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justintim1999

Power Trail?

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When dose a series of caches become a Power Trail?   

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Depends on who you ask.

  • Some will say it's a PT if the caches are placed 0.1 miles apart, but a series if caches are placed at an interval with more distance than that.
  • Some will say it's a PT if the caches are along a motorized roadway, but a series if caches are placed along a hiking-only trail.
  • Some will say it's a PT if the caches are placed by the same CO, but a series if there is a mix of CO's among the caches.
  • Some will say it's a PT if there are 10+ caches or 50+ caches, but a series if there are only 10 caches.
  • Some will say it's a PT if the caches share a common name like xxx #001, xxx #002, xxx #003, but a series if the cache names are more unique.
  • Some will say it's a PT if the containers are 'cheap' and not 'authentic' brand-name containers., but a series if the caches are in high-quality containers.
  • Some will say it's a PT if the CO doesn't do regular maintenance and/or allows throwdowns, but a series if the CO performs regular maintenance.

Seems to me that all PT's are series, but not all series are PT's.

:drama:

How to define a power trail has been a debatable topic for many years.

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To me a series is two or more caches with a common theme, for example my "Chasing Waterfalls" series which, strangely enough, are all about waterfalls. Yes, they all share the common name followed by a number (so far 1 to 5) but they're all T3 or higher and most have the "takes more than 1 hour" attribute so no-one's going to get fast smileys from them.

So from that would come my definition of a power trail as a string of caches specifically designed to provide lots of smileys in quick time - that's its overarching purpose and anything else is secondary. A consequence of that is they need to be close-spaced otherwise getting to them quickly becomes a problem. I don't know if a power trail necessarily implies unmaintained rubbish containers and throwdowns, but if the sole aim is rapid-fire smileys that's probably going to frequently happen.

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20 minutes ago, barefootjeff said:

So from that would come my definition of a power trail as a string of caches specifically designed to provide lots of smileys in quick time - that's its overarching purpose and anything else is secondary.

That pretty much matches my definition as well.  There are lot of "series" based on a common theme but the theme doesn't extend further than the name and when it comes down to it, it's just a bunch of caches designed to provide lots of smileys in a short amount of time.  A chasing waterfalls series which takes you to a bunch of different waterfalls i one thing.  A group of caches which just has the name of a waterfall might more likely be a power traill.

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I guess I'm confused on what the overriding criteria of a power trail is.   Dose it have more to do with the number of caches in a row or the quality of those caches?    If there were 25 caches spaced 600 ft apart and those caches were quality hides and maintained,  would that be considered a power trail?

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Hmmmm....I was thinking of hiding a single container and calling it "The World's Shortest Power Trail" so.......

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10 minutes ago, justintim1999 said:

I guess I'm confused on what the overriding criteria of a power trail is.   Dose it have more to do with the number of caches in a row or the quality of those caches?    If there were 25 caches spaced 600 ft apart and those caches were quality hides and maintained,  would that be considered a power trail?

To me it's about intent. What do you want people to come away with after they've done the series? A fun bike ride, some beautiful scenery or whatever, or just "I got 25 quick smileys". I don't think cache quality and maintenance define a power trail - I'm sure a dedicated CO could make a good quality well-maintained power trail and with only 25 caches that probably wouldn't be too onorous.

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2 hours ago, justintim1999 said:

I guess I'm confused on what the overriding criteria of a power trail is.   Dose it have more to do with the number of caches in a row or the quality of those caches?    If there were 25 caches spaced 600 ft apart and those caches were quality hides and maintained,  would that be considered a power trail?

There is a power trail like that in a local park. A popular trail was saturated with hides of different types and styles. The parks department uses it for their intro geocaching classes, and has done so since before the development of the modern numbers trail.

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3 hours ago, noncentric said:

Seems to me that all PT's are series, but not all series are PT's.

:drama:

How to define a power trail has been a debatable topic for many years.

Yep, it ain't gonna end any time soon :P

 

3 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

So from that would come my definition of a power trail as a string of caches specifically designed to provide lots of smileys in quick time

Or slow time... I've seen power trails of difficult caches that take time (by D or T). In that sense you could see "power" not as referring to speed, but moreso to numerous themed caches, where the experience is relatively similar. Not necessarily about finding in quick succession, but powering through a single 'theme'.  But even then, 20 caches where each one is different like night day in every way could still be a power trail... although one could argue that the 'similarity' is that they're all 'different'. :P

 

2 hours ago, justintim1999 said:

I guess I'm confused on what the overriding criteria of a power trail is.

I don't think there is one. It may be easier to define it by what it is not (and by general consensus since there are always outliers and devils-advocates)

* A PT is not a single cache.
* A PT is not comprised of final caches that are not near each other.
* A PT is not scattered around an area with no discernable route or connection or order by which they were intended to be found.

