Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 4
niraD

Three ways to thank a geocache owner

Recommended Posts

Groundspeak recently published the blog post Three ways to thank a geocache owner.

 

tl;dr version:

  • Write a great log
  • Give the cache a Favorite point
  • Message them directly

 

I liked the fact that writing a great log was at the top of the list. As has been mentioned in another thread, Favorite points are nice, but most owners really appreciate a great log. I wish there was more of an explanation for what makes a great log, although I'm sure forum regulars could come up with a list.

  • Upvote 2
  • Funny 1
  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post
5 minutes ago, niraD said:

Groundspeak recently published the blog post Three ways to thank a geocache owner.

 

tl;dr version:

  • Write a great log
  • Give the cache a Favorite point
  • Message them directly

 

I liked the fact that writing a great log was at the top of the list. As has been mentioned in another thread, Favorite points are nice, but most owners really appreciate a great log. I wish there was more of an explanation for what makes a great log, although I'm sure forum regulars could come up with a list.

Write a great log is at the top of my list!

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
50 minutes ago, niraD said:

I liked the fact that writing a great log was at the top of the list.

 

Cue the "as long as someone has fun finding my cache I'm happy" counter-arguments. :P

Well, if someone writes a great log, that usually also means they had a great time finding it, so how much better is it when a geocacher shares their great experience with the CO and followup finders? Yep, a great log is top of my list too = )

  • Upvote 1
  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, niraD said:

I wish there was more of an explanation for what makes a great log, although I'm sure forum regulars could come up with a list.

To get the list of what makes a great log started, I'll suggest:

  • Tell me something about your efforts to find this specific cache. A little bit about your trip as a whole is okay for context, but the log is much less meaningful if it's all generic boilerplate that you've copy-pasted into every cache you found on that trip.
  • Upvote 4
  • Love 3

Share this post


Link to post
1 minute ago, niraD said:

To get the list of what makes a great log started, I'll suggest:

  • Tell me something about your efforts to find this specific cache. A little bit about your trip as a whole is okay for context, but the log is much less meaningful if it's all generic boilerplate that you've copy-pasted into every cache you found on that trip.

 

  • If you found a cache enjoyable, explain why. Unless you're avoiding spoilers, don't just say "this cache is great!" Say something more about the parts that made it great, whether that's a view, a clever container/puzzle, the journey, etc. Future seekers who read the logs can then get a better idea of whether they would also enjoy the cache.
  • Upvote 2
  • Helpful 4
  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post

Of course, we should probably add the disclaimer before the debate starts that "writing good logs" is not a requirements of finding geocaches. But the topic is "(three) ways to thanks a geocache owner", so these are suggestions on how to do so.  Continue... :P

  • Funny 2

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, niraD said:

Groundspeak recently published the blog post Three ways to thank a geocache owner.

tl;dr version:

  • Write a great log
  • Give the cache a Favorite point
  • Message them directly

I liked the fact that writing a great log was at the top of the list.

 

I was designated the team logger from the beginning. 

Not sure they'd be considered great, but I explain pretty-much the entire trip to get there (and back if something unusual happens).

The other 2/3rds might leave a sentence or two, and she's still the only one with a TFTC.  :)

Folks we know say they can tell by wording which of us wrote a log. They never explained (I never asked) if that was a good or bad thing...

Now that she's not caching, I'm heading to all caches that probably deserve a FP.  Eventually just by numbers I'll run out.

I tried the "message the owner" thing, and it's iffy...

A few times we got return mail that was "Don't know why you'd contact me, but... thanks",  and one came real close to "leave me the ---alone".

 - Now we send mail pertaining to caches, only to people we know.  Sometimes thank an event host too.

I still pester a coupla you in the forums once-in-a-while.   :D

  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post

I would add a fourth way:

 

Leave the cache in good or better shape than you found it. 

 

Not talking about non cache owner maintenance here, but simpler things like making sure the lid is on tight, dry out the container if it’s a bit damp, trade up or even ,etc. 

  • Upvote 2
  • Helpful 4
  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post
21 minutes ago, NightFall806 said:

But to thank a geocache owner isn't it easier to say "TFTC" or something else like that?

Well, it's certainly easier for you, yes. But it's so commonplace that, if I'm honest, I assume that anyone who logs that is simply logging as quickly as possible and doing what they think is the right thing. If you want to just write that then, sure, go ahead: that's your prerogative.

