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ThedoctorNC

Where to get good geocache containers

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There are lots of places to get good geocache containers, but the best container will still be ineffective if it's not placed in the right spot.  You can have an ammo can (one of the best still out there, IMO) but if it's on the side of a well-used trail and not hidden well (and able to be replaced just as well), you're going to have to replace it and that can get expensive.  Ammo cans can be found (sometimes) at Army/Navy surplus stores, places like Tractor Supply Company (and other similar rural stores), and occasionally friends.  Prices on those are much higher than when I started, so beware.  Lock-n-lock or similar (snap lock containers, not ones with lids that seal to the shape of the container), can be found at big stores like Target, Meijer, Walmart, etc... as well as online.  Matchstick containers are decent but once that o-ring deteriorates, it will be hard to keep things dry.  Walmart has them for 1$ in the hunting section.  Bison tubes can be found online and occasionally in the medicine aisles of a drugstore (marketed as waterproof pill fobs) but they're more expensive.  

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Wide mouth water bottles are decent smalls. And can often be found in big box stores.  These are bottles WITHOUT a small snap opening in the lid. Solid lid, wide mouth.

I use ammo cans mostly. I buy in bulk, when I can get them home at under ~ $6.50 each.   They're subject to theft, more so than other containers.

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If you want a big container that will stay dry, surplus metal ammo cans are great.  Your local military surplus store may have some.  Or if you know anyone who works in military supply, they may be able to get you some excess.  There's usually a pile on any given base/National Guard armory/Reserve center.

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2 hours ago, Goldenwattle said:

How wide? Like a cup or mug?

 

Wide enough for a log to come out easily.  Ones that taper at the top too much make it hard for swag and logs to slide right out.  

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4 hours ago, RuideAlmeida said:

Lock&Lock are always a wise choice... easy to find in supermarkets.

 

They are my go-to choice.

 

ThedoctorNC, they have to be the authentic kind, not the knock-offs. The knock-offs don't last long enough and most are not water-tight--the gasket and tabs don't seal as well.

Look for the Lock&Lock symbol embossed on the lid and on the bottom of the container. 

You can get authentic Lock & Locks on Amazon.com (3 for $9), (2 for $6).

 

205153d35e14de1b588dd278c25ff4f4.jpg

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45 minutes ago, L0ne.R said:

ThedoctorNC, they have to be the authentic kind, not the knock-offs. The knock-offs don't last long enough and most are not water-tight--the gasket and tabs don't seal as well.

 

They do NOT need to be authentic, despite what you've said above.  Perhaps in your experiences you've come to this conclusion but in mine, I have found that the "knock-offs" are just as reliable as the name brand.  I've used both types and there's no noticeable difference in their shelf life out in nature.  Just make sure that they have a gasket and lock tabs, not sliding tabs or the type of container that seals based on the shape of the container.  Cheaper does not always mean lower quality and more expensive doesn't always mean better.

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45 minutes ago, coachstahly said:

 

They do NOT need to be authentic, despite what you've said above.  Perhaps in your experiences you've come to this conclusion but in mine, I have found that the "knock-offs" are just as reliable as the name brand.  I've used both types and there's no noticeable difference in their shelf life out in nature.  Just make sure that they have a gasket and lock tabs, not sliding tabs or the type of container that seals based on the shape of the container.  Cheaper does not always mean lower quality and more expensive doesn't always mean better.

 

Yes, 16 years of geocaching and I've come to that conclusion. I've seen a LOT of broken knock-offs that were less then a year old. Some not broken but the contents were in bad shape because the flimsy structure of the dollar store container did not keep water out. For a couple more dollars, a cacher can get a better quality container that will do a better job. Can you suggest a good knock-off with a proven track record? 

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59 minutes ago, L0ne.R said:

Can you suggest a good knock-off with a proven track record? 

 

Based on my personal experiences over 10 years, I have three different types that have worked as well as Lock-n-locks.  I've used Sistema for a few (newer - past 5 years -  to the market where I am) and they seem to be holding up pretty well.  I've not used them more than a couple years so I can't tell you about their long term viability.  I've used Pop It brand containers and Snapware, which all seem to be doing well.  I replaced one last month after 4 years and it was still relatively dry inside but the gasket had become loose and was pinched when it was closed by the last finder.  I used lock-n-lock for my larger size containers (easier to find at the store than off brands) of a series and found they didn't last any longer than the knock off brand I replaced them with when they started letting water in the container.  Based on the container, some were replaced with Lock-n-locks while others were replaced with something else that fit what I needed.

