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Using Tupperware as a geocache?


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Hi,

I always hear geocaching described as "using a GPS to find Tupperware in the woods." I'm interested to see how well Tupperware works as a geocache. I have a large Tupperware container that I'm thinking of using as a geocache. The plastic is not flimsy like some of the cheaper, newer plastic containers, and it appears to be in excellent shape. Does anyone have experience with Tupperware as a geocache? Are the containers durable, and do they last long?

Thanks.

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I think it's the weakest of the 3 brand name storage containers:  Lock and lock, Rubbermaid, and last Tupperware. The lip is shallow - makes them more vulnerable to leakage. That said, if I owned one, I might place it and hope to get a year or 2  out of it.   Generally plastic food storage containers degrade in sunlight, and develop a film in the lip that wicks water.

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I don't like Tupperware or Rubbermaid. Anything that doesn't have snaps to lock it will begin leaking fairly soon. I like lock&lock and "Snap Lock" sold at Costco.

There's also a brand sold at Ocean 5 Job Lots in New England that I can't remember the name of.

I've had Lock&Lock and Snap Lock containers that last for many years. Eventually the tabs start breaking off.

Edited by hukilaulau
typo
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Of course a lot of it depends where you're going to place it. I had a "generic" plastic box, with no locking lid, which lasted several years with no leakage because it was placed in a spot where it was protected from rain and sun, it would have gone on and on and on if I hadn't archived it.

 

 

 

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I have some vintage 1960's tupperware that my Mom gave me in the mid-80's when I was establishing my first apartment with a kitchen.  It still does a great job today, keeping my leftovers fresh in the refrigerator.

 

I'd never dream of using either that vintage tupperware, or modern tupperware, as a geocache.  Of the major brands, Tupperware has the worst "user interface."  Without tabs, it's far more likely that the last visitor will fail to fully close a tupperware cache container, so that when you find it, the contents are a pulpy mush.  I remember this well from the early days of geocaching (caches hidden in 2000-2004).  Those early experiments with Tupperware are archived now, unless the CO replaced the container once Lock & Lock and Sistema came along and caught on quickly in the Geocaching community.

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12 hours ago, 321geocache said:

I always hear geocaching described as "using a GPS to find Tupperware in the woods." I'm interested to see how well Tupperware works as a geocache. I have a large Tupperware container that I'm thinking of using as a geocache. The plastic is not flimsy like some of the cheaper, newer plastic containers, and it appears to be in excellent shape. Does anyone have experience with Tupperware as a geocache? Are the containers durable, and do they last long?

 

 "I use multi-million dollar satellites to find Tupperware in the woods" just sounds fun on a tee.      :)

 

All of our first caches not micros were Tupperware.  That's what most around here used.  They all quickly became a science experiment with the assorted molds growing inside. 

We replaced them with lock n locks , with many of them having issues with snap tabs.  Stuck with them for the small hides, finding nothing better at the time...

Finally ended up using only ammo cans for regulars, in both 30 and 50cal, and prefer ammo cans to most plastics today.  Cost no longer a factor here,  our 30cals cost less than many plastics today.

 

Of all the easily available plastic containers we tested out back (we test outdoor gear too) plano's stowaway in any size lasted the best for us. 

If we were in an area that required a clear container, we'd use a stowaway today.

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2 hours ago, fizzymagic said:

 

Lock n lock is not durable either.

 

Here is one I found yesterday.  As is usual,  all four tabs had broken off.

20180512_152054.jpg

 

Cute. Almost looks like the tabs were used as trade items. B)

 

 

Edited by kunarion
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1 hour ago, fizzymagic said:

 

Lock n lock is not durable either.

 

Here is one I found yesterday.  As is usual,  all four tabs had broken off.

20180512_152054.jpg

 

How old was it? i.e. how many years did it spend outdoors? Was it out in direct sunlight? Camo tape on the lid would have helped slow down the deterioration at the tab joints. 

 

Any good plastic container that's been outdoors for more than 2 years should be checked for wear and tear. This looks like it was abandoned by the CO. It's unlikely that 4 tabs fell off at one time. The container looks like it was out there for many years with no care. When was the first report about a missing tab?

 

A Tupperware(TM) container has no gasket. I have found 3 in my caching history. All had water inside. 2 only a couple of months old. 

 

Is there a plastic container you would recommend? 

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51 minutes ago, L0ne.R said:

Is there a plastic container you would recommend?