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You could also consider that there's intent in publishing, and intent in finding. One could turn a load of nearby caches which the CO(s) did not intend to be a "power trail" into a power trail by the method in which a cacher plans to find them. (though that's a little more unlikely; I don't know anyone who would say they're going to find a power trail that isn't otherwise considered a power trail; but conceptually I can imagine a trail being populated by a bunch of unrelated caches by independent COs and some cachers coming at it like a powertrail)

And a series of caches the COs intend to be found as a power trail could be chipped away at by someone who has no idea what it is, and finds one or two at a time wherever they may be over the course of a year; like finding any other caches in the area.

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1 hour ago, barefootjeff said:

To me it's about intent. What do you want people to come away with after they've done the series? A fun bike ride, some beautiful scenery or whatever, or just "I got 25 quick smileys". I don't think cache quality and maintenance define a power trail - I'm sure a dedicated CO could make a good quality well-maintained power trail and with only 25 caches that probably wouldn't be too onorous.

I agree!  Imo, a power trail has no redeeming value except to provide a means for finders to up smiley count quickly and easily. ET is a power trail,, every container the same, hidden similarly, and placed at .10 mile intervals on the side of the road. It was hidden for this purpose, nothing else.

While i'm sure most power trail owners rely on finders for maintenance, it's not really a determining factor.  Power trails usually (i've never seen one that didn't) utilize a same name, ascending digit, naming structure. But again, this doesn't automatically mean caches using this naming structure are part of a pt. While opinions differ, i don't consider caches placed .10 miles apart on a hike/bike trail as being a power trail. This simply because they take too much time to be of any good to numbers hungry people. 

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It seems that the word "power trail" carries with it a negative vibe.   God forbid your series of hides gets labeled a power trail.  I have a series of 9 caches along a nice trail.  I don't think it would be classified as a power trail.  My main reason for 9 caches placed about 600 ft apart was to try to "cover" the area with caches I hoped would be fun, and knowing they would  be maintained.  For me it was about trying to guarantee an overall experience by limiting the chance of someone dropping a cache in the middle of the series and then not taking care of it.    It's easy to spot a power trail on the map and I guess they do have a place in geocaching.

I was just curious at what point dose a series become a power trail?  

I think barefootjeff may have answered my question.  I guess it all comes down to intent.   

 

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10 minutes ago, justintim1999 said:

I was just curious at what point dose a series become a power trail?  

Since there is no official definition from Groundspeak, you're going to get different opinions as to this.

Well, I guess there is an outdated definition, as Groundspeak used to ban them.

To borrow a phrase from Justice Potter Stewart's concurring opinion in Jacobellis v. Ohio, "I know it when I see it."  Usually zooming out to level 11 or so on the map is a good way: if there's a clear line of closely-spaced caches on the map that follow a route for a few miles, I think it can safely be labeled as a power trail.  The quality of the containers doesn't exempt a series from being defined as a power trail -- but it's probably going to be a more enjoyable power trail than one made of leaky old 35mm film cans, for me at least.

 

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21 minutes ago, hzoi said:

Since there is no official definition from Groundspeak

https://www.geocaching.com/about/glossary.aspx

Power Trail
    A path with a large number of caches placed within close proximity to each other. Promotes players' ability to easily increase their find count.

 

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"Power Trail" has numerous meanings, as shown by noncentric, on top of the "official" one...    :)

There was a beautiful multi-mile walk to the top of a mountain with one, simple Traditional cache on the end, and it turned out to be what I think is my best day at this hobby.

About two years later, it had other " placed while on the way to..." mediocre containers every 1/2-3/4 mile or so by different cachers.

Eventually enough "caches", nothing more than pill bottles placed wherever they'd fit "just because they can", turned that adventure into what I feel is now just a power trail. 

Still leads to the same awesome spot as that first original cache, and I've passed all those others to stop there, but I guess more than a few have a need to be further rewarded to reach it.

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And I don't like that "promote" describing find count increase.  Sometimes a powertrail is there to "promote" a certain experience, which isn't necessarily merely the 'find count'.  A power trail certainly does make increasing the count easy, but that's not always the intent.  But at least the official definition doesn't imply whether it's "good" or "bad" :P

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23 minutes ago, L0ne.R said:
44 minutes ago, hzoi said:

Since there is no official definition from Groundspeak

https://www.geocaching.com/about/glossary.aspx

Power Trail
    A path with a large number of caches placed within close proximity to each other. Promotes players' ability to easily increase their find count.

I stand corrected. 