 

I've found Lock-n-Locks that were missing tabs and had messed up gaskets, so it's not limited only to knock off brands.  You have one that works for you and I have found others that work for me.  I'm not disputing the fact that lock-n-locks work - they do, but they don't do so at a noticeably different level when compared to some other brands that are similar in nature.  I have also found a few brands that don't work as well, despite their claims to the contrary - Rubbermaid, Sterilite, and OXO come to mind.

 

Insisting that these HAVE to be lock-n-lock brands seems to be saying that they're the only containers that will do.  @fizzymagic will dispute your claims that they're consistently reliable containers as well.  The ONLY container I've found to be as good as advertised is an ammo can but I'm not going to tell a new cacher that it MUST be an ammo can that should be placed.  They're more expensive and for a newer cacher who might not be fully vested into this activity, it's probably not worth the initial expense to put out a hide (first one?) that might get taken.  If they wanted to do an ammo can I'd tell them to look at the plastic ones but would caution them that I've found some that were filled with water and others, out in the middle of nowhere, that were just as dry as a metal ammo can.

 

Regardless of the container, in 4 climate zones almost all of the containers will need some sort of replacement/refreshing.  Most of my small or larger containers are ground level, very little sun exposure, and some water exposure, although I try to limit it whenever possible.  There's been very little difference in the duration of snap containers I've used (with some notable exceptions listed above), with the "knock-off" brands lasting about the same length of time as the lock-n-lock brand.  The only things I have out that are dry as the day I placed them are my ammo cans.  I've had to replace/refresh every type of container I've used, with the sole exception of the ammo cans.

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6 minutes ago, coachstahly said:

I've used Sistema for a few (newer - past 5 years -  to the market where I am) and they seem to be holding up pretty well.  I've not used them more than a couple years so I can't tell you about their long term viability.

 

The Sistema clip-lock containers (made in New Zealand) are widely used in Australia and survive very well if protected from direct sunlight. Here's one I found recently that was hidden in 2005 in a tree stump, still the original container with the original bone-dry logbook.

 

DSC_0430.jpg.6409945bc67b33d4fd46c82443818f8d.jpgDSC_0429.jpg.f222c043570bc8aa59428287e22609e4.jpg

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7 hours ago, L0ne.R said:

 

They are my go-to choice.

 

ThedoctorNC, they have to be the authentic kind, not the knock-offs. The knock-offs don't last long enough and most are not water-tight--the gasket and tabs don't seal as well.

Look for the Lock&Lock symbol embossed on the lid and on the bottom of the container. 

You can get authentic Lock & Locks on Amazon.com (3 for $9), (2 for $6).

 

205153d35e14de1b588dd278c25ff4f4.jpg

The most common type used in Australia are known as sistema, but there are other brands too.

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7 hours ago, coachstahly said:

 

Wide enough for a log to come out easily.  Ones that taper at the top too much make it hard for swag and logs to slide right out.  

And TBs will fit in easily?

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11 minutes ago, Goldenwattle said:

And TBs will fit in easily?

Usually the opening is a little smaller than the diameter of the bottle, but not much smaller. Here's a photo:

75934115-1f19-47f5-baf4-8b6342ef6c3d.jpg

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35 minutes ago, niraD said:

Usually the opening is a little smaller than the diameter of the bottle, but not much smaller. Here's a photo:

75934115-1f19-47f5-baf4-8b6342ef6c3d.jpg

Definitely not a favourite type of cache. Dislike those shaped openings. I wouldn't use one. I asked the questions, because I was wondering what size it would be classified. If a TB/geocoin won't it easily through the opening, I rate a cache a micro.

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1 hour ago, Goldenwattle said:
2 hours ago, niraD said:

Usually the opening is a little smaller than the diameter of the bottle, but not much smaller. Here's a photo:

75934115-1f19-47f5-baf4-8b6342ef6c3d.jpg

Definitely not a favourite type of cache. Dislike those shaped openings. I wouldn't use one. I asked the questions, because I was wondering what size it would be classified. If a TB/geocoin won't it easily through the opening, I rate a cache a micro.