 

I'd much rather you told me something about your day, whether you enjoyed the place or the cache or something. It doesn't need to be much, but just something that's not generic is lovely to read. Sure, if you want to write something longer than that then great, but just show me you care enough to write something non-generic please.

  • Upvote 3
  • Helpful 1
  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post
10 minutes ago, Blue Square Thing said:

Well, it's certainly easier for you, yes. But it's so commonplace that, if I'm honest, I assume that anyone who logs that is simply logging as quickly as possible and doing what they think is the right thing. If you want to just write that then, sure, go ahead: that's your prerogative.

 

I'd much rather you told me something about your day, whether you enjoyed the place or the cache or something. It doesn't need to be much, but just something that's not generic is lovely to read. Sure, if you want to write something longer than that then great, but just show me you care enough to write something non-generic please.

 

Agreed. While technically "TFTC" is thanking the owner, it's the bare minimum. Think of it like being invited over for dinner, and then at the end you simply give a silent thumbs-up and walk out. If you actually enjoyed the experience, it's better to say so. It may take more time, but the owner (and other cachers) will get a much better idea of your experience and what you enjoyed* about the cache.

 

*as well as what you may not have enjoyed, which can be just as useful to communicate. Caches aren't all sunshine and rainbows, so there's no need to pretend that they are. Knowing what cachers didn't like about a cache can help the owner when hiding other caches in the future.

  • Upvote 1
  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
32 minutes ago, NightFall806 said:

But to thank a geocache owner isn't it easier to say "TFTC" or something else like that?

 

About the only information TFTC conveys to the CO and subsequent searchers is that you got the smiley and you're not entirely ungrateful for it. Did you enjoy the cache or was it just, ho hum, there's another one? If you did enjoy it, what aspects did you particularly like? That sort of thing's helpful to the CO in planning future hides. Did you have any interesting adventures or encounters along the way? Did you spot it straight away or did it take a lot of searching? Is the cache in good condition? Did you trade any swag or move any TBs?

 

I'm lucky to live in a region where most of the cachers write substantial logs, so it comes as a bit of a shock when I just get a TFTC, Found it or even just a dot. There's a cache over on the Sydney side of the bay that I adopted a year ago and it's been something of an eye-opener to the wider world as, even though the cache is in a very scenic location with a fair hike and climb to get to, most of the logs are just one or two words or TFTC.

  • Upvote 3
  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
48 minutes ago, NightFall806 said:

But to thank a geocache owner isn't it easier to say "TFTC" or something else like that?

Absolutely. Writing just "TFTC" is easier. Or as The A-Team put it, "the bare minimum".

 

The topic here is "what makes a great log", not "what makes a minimal log".

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post

Actually the topic is ways "to thank a geocache owner", not what makes a great log, so technically, "TFTC" is one :laughing:

 

But yeah, tftc is more like a technical pleasantry. It's kind of like using "Hey how's it going?" as a greeting, not as an actual question. heh

It's about as the least positive you can get in a log. Logs without something like that are the ones that seem completely oblivious to other people, if not explicitly detesting an experience. Like those "." logs. Or "found".

"TFTC" is (generally) about one tiny, tiny step past neutral towards positive.

But, then, you can never read the geocacher's mind about why they logged "tftc"; were they really thankfully? Was it just a template copy/paste? Did it actually mean something else? :)

 

tftc is barely positive and extremely vague. A very minor pleasantry.  I'd rather get 'tftc' than ".". But I'd rather read about an experience than pick apart an acronym.

Share this post


Link to post

I wonder if the difference between logs that just say TFTC & those that are a couple of sentences or more reflects the age of cachers.  In these days of text speak & Twitter we seem to have lost the skill of communication beyond minimum expression.  I am old enough to have had to write proper thank you letters & I see writing logs to be an extension of that.  When auntie had chosen a suitable gift I was taught to appreciate the effort she had made along with the expense.  When I log my finds I try to make an individual entry that expresses my thanks for the effort made by the CO.  Caching is not a "collect as many smilies as possible & move on" for me - it's primarily adding value to walks I would have done anyway.  But it does seem for many to just be a numbers game.  Which perhaps generates a "been there, found the cache, moved on, posted quick TFTC" attitude.

 

I often go back to re-read my logs as a reminder of a good day out, so by being more descriptive I am almost writing a journal for my own benefit.  And I enjoy reading other logs that have something to say about the places I visited.