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Given a series of caches, how to determine if I consider it a Power Trail? Here is my algorithm (Obviouly, very very subjective and personal). Sum the points given in each step

A. Has more than 5 caches?

      - YES: Points= #caches /Sum of distances between a cache and the following in the series (in Km), round to the closest half point

                For example: 40 caches for a total of 15 Km: 40/15=2.6666 -> 2.5 pts

      - NO: It is not a PT, end of algorithm

 B. Look at 5 randomly chosen caches of the series:

      - Are the listings almost the same?  Yes: +1 point

      - After some Google Earth research, would you hide an individual cache in that location because of its interest? No: +0.5 points for each cache meeting this condition

      - Are there any repeated hint in those 5? YES: +0.5 

      - Are the Difficulty ratings the same in the 5? YES: +1

      - Are there several groups of teams signing the same log in all the caches? YES: +0.5 

      - Are there logs suggesting throwdowns in those caches? YES: +2

C. Is it a series of mysteries/wherigos/letters where you get all the coordinates from just solving one listing? Yes: +3

D. Is there an independent/unrelated cache in the route of the series with lot of generic logs about the series but no about the specific unrelated cache? YES: +2

E. If the series has more than 100 caches and there are teams logging the whole series in the same day +5

 

If the sum of all the points is above 6, I'm pretty sure that it is a Power Trail and then I'm not interested on it.

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Wow!  I woulda "lost interest in it"  less than halfway through all the math...   :D

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3 minutes ago, anpefi said:

Here is my algorithm

That seems unnecessarily complicated.  To quote Teen Talk Barbie, "Math class is tough!  Want to go shopping?"

Here's my take.

 

 

capture.JPG

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Why does man always go to extremes???  Uncontrolled human nature.  At least you aren't trying to control a country.

 

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1 hour ago, anpefi said:

Given a series of caches, how to determine if I consider it a Power Trail? Here is my algorithm (Obviouly, very very subjective and personal). Sum the points given in each step

A. Has more than 5 caches?

      - YES: Points= #caches /Sum of distances between a cache and the following in the series (in Km), round to the closest half point

                For example: 40 caches for a total of 15 Km: 40/15=2.6666 -> 2.5 pts

      - NO: It is not a PT, end of algorithm

 B. Look at 5 randomly chosen caches of the series:

      - Are the listings almost the same?  Yes: +1 point

      - After some Google Earth research, would you hide an individual cache in that location because of its interest? No: +0.5 points for each cache meeting this condition

      - Are there any repeated hint in those 5? YES: +0.5 

      - Are the Difficulty ratings the same in the 5? YES: +1

      - Are there several groups of teams signing the same log in all the caches? YES: +0.5 

      - Are there logs suggesting throwdowns in those caches? YES: +2

C. Is it a series of mysteries/wherigos/letters where you get all the coordinates from just solving one listing? Yes: +3

D. Is there an independent/unrelated cache in the route of the series with lot of generic logs about the series but no about the specific unrelated cache? YES: +2

E. If the series has more than 100 caches and there are teams logging the whole series in the same day +5

 

If the sum of all the points is above 6, I'm pretty sure that it is a Power Trail and then I'm not interested on it.

I asked for a way to identify power trails and here it is!

I love people that are passionate about something.

Thanks

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5 hours ago, justintim1999 said:

I guess I'm confused on what the overriding criteria of a power trail is.   Dose it have more to do with the number of caches in a row or the quality of those caches?    If there were 25 caches spaced 600 ft apart and those caches were quality hides and maintained,  would that be considered a power trail?

I suppose that depends on how you define "quality".  One of the attributes of a "quality" cache, to me, is the uniqueness of how it's hidden and that can lead to the difficulty in finding it.  In order to promote a high number of finds in a relatively short period, each hide should be easy and require a minimum amount of time before going onto the next cache.  To me,  the "power" in power trail is the characteristic that defines it more than "a trail".   The opportunity to "power through" as many finds as possible is a more of a factor than whether or not all of the caches are placed along a linear trail. Given a power trail of sufficient size, a "limited amount of time" could be a day or two.  

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53 minutes ago, Robespierre said:

Why does man always go to extremes???  Uncontrolled human nature.  At least you aren't trying to control a country.

 

Is this extreme?  https://www.geocaching.com/map/#?ll=46.419517,-0.210628&z=11

There are over 5000 caches, which at that zoom level look like a large blob of caches. Once you zoom in you'll see that it's dozens of interconnected trails of caches.  

8Y1COF3.png

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1 hour ago, NYPaddleCacher said:

Is this extreme?  https://www.geocaching.com/map/#?ll=46.419517,-0.210628&z=11

There are over 5000 caches, which at that zoom level look like a large blob of caches. Once you zoom in you'll see that it's dozens of interconnected trails of caches.  