Geocoins and TB tags fit inside that cache just fine. Whether an actual TB would fit depends on how big the thing is that the TB tag is attached to. But the bottle itself is about 3.5 inches diameter, and the lid is about 2.5 inches diameter.

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18 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

The Sistema clip-lock containers (made in New Zealand) are widely used in Australia and survive very well if protected from direct sunlight.

 

I think that's the key.  Lock and lock containers, be they brand name or otherwise, are not designed to sit outside as geocaches and withstand the elements.  The plastic can be degraded by UV exposure.

 

18 hours ago, coachstahly said:

The ONLY container I've found to be as good as advertised is an ammo can but I'm not going to tell a new cacher that it MUST be an ammo can that should be placed.

 

I agree, both on quality and that they can cost a little more.  I can think of a handful of ammo cans that have leaked inside out of hundreds I've come across.  Even this one was dry inside when we found it, though it certainly looked bad on the outside.

 

427c0879-262a-46f2-9d79-2fd70b87e327.jpg

 

Most of the time, it was because the lid wasn't sealing due to dirt or foreign objects like a stray piece of swag or pine needles.  A couple had dry rotted seals that just gave out.  One or two had rusted out along the hinges. Two had been damaged by forest fires, one partly, the other was, well, roasted.  (As opposed to a lock and lock, which would have  melted and burned.)

 

3fc56331-a8db-4bbf-8281-87a9c13657c7.jpg

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As mentioned by myself and others, even "authentic" Lock-n-lock containers do not last well.  It's a design flaw that the tabs' hinges are created from thin sections of the lid plastic.  And this kind of plastic (polypropylene), even in the "special" Lock-n-lock formula, is notoriously susceptible to UV radiation and temperature variations. 

 

The Sistema containers are much better than Lock-n-locks as they do not have the design flaw of the hinges made of thinner plastic, but they can still degrade with UV exposure.

 

Metal ammo cans are the best containers.  By far,

 

I don't mind preforms; for whatever reason, I have yet to run into one where the cap has degraded significantly.

 

Bison tubes can be OK, especially in dry areas where losing the O-ring does not make the log wet. I recommend waterproof log sheets for all cache containers.

 

Pill bottles are entirely unacceptable as geocache containers.  Period.

 

Disposable food-storage containers are likewise completely unacceptable.

 

I've seen some well-crafted outlet-cover types of containers, which are acceptable if put in a place where they are clearly not real.  But those inevitably have a zip bag for the log, which I absolutely detest.

Edited by fizzymagic
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On 1/14/2019 at 8:30 AM, L0ne.R said:

 

They are my go-to choice.

 

ThedoctorNC, they have to be the authentic kind, not the knock-offs. The knock-offs don't last long enough and most are not water-tight--the gasket and tabs don't seal as well.

Look for the Lock&Lock symbol embossed on the lid and on the bottom of the container. 

You can get authentic Lock & Locks on Amazon.com (3 for $9), (2 for $6).

 

205153d35e14de1b588dd278c25ff4f4.jpg

 

Those are all unacceptable containers, in my (rather extensive) experience.  They will be trash in a couple of years.  If you are going to complain about others' choice of containers, it behooves you to use quality ones for your own caches.

Edited by fizzymagic
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1 hour ago, fizzymagic said:

 

Those are all unacceptable containers, in my (rather extensive) experience.  They will be trash in a couple of years.  If you are going to complain about others' choice of containers, it behooves you to use quality ones for your own caches.

 

It all depends on where the cache is hidden, and I suppose to a lesser extent how many visitors it's likely to get. Most of my hides are tucked away under rock ledges or in wind-eroded sandstone caves where they're well protected from both sun and rain, so just about anything will last well. My most troublesome hides have been in spots subject to flash flooding in extreme rainfall events, where buoyant containers have floated away (and yes, a metal ammo can is buoyant unless it's heavily weighted down). As a replacement for a Sistema I lost that way, I used a steel cash box with two of the largest fishing sinkers I could buy glued inside - its volume is 1.3 litres and its mass, with the sinkers, is 1.4kg so it's just heavy enough not to be buoyant and survived the most recent flood without moving.

