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aolszowka

Need Help Identifying

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I can't seem to find this in any of the Bench Mark Databases I've searched; reading the FAQ here: https://www.geocaching.com/mark/#whynotin is this something that was not "bluebooked"?

 

N 45 19.168

W 109 56.174

 

We found it up near "Sioux Charley Lake" a pretty popular hike around these parts.

 

Thank you

DSC04646.jpg

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aolszowka,

 

No PID on this one, but I believe there is one bearing 060° about 20 miles just across MT 78 from the new high-school which survived the even newer road work.  kayakbird

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Hi All,

 

A bit of information concerning USGS survey monuments in Montana that do have a PID.   [Note:  based on running Excel data sorts that came from the GSAK that I downloaded back in the dark ages.]  722 of the 15911PIDs were set by USGS.  24 of these are in Stillwater County - 22 Tri's and just 2 elevation Benchmarks. 

 

I logged and recovered BM QW0344  in 2009; but have no record of looking for the nearby QW0345.  Might have to try for it next week on a family visit.  MEL

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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), an agency in the Dept. of the Interior has the responsibility for producing our national topographic maps. They completed the monumental task of complete national mapping of the 1:24,000 scale map series (about 55,000 maps) in the early 1990's. USGS would often set survey monuments to help "control" the map. Maps are produced from aeronautical photos mosaiced together. In order to provide accurate location, orientation, scale and elevation to a flat map of a curved surface, it is required to have numerous points that can be identified on the photographs for which the coordinates/elevations are well known. The marks set by USGS were a vital part of this operation. In the days when mapping surveys were conducted primarily by line-of-site methods, these marks helped save money by helping to ensure a network that cartographers could rely on for mapping update procedures. With the rapid developments in surveying and mapping technology, especially GPS, USGS sees little need to setting new marks or maintaining the old networks. Unfortunately the data for tens of thousands of these marks set by USGS were never submitted to NGS for inclusion in the National Spatial Reference System. Due to major reductions in staff and the changing nature of mapping requirements, it is highly unlikely that USGS will ever automate these data.

 

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