  • Upvote 3
  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post

I think there's more chance that a log will be long when people use a keyboard to type up a response. It's much harder and time consuming to write informative logs on a mobile device, especially on the road.  I think the more people use smartphones only for geocaching, the less common longer logs will be.  I'm smartphone exclusive, but I use the website to compose my logs on big days. It's not often I post live from my phone, but if I do, I do tend to try to write about medium length for my habits; a couple of sentences at least, depending on the nature of the cache.

 

Point being, logging live and/or logging only on mobile devices I'd say would tendd to reduce the average log length. So yeah, the more the younger gen take up geocaching using only the smartphone app, I really think the less we'll see longer/informative logs.  (especially if the app doesn't emphasize reading descriptions first and users are more likely to see the icon and go for it without additional info)

  • Upvote 1
  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post
5 minutes ago, grimpil said:

I wonder if the difference between logs that just say TFTC & those that are a couple of sentences or more reflects the age of cachers.

 

But then there's this:

      Fam couldn't find but I did [ ! x 20]  Pumped!

 

Still makes me smile.

  • Funny 2

Share this post


Link to post

Good point re mobile logging etc.  I am one of those people who use a phone to makes calls, a camera to take photos, a GPS unit for navigating/caching & a desktop PC for typing stuff.  One day I might enter the 21st century for real . . . . but somehow have my doubts! Although I did just type this on a tablet. LOL!  

  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post

I've been working on a biking/hiking series, and keep seeing these logs.

Quote
  • My sincere apologies in advance for the "Cookie Cutter" (CC) nature of my Found-It logs for today. You see, it's unusual for this cacher to attempt a large number of smileys (icon_smile.gif) in one day, which means that my memory of each individual cache is all jumbled up with the rest. To add insult to injury, since I was bike-caching, taking notes was obviously difficult. Both hands were usually busy keeping my crash/concussion count at exactly zero.
  • J, M & I named today's group "Wednesday Caching Crew", or "WCC" for short ( much creativity, many original, so wow! ). Our trio of jovial x cachers met up at 6am (icon_smile_sleepy.gif) and carpooled the 3½ hour drive (icon_smile_shock.gif) from central x to do a buncha-buncha bike-caching along a handful of rail-trails. Weather-wise, the day's constant wind & overcast skies threatened rain during our entire outing but, thankfully, did not deliver (YAAAY!).
  • This cache was a relatively quick find, which is always a welcome event, as far as I can recall. Things at GZ were in decent shape and, unless stated otherwise elsewhere in this CC log, I took nothing, I left nothing, & we group-signed the log sheet/book with "WCC". Thank you for the cache!!!
Quote

   Three x caches set out this morning for a trip to y and xz for some bike caching. We had four bike trails loaded into the GPRs and some 100+ caches. By the end of the day, we had searched for most of the caches we had loaded but due to a construction zone, one of the trails  we had pick out was not available for us to do. The good thing about this was that this trail was the shortest of the group. 
 We did managed to get thru the other trails and found almost all of the caches that we searched for. There were a couple that were on the list although they were disabled but we looked for them anyway.
 All and all we had a fun time and after a short dinner managed to get home at a reasonable hour.

*I would like to take the time here to thank all of the cache owners that take time out of their caching time to place the cache that I found today.

Quote

Its been awhile sice i was able to go on a bike caching trip. Today i was able to get out with M and M to bike cache in x and think a part of z. We left y at 6am the weather was in the high 50's all day but no rain.We had a great time biking in parks and Bike trail. Most hides were straight forward and easy and some took us a few minutes to find. TFTC

 

The first cacher  did leave a note on some caches about the cache.  I guess if you do a hundred or so caches in a day, you don't remember any of them.  But. Id rather see TFTC.

 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post

I don't disagree with grimpil's assertion completely, but there people in all age groups who have difficulty with written communication. 

 

Just consider, when making a list of ways to write a good log as a way showing thanks to the CO, that it doesn't begin sounding like a chore.  Turn-off; tune-out; buh-bye for folks who aren't as comfortable with written communication as those who are, say, in the Forums, for example?

 

Totally agree about the Field logs.  I just don't.  Because I'm like:   T ....... h ........  i ......  s        w ......... a ...........s   !   Heck with it; I'm burning daylight here.  