 

DSC_0220.jpg.d641a039d30178f337420a1193faf970.jpg

 

Its hiding place is deep inside a rock cavity in the bank of a creek, normally a couple of metres above water level so usually high and dry. Its log is one of the "Tradie" brand of waterproof stone paper spiral-bound notebooks so it's not damaged if a bit of water seeps inside during a flood.

 

It's also worth remembering (depending where you are) that anything made of plain steel (including ammo cans) will rust fairly quickly if exposed to salt water even if it's just sea spray.

Edited by barefootjeff

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1 hour ago, barefootjeff said:

anything made of plain steel (including ammo cans) will rust fairly quickly if exposed to salt water even if it's just sea spray.

How about a mintie tin with magnet stuck on the underside of a low bridge over seawater. Some people just don't think...or are incapable of it.

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On 1/13/2019 at 8:18 PM, ThedoctorNC said:

Hi! I want to know good places to get good geocache containers. Thanks geocache community!

Have you looked at the ones sold on the Geocaching website, or just used Google to find other sellers?

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7 hours ago, fizzymagic said:

 

Those are all unacceptable containers, in my (rather extensive) experience.  They will be trash in a couple of years.  If you are going to complain about others' choice of containers, it behooves you to use quality ones for your own caches.

 

6 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

 

It all depends on where the cache is hidden, and I suppose to a lesser extent how many visitors it's likely to get... <snip>

 

The point that it depends on where the cache is hidden is really significant. That applies to different parts of the world as much as anything else.

 

In my part of the UK we don't generally have a large extreme of temperatures and it's generally mild and fairly damp. The sort of container which will work here might well be different to the sort that might work well in other parts of the world.

 

For me, lock and lock containers are proving reliable enough. I tend to check on each one on a regular enough basis that I can deal with any problems before they become an issue - so I checked on one I hid in 2015 yesterday and it was perfectly dry inside and the outside showed no signs of degradation. But it's hidden in the sort of place that will suit that sort of container, whereas rusty ammo cans in the same sort of woodland location here seem to become very hard to open.

 

Lock and lock are also, frankly, cheap enough that they can be replaced if necessary - which is a factor that needs to come into play I think as does any intention with regard to the projected life-span of a cache. Not everyone hides things for the super-longterm and some people rotate caches on a fairly regular basis. Not my ideal, but it happens.

 

So, to the OP - it sort of depends.

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38 minutes ago, Blue Square Thing said:

The point that it depends on where the cache is hidden is really significant. That applies to different parts of the world as much as anything else.

I found a cache in Coober Pedy, broken into two parts. This cache was in the open under the thin canopy of a tree. It appears the cache might have been broken for awhile. The log and contents were in good condition, because it hardly rains in Coober Pedy.

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9 hours ago, fizzymagic said:

I don't mind preforms; for whatever reason, I have yet to run into one where the cap has degraded significantly.

 

 

I have, especially in New Mexico, where PET preforms are often hung in mesquite bushes without much shade protection.  Fortunately, it's pretty easy to replace a PET preform cap with one from your preference of choice.

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9 hours ago, fizzymagic said:

Those are all unacceptable containers, in my (rather extensive) experience.  They will be trash in a couple of years.  If you are going to complain about others' choice of containers, it behooves you to use quality ones for your own caches.

 

They're good only for a LIMITED time before they need to be replaced.  I think that's an important distinction to make.  They will be trash in a couple of years.  They need to be checked regularly to head off any issues, which is sometimes more maintenance than COs are willing to offer.  The ones I have out are all close enough that I can usually make the trip out there to replace it when it's gotten to the point it needs to be replaced.  How they're hidden also impacts their durability.  Exposure to the sun degrades the material and the tabs, as noted, will eventually break, rendering the container useless.  However, for a period of time they can work well enough but they will most certainly need replacement at some point in time.  If you want minimal maintenance and exceptional duration, the only container I've found to work is the ammo can. Even the worst containers are good for a period of time but the majority of the containers cachers put out aren't set them and leave them types of containers.  They ALL require checks, some much more frequently and earlier than others.