 

I don't know whether you can get them in your part of the world, but the Sistema Klip-It series (made in New Zealand) with a sealed lid and hinged clips do pretty well. Here's one I found a few weeks back, hidden in a tree stump in a forest in 2005 (yep, thirteen years ago) and sitll the original container and logbook.

 

DSC_0430.jpg.5552ae5e76f360e0fe6bd0ea39f4527a.jpgDSC_0429.jpg.400a816c2d4f8783af07359c9370bd32.jpg

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2 hours ago, fizzymagic said:

 

Lock n lock is not durable either.

 

Here is one I found yesterday.  As is usual,  all four tabs had broken off.

20180512_152054.jpg

I have had no luck with Lock N Lock either. All of the Lock N Lock and Tupperware have failed in less then two years.  

 

On a 19 cache series of mine I used Lock N Lock, AmmoCans, metal cookie cans and Plastic Screw top Metamucil containers.  All the Lock N Lock have been replaced.  None of the Ammo cans, metal cookie cans or Metamuucil containers have been replaced although the metal cookie cans are getting hard to open.  I have had Metamucil containers out for 15 years.  Oh, I live in the Mojave Dessert so water is not a big deal but heat and sun are.

Edited by captnemo
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1 hour ago, L0ne.R said:

Is there a plastic container you would recommend? 

 

I don't tend to use plastic containers a lot, but Sistema seems the best of the lot.

 

Used peanut-butter bottles tend to be pretty durable as well, but that is just from my observations in the field -- I have never uesd one myself.

 

I will reiterate my position from another thread:  starting out with a good container obviates much of the angst in the forums about maintenance.

 

OBTW: the cache dates back to 2002, but the container looks like it was put in place in 2014.  Less than a year later, a log mentions one of the tabs coming off. The container seems to have been buried for a year, and the hide was out of the direct sunlight.

Edited by fizzymagic
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1 minute ago, fizzymagic said:

 

I don't tend to use plastic containers a lot, but Sistema seems the best of the lot.

 

Used peanut-butter bottles tend to be pretty durable as well, but that is just from my observations in the field -- I have never uesd one myself.

 

I will reiterate my position from another thread:  starting out with a good container obviates much of the angst in the forums about maintenance.

Ive seen a number of peanut-butter jars that have failed especially the lids, will stick with my Metamucil containers.

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52 minutes ago, captnemo said:

Ive seen a number of peanut-butter jars that have failed especially the lids, will stick with my Metamucil containers.

 

Yes, that's the primary failing point. The lid. 

The metimucil containers work because they come with a paper gasket. 

 

PB jar lids need a gasket. Fun foam cut to fit snuggly works. 

Without a gasket water wicks in. It's especially a problem for ground hides. 

 

 

 

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I have a peanut butter jar that sits in a rotting tree about 4 feet off the ground and every time I check it, it's dry as a bone.  It's been out for quite a few years.  I live in a 4 season area so moisture is certainly a possibility.  I usually replace my lock n locks (or other tab variations) when moisture begins to become an issue.

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I'm flattered but famous is certainly a new one to me.  LOL

 

I actually have a couple PB jars out (once I actually thought about my caches), but for the most part, they're not really exposed to a lot of sunshine so I have that going for me with regard to plastic degradation when it comes to sun exposure.  The best ones are still metal ammo cans and those have held up the best when compared to everything else.  The problem is finding a spot that a muggle won't just happen to find when out strolling.  That is always my first consideration, when I'm thinking about placing an ammo can.  

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1 hour ago, coachstahly said:

I'm flattered but famous is certainly a new one to me.  LOL

 

 

I can't wait to find one of your mystery or multi caches. They all seem well-made and bring people to interesting places. One mystery cache in particular seems a little easier to solve. I'll probably try it on the weekend when I have time to walk to each stage.

 

1 hour ago, coachstahly said:

I actually have a couple PB jars out (once I actually thought about my caches), but for the most part, they're not really exposed to a lot of sunshine so I have that going for me with regard to plastic degradation when it comes to sun exposure.  The best ones are still metal ammo cans and those have held up the best when compared to everything else.  The problem is finding a spot that a muggle won't just happen to find when out strolling.  That is always my first consideration, when I'm thinking about placing an ammo can.  

 

The park I am hiding the cache in has many muggles, but the area of the park where I'm hiding it has few muggles as it is off the trail. It should be a relatively easy cache, about a 1.5/1.5 or 1.5/2.0. No hilly or rough terrain.

This park is also home to one of your multi caches with a D/T rating of 5/4. Looks like the cache I'll be hiding will have the lowest D/T rating in the park.

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