An actual Draft shorthand:  Mushr; pipe; spt-on; swag: SouAirDothan--MoonPie; *NO TBs*; dry lg full; RiR overtop; pics.    :huh:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post

Try to get across your feeling and/or thoughts while your were hunting or when you found that particular cache.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post

While we're at it, let's include how to write a log for those really tough ones ... the ones that you don't particularly find appealing.

If that's ok with the OP?

Share this post


Link to post
16 minutes ago, Harry Dolphin said:

The first cacher  did leave a note on some caches about the cache.  I guess if you do a hundred or so caches in a day, you don't remember any of them.  But. Id rather see TFTC.

 

That was one of my first thoughts when I heard about folks doing hundreds in a day:  How do they remember them all; how do they log them?

 

As a CO *and* as a cacher reading logs, those looooong logs with nothing to say about the cache really are annoying.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

Lady Penelope Carrington is featured in many of my logs about certain caches.  It puts an amusing spin (I hope) on an otherwise usually rather mundane cache; helps me write my story from another angle.

 

Quote

The host - the little floozy - had that skirt hiked up way more than most, and I was concerned when I saw nothing but 4 knobby knees. As it turned out, all the important parts were still well-concealed. SL/RaF. All good here, and we thank you for this cache.

 

Edited by VAVAPAM
sample
  • Funny 3

Share this post


Link to post
52 minutes ago, grimpil said:

Good point re mobile logging etc.  I am one of those people who use a phone to makes calls, a camera to take photos, a GPS unit for navigating/caching & a desktop PC for typing stuff.  One day I might enter the 21st century for real . . . . but somehow have my doubts! Although I did just type this on a tablet. LOL!  

 

Me too (now), and that's okay.  :)  Saw on a couple of channels that there's some trying to get away from that phone. 

Stress and social sites the issues  it seems.     Actually forming groups to ditch the phone and enjoy the outdoors again.

You're already one up on 'em.     :D

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
58 minutes ago, grimpil said:

Good point re mobile logging etc.  I am one of those people who use a phone to makes calls, a camera to take photos, a GPS unit for navigating/caching & a desktop PC for typing stuff.  One day I might enter the 21st century for real . . . . but somehow have my doubts! Although I did just type this on a tablet. LOL!  

I'm starting to feel self conscious and old using my camera in public.

  • Upvote 1
  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, VAVAPAM said:

While we're at it, let's include how to write a log for those really tough ones ... the ones that you don't particularly find appealing.

If that's ok with the OP?

 

There's a cacher near here who has a TFTC code he puts at the end of each log, based on the number of exclamation marks. He used to have it spelt out in his profile but after his rewrite following the removal of html from profiles it disappeared, but from memory it went something like this:

  • TFTC! It's a smiley but I really wish I hadn't bothered
  • TFTC!! Thank you for the cache
  • TFTC!!! A nice enjoyable hide, thank you!
  • TFTC!!!! A great hide, one I thoroughly enjoyed!
  • TFTC!!!!! A fantastic hide! Will give it an FP.
  • TFTC!!!!!! This is a classic for my best-of-the-best poolroom collection!

Fortunately he's never put a TFTC! on any of mine.

Edited by barefootjeff
  • Funny 2
  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post
20 minutes ago, VAVAPAM said:

While we're at it, let's include how to write a log for those really tough ones ... the ones that you don't particularly find appealing.

If that's ok with the OP?

 

May be why the "intro" app had "That's one more find for me!" as the default.      :)

 

I used to have the log of a fun one, similar to "this was the best container I ever found at a porta potty.  thanks !"  (can't find it now...) .

  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post

I lot can be said in a few short words, and no need for full sentences either. 😁 

 

"Enjoyed the hike to the final, nice area & awesome hide, favourite point."

 

"We were excited to discover another awesome [CO] cache! Great cache container - adding a favourite point here."

 

"Great hide! Took a few minutes to enjoy the scenery before heading on home. "

 

"What a beautiful spot! Very good hint. Thanks for bringing us here!"

  • Upvote 2
  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post
1 minute ago, cerberus1 said:

"this was the best container I ever found at a porta potty.  thanks !" 

 

This is a classic!!!!!  <-refer to barefootjeff's post  😁

Share this post


Link to post
6 minutes ago, L0ne.R said:

I lot can be said in a few short words, and no need for full sentences either. 😁 

 

"Enjoyed the hike to the final, nice area & awesome hide, favourite point."