 

Bison tubes and even preforms can have issues in my area.  Bison tubes and their o-rings (as mentioned) are the main issue and will need either an o-ring replacement or a full container replacement once the o-ring deteriorates.  Preforms in my area, for whatever reason, have a tendency to get gnawed on by various critters.  Not all of them but enough that it's a noticeable thing here in the Ohio Valley region of the states.  I have not noticed any natural cap degradation however.

 

The question then becomes, as a CO, "How often are you wanting to go out to perform maintenance on the caches you hide?".  

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I want to know if people put logs inside pill bottles, then the pill bottle inside a bigger container.  I think this "double container" will result in more dry logsheets.  

Comments?

Edited by IMaCheesehead
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Just now, IMaCheesehead said:

I want to know if people put logs inside pill bottles, then the pill bottle inside a bigger container.  I think this "double container" will result in more dry logsheets.  

Comments?

I have done this. In my case there is a field puzzle (lock picking) involved to retreive the pill bottle. I modified the pill bottle by placing a length of PVC pipe in it to make extraction of the log easy. Also, with the log being inside the pill bottle, a finder cannot bypass the field puzzle, which itself is inside another container.

Logs are notoriously difficult to extract from narrow mouth pill bottles, hence the pvc tube.

Having said that, the log could be placed in a baggy but, in my experience, pill bottles are no more waterproof than a baggie but it would last a bit longer.

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23 minutes ago, IMaCheesehead said:

I want to know if people put logs inside pill bottles, then the pill bottle inside a bigger container. 

I think this "double container" will result in more dry logsheets.  Comments?

 

We thought about something similar once.

  - But rationalized that if damp logs were ever an issue, we could  simply use better containers from the get-go . :)

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35 minutes ago, IMaCheesehead said:

I want to know if people put logs inside pill bottles, then the pill bottle inside a bigger container.  I think this "double container" will result in more dry logsheets.  

Comments?

 

If you have to put the pill bottle inside another container, why do you need the pill bottle?

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8 hours ago, K13 said:

 

If you have to put the pill bottle inside another container, why do you need the pill bottle?

 

Nearly all of my caches are ‘double-potted’, generally a 35mm film pot for the log, inside a larger container.  Some are still micros, only just big enough for the film pot.  Definitely better than plastic bags for keeping a log dry if the outer container fails for any reason.  And easier to open than plastic bags too. 🙂

Edited by IceColdUK
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11 hours ago, IMaCheesehead said:

I want to know if people put logs inside pill bottles, then the pill bottle inside a bigger container.  I think this "double container" will result in more dry logsheets.  

Comments?

 

While I've seen it done in the manner you mention, more double containers are hidden with a smaller medical screw top medical tube inside a pre-form.  Sometimes it's a diabetes test strip container inside a small container.  However, that's not common practice here in my area.

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Thanks for your comments.  I have decided that my primary container will always be better or best quality.  I will put logs inside a secondary pill bottle if there is room.  I ordered heavy duty ziplock bags, 4mill, from Plymor on Amazon.   They will go inside the preforms i ordered.  (And to clean up soggy caches i find. )  

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On 1/15/2019 at 8:20 PM, fizzymagic said:

As mentioned by myself and others, even "authentic" Lock-n-lock containers do not last well.  It's a design flaw that the tabs' hinges are created from thin sections of the lid plastic.  And this kind of plastic (polypropylene), even in the "special" Lock-n-lock formula, is notoriously susceptible to UV radiation and temperature variations. 

Sadly, as someone who's put a lot of these in the field over the years (and have quite a few ready to go), I have to agree. I don't even think it's limited to UV exposure, just flexing the hinge over time wears it out. I wouldn't call them totally unacceptable but you'd better plan on replacing them regularly. 

 

On 1/15/2019 at 8:20 PM, fizzymagic said:

I recommend waterproof log sheets for all cache containers.

^^I just thought the above was worth repeating.^^

 

On 1/16/2019 at 5:47 AM, coachstahly said:

Bison tubes and their o-rings (as mentioned) are the main issue and will need either an o-ring replacement or a full container replacement once the o-ring deteriorates.

