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JesZe

Has geocaching changed the way you are experiencing your environment?

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Hey!

 

Im just beginner geocacher, but I really like this hobby. What I like especially is how geocaching has increased my movin to nature and visiting new places. I've lived almost my entire life in the same city so naturally I know my surroundings relatively well. Even though I knew the city well, after starting geocaching it has brought me new aspects to the familiar surroundings. Geocahing led me to new places where I did not think to go before and the log infos often gave a lot of new historical information about different subjects and places. This sometimes helps to get known to completely new areas and places aswell. You are really looking your surrounding with "new eyes". I was wondering does other people have had same kind of experiences since they started geocaching? Sorry for spelling errors english is not my first language. Feel free to discuss!

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We know a couple that lived most their lives in a city.  The wife always had someone go with her on even light park walks.

Every little thing was "lions, and tigers, and bears, oh my..." with each new turn.    ;)

She started heading out with the other 2/3rds, who until meeting me,  was similar.   They got along well.

She recently beat me to a new cache high up into a ridge, through waist-high wildflower fields just after a rain.  I think she's getting used to her new environment.    :)

 

 

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Feelings you are experiencing are exactly the same as my own feelings after I started this hobby years ago. Places that you normally pass by quickly become more familiar as usual and if you have the desire to hide caches you will also look at the world in a completely different way.

 

Today I was driving my car and during this ride, I remembered clearly when I was here and there looking for some geocache. For me, those places are associated with geocaches hidden nearby. If I see something potentially interesting, I don't hesitate to investigate it deeper than usual because it may show up something which is worthy of a new cache.

 

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We have discovered so many new parks and unique areas in our own region of the world, we would never have known about except for geocaching. Also, we have traveled to many places, we would not have otherwise. As COs, we are always looking at new places for cache placement with the thought of what could we do here? 

 

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I grew up in a family that wasn't really the out door type.   Geocaching actually introduced me to nature.   Now I own 22 Geocaches and 20 Letterboxes all hidden on conservation land as part of various initiatives to bring people to these places.  I'm also on the board of directors of two committees that manage and promote conservation and open space.   There's no doubt in my mind that Geocaching is a tool that can influence the way people see and interact with nature.    

 

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It's made me much more observant (cachers' trails, camouflage...), and I now know many pockets of countryside within 15 miles or so of home that I'd never have explored otherwise - and the lanes that link them together. Not to mention some bits of urbex (underground rivers etc), and more legitimately, exploring disused railway lines that are now trails, and occasionally jumping in a kayak and seeing the world from water level. All fascinating stuff.

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He: "There's a nice little park about a block away, just off the main road."

She: "There is?"

He: "Yeah, I discovered it while geocaching recently."

She: "Of course you did..."

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I've always been one to get out of my comfort zone and Geocaching has taken me a lot of places well beyond any comfort zone.  I kinda like that about the game.

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33 minutes ago, DragonsWest said:

I've always been one to get out of my comfort zone and Geocaching has taken me a lot of places well beyond any comfort zone.  I kinda like that about the game.

 

So true!

 

I would never have hiked anywhere near this EC. But reading the logs and all the sense of awe and accomplishment I had to do it. https://coord.info/GC2MNZA

 

Also just finding some of the pocket parks hidden in neighborhoods. Never knew they were there and the ones I did know about probably would not have stopped. Seeing some of the wildlife in our suburban environment is so cool. Bald Eagles, Herons, Song birds, Deer, Elk, Coyotes, Beavers. Fortunate that the times I've spotted beavers my dogs were on leash they have a bad reputation. For the deer I don't know who surprised whom the most.

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For me this started as a way to get my kids off the couch and in nature.  Now my oldest has our main account that we log all our finds on.  In the first couple times out we learned a lot about a nature area across the street from our home.  It has put my family in situations that I do not believe they would attempt without the goal of a smiley in mind, last fall we had to cross about a 60' wide creek on a fallen tree.  I am also using this hobby as a training tool of sorts.  We are planning a Disney trip in a few months and I am getting my kids used to being out on their feet for extended periods, so 5 days in the parks is not a complete physical shock to them.  

 

To make this even more fun, I have taken Cub Scout groups out in areas I have found and families that have lived in the area for generations did not know of some of the cool places this has taken me.  

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7 hours ago, StumblinMonk said:

For me this started as a way to get my kids off the couch and in nature.  Now my oldest has our main account that we log all our finds on.  In the first couple times out we learned a lot about a nature area across the street from our home.  It has put my family in situations that I do not believe they would attempt without the goal of a smiley in mind, last fall we had to cross about a 60' wide creek on a fallen tree.  I am also using this hobby as a training tool of sorts.  We are planning a Disney trip in a few months and I am getting my kids used to being out on their feet for extended periods, so 5 days in the parks is not a complete physical shock to them.  

 

To make this even more fun, I have taken Cub Scout groups out in areas I have found and families that have lived in the area for generations did not know of some of the cool places this has taken me.  

Forget the kids.  5 days at Disney almost killed me!  

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The area where I live is surrounded by a hinterland of sandstone ridges and gullies with so many amazing waterfalls, caves and rock formations that caching has taken me to, places I'd have never discovered otherwise. I'm fortunate to have followed in the footsteps of some seriously adventurous cachers in our local community.

 

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18 hours ago, Team Christiansen said:

When I still had kids at home, 1 day at Disney would kill me!

I did 4 days at Disneyworld, in August, a few years ago and the heat practically killed me.   This summer, however, we took our son on an "amusement park vacation", visiting 3 different amusement parks (Hershey, Kings Dominion, and Busch Gardens Williamsburg) and spent 7 days at the parks and didn't die.

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18 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

The area where I live is surrounded by a hinterland of sandstone ridges and gullies with so many amazing waterfalls, caves and rock formations that caching has taken me to, places I'd have never discovered otherwise. I'm fortunate to have followed in the footsteps of some seriously adventurous cachers in our local community.

 

DSC_0045_small.jpg.580ef94e4662cede7692157f55ca607b.jpgDSC_0007_small.jpg.57afa972f8941d25ec824649a67a5b1a.jpgDSC_0233_small.jpg.6e548c70e97c90b1f9a746f8352b559d.jpg

 

That last picture looks like it could be from where I live.  There are over 100 waterfalls over 15' high within 10 miles of where I live.

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Has geocaching changed the way you are experiencing your environment?

 

I'd have to say No.  I've been a hiker and climber (rock mostly, but an occasional stratovolcano) most of my life, and geocaching just added to that enjoyment of the outdoors.  Now with older knees and ankles, It does give me an excuse to stop ("have to find this cache...").

 

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Has geocaching changed the way you are experiencing your environment? 

 

Similar to the Jester I guess, I've been outdoors (started with my father...) since the Dead Sea was just sick.

Many areas when starting were already traveled, but new for the other 2/3rds, so still fun.  :)

Now that communities are buying up or given undeveloped properties (curious where the tax base is going...) , there are a lot more areas that were private earlier, now able to explored.

Because of this hobby, we've been able to compile quite a list of areas that have presented good experiences in hunting/fishing as well.  With parking.  ;)

 

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On 9/20/2018 at 10:35 PM, The Jester said:

Has geocaching changed the way you are experiencing your environment?

 

I'd have to say No.  I've been a hiker and climber (rock mostly, but an occasional stratovolcano) most of my life, and geocaching just added to that enjoyment of the outdoors.  Now with older knees and ankles, It does give me an excuse to stop ("have to find this cache...").

 

Me too. I've been geocaching since 1959, I just didn't know what it was called.

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