 

"We were excited to discover another awesome [CO] cache! Great cache container - adding a favourite point here."

 

"Great hide! Took a few minutes to enjoy the scenery before heading on home. "

 

"What a beautiful spot! Very good hint. Thanks for bringing us here!"

 

Exactly!

Share this post


Link to post
17 minutes ago, Max and 99 said:

I'm starting to feel self conscious and old using my camera in public.

 

Should we ever cross paths, we shall take photos with "real" cameras!

Share this post


Link to post
13 minutes ago, barefootjeff said:
  • TFTC! It's a smiley but I really wish I hadn't bothered
  • TFTC!! Thank you for the cache
  • TFTC!!! A nice enjoyable hide, thank you!
  • TFTC!!!! A great hide, one I thoroughly enjoyed!
  • TFTC!!!!! A fantastic hide! Will give it an FP.
  • TFTC!!!!!! This is a classic for my best-of-the-best poolroom collection!

Would love to steal this one!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, The A-Team said:

*as well as what you may not have enjoyed, which can be just as useful to communicate. Caches aren't all sunshine and rainbows, so there's no need to pretend that they are. Knowing what cachers didn't like about a cache can help the owner when hiding other caches in the future.

 

I saw that! ☺️

And agree 100%:  It *is* important!  Not only for future caches, but for that cache, as well.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
5 minutes ago, VAVAPAM said:
2 hours ago, The A-Team said:

*as well as what you may not have enjoyed, which can be just as useful to communicate. Caches aren't all sunshine and rainbows, so there's no need to pretend that they are. Knowing what cachers didn't like about a cache can help the owner when hiding other caches in the future.

 

I saw that! ☺️

And agree 100%:  It *is* important!  Not only for future caches, but for that cache, as well.

 

This is about the only time I've really let fly in a log (a DNF). It turned out my GPSr was about five metres out, leading me into the stagnant, smelly, oily and likely toxic waste pool just behind the mound on which the cache was sitting. I suppose I was already in a bad mood, having DNFed another cache three times that week, and had thought this new D2/T2 would be a bit easier:

 

Quote

Please tell me my GPSr is broken, because it put GZ on the edge of an obnoxious mullock heap amongst rusty car parts and a cairn to a fuel pump or something. Who knows what toxic waste is buried under it? If the smells coming out of the strange rubber pipes poking out the side are anything to go by, I'll probably wake up tomorrow with three arms and two heads. I couldn't see any plausible hiding place for a cache, unobvious or not, although given that it's been found, it must be there I suppose.

After calling it quits, I saw two other people approaching. Thinking they must be fellow cachers, I waved to them, but they turned out to be dog-walkers and their oh-so-friendly pooch decided to rub its wet slimy coat all over my clothes - it had obviously been swimming in one of the wet slimy ex-quarry water holes.

Sorry to vent, but not a pleasant experience I'm afraid.

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, The A-Team said:

*as well as what you may not have enjoyed, which can be just as useful to communicate. Caches aren't all sunshine and rainbows, so there's no need to pretend that they are. Knowing what cachers didn't like about a cache can help the owner when hiding other caches in the future.

 

Yep, that's why I never say "positive logs", just "good logs", as in informative and useful, relevant :)
 

 

21 minutes ago, L0ne.R said:

I lot can be said in a few short words, and no need for full sentences either. 😁

"Enjoyed the hike to the final, nice area & awesome hide, favourite point."

"We were excited to discover another awesome [CO] cache! Great cache container - adding a favourite point here."

"Great hide! Took a few minutes to enjoy the scenery before heading on home. "

"What a beautiful spot! Very good hint. Thanks for bringing us here!" 

 

I don't think it's a bad idea to have boilerplate templates for various common experiences while caching. At least it shows a bit of conscious thought in selected an appropriate one :) it's relevant to the cache. Now if I knew that you use the same text for general caching, and then there's an actually amazing cache with a huge experience and everyone loves it, then you use that quick short sentence boilerplate, well then, that all goes out the window. :P

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
11 minutes ago, barefootjeff said:

Please tell me my GPSr is broken, because it put GZ on the edge of an obnoxious mullock heap...

Well, I must say, you were eloquent in your disgust!