I've been using EDPM sulfur cured o-rings and so far they seem to hold up MUCH better than what comes with the typical Bison. Search online, I got several hundred in different sizes for only a few dollars. 

 

On 1/15/2019 at 8:20 PM, fizzymagic said:

Pill bottles are entirely unacceptable as geocache containers.  Period.

LOL, I don't use them but they're one of the most popular containers where I live. Some cachers take a lot of pills...   (and yes, I agree, a very poor container)

 

Has anyone had experience with plastic "ammo" cans?  The one's I've found seem to hold up well and they're very cheap at that well know discount tool place (as low as $2.99) but my overnight leak test in a tub of water was disappointing. 

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4 hours ago, MtnGoat50 said:

Has anyone had experience with plastic "ammo" cans?  The one's I've found seem to hold up well and they're very cheap at that well know discount tool place (as low as $2.99) but my overnight leak test in a tub of water was disappointing. 

 

We test most containers we've heard of/wanted to try for around a year.  Three different plastic AC variants we had didn't hold up either

 - We leave 'em against a tree, with only a few branches on top (sort of what we see the area deteriorate to between maintenance).

 - We have found a few that must be just in the right spot, as they were dry. Under rock shelves/small caves mostly.

But one small cave had a large tackle box with no seals and all books inside.  All were dry.   So I guess YMMV.   :)

 

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17 hours ago, MtnGoat50 said:

Has anyone had experience with plastic "ammo" cans?

 

It's been a roughly 50/50 proposition of the ones I've found.  Half have been in really good shape while the other half contained some amount of water in them from condensation lining the walls (rendering the contents damp/wet) to a full out flooded container.  Granted, I've only found about 10 of them to date, but they've been all over the place with regard to keeping things dry.

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17 hours ago, MtnGoat50 said:

Has anyone had experience with plastic "ammo" cans?  The one's I've found seem to hold up well and they're very cheap at that well know discount tool place (as low as $2.99) but my overnight leak test in a tub of water was disappointing. 

 

I have two deployed and both have kept their contents dry.  Both have a gasket, though.  The cheapest models don't appear to have a gasket, and the ones I bought were on sale at a sporting goods store for about $15.  (One of these hides is under a rock ledge, so it's out of the elements.  The other is on the ground under a pile of typical geoflage.)

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19 hours ago, MtnGoat50 said:

Has anyone had experience with plastic "ammo" cans?

 

The only brand of plastic ammo cans I've found is Plano, which contains a gasket.  I don't know if they're the only brand that makes them or not, but they are the only ones at the outdoor stores and ammo/gun stores I've seen.  Again, hit or miss.  I will say that the last 3 I've found have all been dry inside so I wonder if they've worked out the kinks in manufacturing them.

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Thanks everyone that took the time to respond to my question!

 

I've been getting the plastic ammo cans from Harbor Freight. They appear to be identical to the "Plano" ones I've seen other places, but I haven't looked closely. The normal sale price is $3.99 but last fall they were $2.99 (normal price $6.99). They have a gasket but looking closely it doesn't look like it's being compressed when closed. Not a good thing. The one I submerged in a sink of water leaked badly. 

 

5 hours ago, Joe_L said:

the ones I bought were on sale at a sporting goods store for about $15. 

Yikes, around here you can get the real deal, metal ones for that.  I always assume when I hide a cache that I'll be replacing the container sooner or later. It will get stolen, damaged, or just fail, so I try to keep the cost down and have lots of spares in reserve. At $2.99 the plastic ammo cans seemed ideal but now I'm not so sure. I still think they'll work okay as long as the spot isn't too wet and they're hidden upright. Time will tell. 

 

 

 

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Aldi recently had some lock n lock/ sistema type containers on sale. I bought one to try. It's been sitting in my dishwaher going through cycles for the last week. In another week I'll see how its handling the conditions. I put a paper logsheet in it.

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10 hours ago, colleda said:

Aldi recently had some lock n lock/ sistema type containers on sale. I bought one to try. It's been sitting in my dishwaher going through cycles for the last week. In another week I'll see how its handling the conditions. I put a paper logsheet in it.

 

Hadn't thought of this for testing.  I wonder if the hotter water dishwashers usually run would affect results.  (I imagine heated dry would if it's not switched off.)

