently because you did it while you still could have gone out, but chose not to ?

I'd love to hear an explanation for that , please .

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34 minutes ago, hal-an-tow said:

Speaking of rules , physical attendance at an event is also mandatory/essential to log it as 'attended' .

 

The other 2/3rds thought this odd ( and she doesn't even cache  anymore   :)  ),  that a CO who didn't even show themselves would so casually take it upon themselves to work around HQ's policy.  Three options were given and  none acted on.  Sheesh...

Sad thing is we're not even surprised anymore that most fake attendees thought it a "great idea" too...

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There was an FTF just a 1/3d of a mile from my house on Thursday or Friday -- a quick walk from my house -- decided I might as well head up there.  Made the find (I think only my 10th find this year) around 7:30 a.m., and on my way back down the hill was a group of five people caching together.  I guess they had their separate cars, but it seemed ill-advised.  We chatted, albeit from a socially appropriate distance.

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Alkhalikoi said:

There was an FTF just a 1/3d of a mile from my house on Thursday or Friday -- a quick walk from my house -- decided I might as well head up there.  Made the find (I think only my 10th find this year) around 7:30 a.m., and on my way back down the hill was a group of five people caching together.  I guess they had their separate cars, but it seemed ill-advised.  We chatted, albeit from a socially appropriate distance.

 

Tired of small park loops, one popped up that I knew had varied terrain,  some elevation, and a bit more than the two miles I've been walking each day.

One car in lot, but there's a huge state park across the street, and an even bigger state game lands where I'm headed, with wide game lands trails also used by vehicles.

Saw no one the entire time in.     :)

Found the cache at 1145 (my 2nd this year) , and on the way back a truck,  and three ladies chatting "close to" the distance thing in single file, passed by.

Anyway...get to parking to see three cars and two trucks  (besides mine) now in the lot. 

 - So some of those people are bunching up on a single-track in the state park like those earlier ladies.   

I think I'll be sticking to game lands...     

 

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On 4/5/2020 at 10:23 PM, Max and 99 said:

That's the "Wait for iiiitttt" part.  It's been addressed. The good news is that 5 people, that I can tell, were actually at GZ. 

A pity that GS didn't just evaporate that entire thing. Delete the finds (and souvenirs earned from it) by everyone involved.

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