 

I had a similarly disgusting experience - admittedly not that bad! - and did record it in my log as warning that summertime was not the best time to attempt it ... unless you were great at holding your breath!

 

So really, great logs are as much about communicating with the CO as they are about communicating with the cachers yet to visit.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post

 

Quote

  

1 hour ago, Harry Dolphin said:

The first cacher  did leave a note on some caches about the cache.  I guess if you do a hundred or so caches in a day, you don't remember any of them.  But. Id rather see TFTC.

 

That was one of my first thoughts when I heard about folks doing hundreds in a day:  How do they remember them all; how do they log them?

 

I must be very unusual.  I just did a Cache Machine a couple of weeks ago, found 75 caches but didn't write the logs for a couple of days.  I could remember every one of the caches enough to write a personal log about each.  Many years ago we did a cross-Canada trip with 183 caches found, after we got home I was able to recall all but one those caches (and that one is a complete blank, even looking at track logs/maps/etc.) when writing the logs.  Of course, very few of the caches were identical/very similar so there was little to confuse about them - I'm not sure how I'd do on a long power trail...

  • Surprised 2

Share this post


Link to post

I've taken to carrying a small (5x7) spiral notebook with me in the field. It fits nicely in a jacket, cargo, or back pocket and a pen with a decent clip fits in the spiral giving me a backup cache signing utensil. I can track my finds/DNFs/NMs, plan my targets ahead, write down EC/VC answers, and make shorthand memory-jogging notes for writing logs back home.

  • Upvote 1
  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
6 minutes ago, JL_HSTRE said:

I've taken to carrying a small (5x7) spiral notebook with me in the field. It fits nicely in a jacket, cargo, or back pocket and a pen with a decent clip fits in the spiral giving me a backup cache signing utensil. I can track my finds/DNFs/NMs, plan my targets ahead, write down EC/VC answers, and make shorthand memory-jogging notes for writing logs back home.

 

I nearly always have a camera with me, usually just the camera in the phone but if I'm expecting some interesting scenery I'll lug along the DSLR as well. I take photos of anything memorable along the way, as well as around GZ, so that when I get home to write up my log, I can use the photos to jog my memory as well as attach the best of them. After all, don't they say a picture paints a thousand words?

  • Upvote 1
  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post

Perhaps taking photos at/from/around a cache location that enjoys good views, interesting background features etc then uploading to the cache page is another way to show appreciation to the CO.  Not only says "hey! I found this great place that I may not have discovered if I wasn't caching" but also shows future cachers why they should maybe head for that spot. 

 

As for carrying an actual camera - I find I get into conversation with other people so equipped, but not with phone camera users.  Have no sense of inferiority because I use a traditional camera (usually compact zoom, sometimes DSLR).  Perhaps I am old fashioned, but am one of those people who hung on to their vinyl music collection & now find myself a trendsetter.

 

When it comes to thanking the CO I even try to say something positive about my DNFs - "great location, nice walk to here, probably me being totally doh! etc".  Hiding & maintaning caches is obviously time consuming & at some cost to the CO so any acknowledgement beyond "." is perhaps a bonus.

  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post
12 hours ago, thebruce0 said:

but I use the website to compose my logs on big days. It's not often I post live from my phone, but if I do, I do tend to try to write about medium length for my habits; a couple of sentences at least, depending on the nature of the cache.

 

I have only posted my logs a few time from my phone while out caching and it was this past weekend, as I was working on the new promotion.  I managed to get the 6 caches needed for the 2nd part but since it was a requirement to have those 6 logged before I could look for the other 15 in part 3, I had to log in the field, which I really don't like doing, preferring to write once I get home, even if it's a week later.  However, I posted my logs with something like - "Place holder for new promotion, longer log later" - and then sent the CO a message, letting him know I didn't intend to do it this way and would update the logs once I had the time.  I finished up that late afternoon and had time that night to update the logs and sent him a message, letting him know that they had been edited.  I got an email the next morning from the CO, thanking me for messaging him and letting him know as he only saw my quick blurb rather than the write ups I ended up doing.

 

As with caches (and FPs), great logs are in the eyes of the beholder.  I'd like to hear about their experiences (good and bad) while they were doing my cache.  I don't mind a negative experience because it lets me know that something may have happened to my cache that wasn't supposed to happen or it lets me know that perhaps my idea wasn't as good as I thought it was.  I generally don't get LOTS of logs, as my caches tend to be found intermittently, so I don't get lots of TFTC or cut and paste logs.  In fact, since this promotion started, I've only gotten one find on any of my caches.  However, it was a really good log (not great) with some thought put into it.  