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On 1/21/2019 at 2:11 PM, coachstahly said:

 

The only brand of plastic ammo cans I've found is Plano, which contains a gasket.  I don't know if they're the only brand that makes them or not, but they are the only ones at the outdoor stores and ammo/gun stores I've seen.  Again, hit or miss.  I will say that the last 3 I've found have all been dry inside so I wonder if they've worked out the kinks in manufacturing them.

 

While not technically an ammo can, otter boxes are available in similar sizes, are very durable and water proof, but are also more expensive then ammo cans.

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On 1/22/2019 at 10:58 PM, hzoi said:

 

Hadn't thought of this for testing.  I wonder if the hotter water dishwashers usually run would affect results.  (I imagine heated dry would if it's not switched off.)

I checked the container yesterday and it was wet inside and the log sheet soaked. I've dried it out an put it back in the dishwasher for another round because I did open it between washes to check and may have not reclosed it properly as sometimes happens in real situations. BTW, It does not have a gasket like Sistema and LocknLocks.

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On 1/18/2019 at 3:05 PM, IMaCheesehead said:

I want to know if people put logs inside pill bottles, then the pill bottle inside a bigger container.  I think this "double container" will result in more dry logsheets.  

Comments?

We try and double-container all of our hides, where possible - smaller lock'n'lock/sistema in larger one, sistema in ammo tin, pill-bottle type containers in small sistemas.... we've only had water ingress problems at one cache, and the log was ok inside the sub-container.... Where double containers are impossible, a sheltered hide and waterproof paper will help....

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I've found sistemas effectively buried in mud for a year, with bone-dry logs inside, and others seemingly sheltered and wet - I suspect dirt/stick and ziplock baggies fouling the seal are the root cause in a lot of these problems....

 

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On ‎1‎/‎22‎/‎2019 at 6:58 AM, hzoi said:

 

Hadn't thought of this for testing.  I wonder if the hotter water dishwashers usually run would affect results.  (I imagine heated dry would if it's not switched off.)

 

That may or may not be a suitable test.  I hardly ever find a cache that has been excessively cleaned.

 

 

 

Edited by kunarion
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11 hours ago, lee737 said:

I suspect dirt/stick and ziplock baggies fouling the seal are the root cause in a lot of these problems....

I agree.

 

Why people think a gallon sized baggie is a good idea in a pint sized container always surprises me.  Part of the baggie always ends up caught in the seal and lets water in. Even worse are containers placed inside a baggie. My experience at least has been that baggies do a poor job of keeping water out but a great job of keeping it in. Once a container inside a baggie gets wet it will stay wet forever.

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Assorted container musings:

I buy ammo cans (30s used) in lots of 12-20, delivered to my home for about $6.50 each (USA). If you can hide ammocans (and I appreciate that there places where you cannot) why buy anything else? (hint, use the internet..)

 

Lock and locks are only fair containers in Florida and I expect anywhere in the humidity. The seal will get moldy and wick water, ditto plastic ammocans, and all drybox Pelican type cases. I see no appreciable difference between lock and locks and other (cheaper) snap on lidded food storage containers.  

 

I've been gifted two Pelican cases that Geocaching.com sells, and find that the seal will wick water quite nicely once a bit moldy, (ie, a few months into summer) and because of the flat, open design, are worse than other containers for the careless hider to close the lid a pine needle, baggie, cache goodie.  The smaller sizes can do okay hanging. They degrade in sunlight.  Checking one of mine, seeing it look okay, I nearly didn't open it. When I did, the lid disintegrated in my hands ;-)

 

Oddly, I'm going to disagree on pill bottles.  Some designs seem to hold up quite well over time.  I haven't made a study of which - I just know that I've found pill bottles out in the swamps for years, still dry.  I wonder if anyone ever has tried to work out which hold up and which don't? back when film cans were the done thing, most knew that that black body, grey lid was about useless, which the all transparent worked okay.

 

Wide mouth water bottles make good smalls.  One of the nalgene designs is darn near perfect, the lid is the width of the container and has a finger hole, perfect for hanging. Costs as much as the ammo cans I buy, but is versatile to hide.  I always check for these in thrift stores, have bought numbers of them at $1 each.

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