 

11 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

There's a cacher near here who has a TFTC

 

I always start with a TFTC and then go from there.

 

11 hours ago, L0ne.R said:

"Enjoyed the hike to the final, nice area & awesome hide, favourite point."

 

"We were excited to discover another awesome [CO] cache! Great cache container - adding a favourite point here."

 

"Great hide! Took a few minutes to enjoy the scenery before heading on home. "

 

"What a beautiful spot! Very good hint. Thanks for bringing us here!"

 

These are really good logs but not ones I'd consider great.  I'll add some extra detail about the hike, the ammo can being in a neat spot, the contents being in great shape (especially if it's been awhile since the last find), how much I enjoy the CO's hides, the views along the way (even a photo like I did with a recent cache in Gatlinburg when I was up early enough to catch the sunrise over the town), if there were any creatures I encountered, or any other variety of things that occurred on the way there and back.  Sometimes some of the neatest things have happened to me as I was returning to my car from the cache, which I will relate if I felt it was warranted.  One time, on a rather mundane hide in a cemetery, a local community resident, whose family had been on their land for generations, filled me in on his family's history, pointing out family members interred in the cemetery.  He and I spent a good 15 minutes talking and geocaching wasn't even the topic that was raised, other than the initial reason for me being in the old cemetery in the first place.  I made sure to mention that in my log and gave it a FP for the interaction with the local resident.

 

4 hours ago, grimpil said:

When it comes to thanking the CO I even try to say something positive about my DNFs

 

They're usually shorter in nature but I do the same as well.  Most of the time it will describe my main search area so that if the CO reads it, they'll know if I was in the right area or not and then have a good idea if it's MIA or not.  I also usually give a reason for my DNF.  Pine tree hides, for me, are either really quick or a dragged out affair.  I haven't figured out how or why; they just are so I let the CO know my struggle!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
11 hours ago, The Jester said:

I must be very unusual.  I just did a Cache Machine a couple of weeks ago, found 75 caches but didn't write the logs for a couple of days.  I could remember every one of the caches enough to write a personal log about each.  Many years ago we did a cross-Canada trip with 183 caches found, after we got home I was able to recall all but one those caches (and that one is a complete blank, even looking at track logs/maps/etc.) when writing the logs.  Of course, very few of the caches were identical/very similar so there was little to confuse about them - I'm not sure how I'd do on a long power trail...

 

Yep, same. If it's a full day of individual caches, at least the vast majority of them I'll remember, especially after re-checking the listing or location on the map.  Long power trails of identical hides is a different beast altogether. First, it's unlikely the CO is reading every single log or expecting to see unique interesting logs for each, but rather the entire trail was intended as one experience so often expects mini-copy/paste logs for all but maybe a couple. Second, if there's anything I want to remember I'll make a note in my field notes so I can add it when I compose.

But a full day of very different geocaches? With a few minor exceptions, each of them I'll be able to remember.

 

 

5 hours ago, grimpil said:

Perhaps taking photos at/from/around a cache location that enjoys good views, interesting background features etc then uploading to the cache page is another way to show appreciation to the CO.  Not only says "hey! I found this great place that I may not have discovered if I wasn't caching" but also shows future cachers why they should maybe head for that spot. 

 

heh, I keep telling myself after a long day of finds and photos that I'll go back over the logs and add the photos I think are worth sharing, and keep forgetting. They tend to go on social media first. I need to get back on that... that's one of the downfalls of the field note and compose mentality.  If you compose on desktop, you have to remember to add photos from your device (directly or after unloading them) afterwards. Or change up how you log them.

 

46 minutes ago, coachstahly said:

I have only posted my logs a few time from my phone while out caching and it was this past weekend, as I was working on the new promotion.  I managed to get the 6 caches needed for the 2nd part but since it was a requirement to have those 6 logged before I could look for the other 15 in part 3, I had to log in the field, which I really don't like doing, preferring to write once I get home, even if it's a week later.

 

I've been logging live as well, and with that, skipping my TB visits. I just find it easier to edit the logs in order in batch and 'visit' my personal TBs. And likewise with adding photos. Don't really have an issue with that. If it's a great cache I'll do the editing update as well.  But personally if I know I'm putting a placeholder log text, I'll add in the text that I'm editing it when the day's done to provide a better log.

 

Being compelled to mobile log with this promo is one of the (very minor, imo) drawbacks of this mechanic of unlocking the next level first to see requirements. Probably wouldn't be as big a deal if each level were at least a day's worth of average geocaching. But level 1 and 2, maybe 3, are fairly easily done by most people in a day. Plus there's something nice about seeing the immediate reward for the log :) But that's something the devs should keep in mind.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
13 hours ago, JL_HSTRE said:

I've taken to carrying a small (5x7) spiral notebook with me in the field. It fits nicely in a jacket, cargo, or back pocket and a pen with a decent clip fits in the spiral giving me a backup cache signing utensil. I can track my finds/DNFs/NMs, plan my targets ahead, write down EC/VC answers, and make shorthand memory-jogging notes for writing logs back home.

 

Another use for that notebook:  Once, pre-phonecaching, I picked up a Travel Bug and carried it for the day. Late in the afternoon, I dropped it in my last find of the day.

 

On the drive home, it occurred to me that since I had dropped it, I didn't have the TB code for either the Grab OR the Drop!!!!

 

I read a Find log on that second cache a few days later from a guy who said that he picked up the rogue TB. I contacted him and convinced him that I had had the thing in my hands and never wrote down the number. He could see my Find logs on the two caches, so he gave me the code. I posted the Grab AND the Drop, dated earlier than his "Grab From Somewhere Else" log, but I think I remember that there was some difficulty in logging them out of order and having it still registered as being in his inventory.

 

Wish I had written down that code!

Share this post


Link to post

Yeah for TBs the owner can recalculate, so if logs get posted out of order it doesn't matter. At worst, logs can be deleted and re-added (again by editing logs on cache listings you can re-apply TB activity as on the log date rather than posting new cache logs like Notes that some people still have a habit of doing :) )

You can even post logs that don't quite make sense in date order on the BT summary, just so the TB sits in the right place to post the right logs.  Do the 'clean up' of logs afterwards and you can still end up with the proper process of grab/drop logs!

Share this post


Link to post

I agree that cachers who have only used the app probably have a tendency to treat geocaching differently. I suppose that without going on the website, they could look at it as just a quick app, and not understand the community aspect or a lot of the guidelines (this is just a guess).

 

However, I'm not sure how much I agree about how the app or using a phone would make the logs shorter. With us "old" people, typing on a phone can seem to be a bit of a struggle. But I would think younger people would be used to it. My daughter will send me these hugely long texts. I don't know how or why she does it. I call them her "books". We've seen her typing on her phone, she types so fast her fingers are like a blur. :o

 

At first, I was very against using my phone to post logs. But I have a problem with not logging later if I wait. So I've been trying harder to log using the app on my phone. I've found that it's actually not that hard to post a medium sized log. I've been appreciating the rest in my air conditioned car while I log a cache before heading to another one. Dang heat and humidity! I probably wouldn't be caching right now, but I'm sorta working on the Mystery at the Museum.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post

Yep, I'm the same way. I will occasionally post longer logs by phone. My point wasn't that everyone does :) Just that it's likely more common with this current digital and mobile culture that logs will be shorter on average by people only post by mobile device than by those who prefer to create logs using a keyboard, which is much much convenient for lengthy text.

And likewise, there's no guarantee that people who compose by keyboard will submit longer more informative logs, of course! lol

Share this post


Link to post
7 minutes ago, thebruce0 said:

Yep, I'm the same way. I will occasionally post longer logs by phone. My point wasn't that everyone does :) Just that it's likely more common with this current digital and mobile culture that logs will be shorter on average by people only post by mobile device than by those who prefer to create logs using a keyboard, which is much much convenient for lengthy text.

And likewise, there's no guarantee that people who compose by keyboard will submit longer more informative logs, of course! lol

 

It's probably a bit relative. Just because people can post longer logs on the app or a keyboard, doesn't mean they won't. I get so curious about why people do what they do, and would like to know statistics. I wish there was some way to be able to do that, but the info that is out there is so subjective.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post

There are definitely some cachers who simply can't think of much to say about their finds. I've met some.

 

But at this point any log that is more than an acronym or copy & paste text is essentially a compliment, especially longer than one sentence. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 4

×
×
  • Create New...