8Y1COF3.png

Oh my!   Would love to know what brave soul through the multi in there.

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48 minutes ago, justintim1999 said:

Oh my!   Would love to know what brave soul through the multi in there.

If you zoom in a bit you'll see a few puzzle caches.  A few of them are "bonus caches" that are part of the series.  It looks like the first stage of caches in the area was placed in 2013.  There are a couple of multi caches in there.  Most of the recent logs on one of them look like cut-n-paste logs that were used on all the other caches in the area.   A PQ with a 10 mile proximity of a point that seems to be in the middle of the area that were placed before January 2015 had 670 results.  Prior to 2013 there were 226.  Prior to 2013 there were 3.   Now there are 6300 caches within a 10 mile radius.

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4 hours ago, L0ne.R said:

https://www.geocaching.com/about/glossary.aspx

Power Trail
    A path with a large number of caches placed within close proximity to each other. Promotes players' ability to easily increase their find count.

 

We have a winner! I'm not sure why there is so much confusion.

If you want to get more specific, the vast majority are traditional micros with low difficulty/terrain ratings, hidden .1 miles apart along a driveable road.

 

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5 hours ago, justintim1999 said:

It seems that the word "power trail" carries with it a negative vibe.   God forbid your series of hides gets labeled a power trail. 

For some.  For others, it may be just what they're into/looking for.

5 hours ago, justintim1999 said:

I have a series of 9 caches along a nice trail.  I don't think it would be classified as a power trail. 

Others may.

5 hours ago, justintim1999 said:

My main reason for 9 caches placed about 600 ft apart was to try to "cover" the area with caches I hoped would be fun, and knowing they would  be maintained.  For me it was about trying to guarantee an overall experience by limiting the chance of someone dropping a cache in the middle of the series and then not taking care of it.

I've heard very similar from COs of PTs.

5 hours ago, justintim1999 said:

I was just curious at what point dose a series become a power trail?

Since it doesn't seem to be an objective term, at the point someone thinks/says it does.

The PTs I know of around here usually follow some kind hiking trail, whether nature trail, former RR right-of-way, canal towpath, etc.  I've seen many spots I thought would make good hides for some reason or other (scenery, history, architecture, etc.), only to find out they're already between 2 hides in a PT that were dropped 528 ft.apart, to "cover" the area with caches.

That said, I don't think PTs necessarily have to be linear either; I've seen clusters in parks dropped by the same CO to "cover" the area with caches.  I know of one that was hidden in some scrub rough, when there is the most gorgeous spreading tree I may have ever seen just a hundred feet away, which now can't be used because a first-time hider wanted to get one out there a.s.a.p. (but I digress...)

IMO, it's--like so many other things--in the eye/mind of the beholder.

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6 hours ago, justintim1999 said:

My main reason for 9 caches placed about 600 ft apart was to try to "cover" the area with caches I hoped would be fun, and knowing they would  be maintained.

In other words, to prevent anyone else from being able to place a cache in the area and to minimize the amount of work for yourself.

Yep, sounds like a power trail to me.

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2 hours ago, NYPaddleCacher said:

A PQ with a 10 mile proximity of a point that seems to be in the middle of the area that were placed before January 2015 had 670 results.  Prior to 2013 there were 226.  Prior to 2013 there were 3.   Now there are 6300 caches within a 10 mile radius.

Not to quibble, but the PQ only shows those caches that were published at that time and remain active, right?  You'd need to hit project-gc.com to see how many caches were there that were archived.  (But I will gladly stipulate that, whatever those numbers were, they're all significantly lower than the present count of 6300.)

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13 hours ago, fizzymagic said:

In other words, to prevent anyone else from being able to place a cache in the area and to minimize the amount of work for yourself.

Yep, sounds like a power trail to me.

Your wrong again.

If I wanted to minimize the amount of work for myself I would have put one cache at the beginning of the trail and save myself a 2.5 mile round trip hike maintaining the other 8 I did place.   I'll admit the placement was designed to prevent other caches being placed in the area but not for the reasons you've outlined.  

 

 

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15 hours ago, hzoi said:

Not to quibble, but the PQ only shows those caches that were published at that time and remain active, right?  You'd need to hit project-gc.com to see how many caches were there that were archived.  (But I will gladly stipulate that, whatever those numbers were, they're all significantly lower than the present count of 6300.)

Or keep a regular database yourself of all caches over the years. I've got all Ontario in GSAK going back a number of years, and every couple of weeks I update the status of every item to ensure archived caches are listed as such. The only ones I don't have are those that were archived before I began storing date range PQs for the entire province. DIY at least means you can trust you've got everything to your own satisfaction :) and can handle the complete raw data any way you wish.  For one, it makes it very very easy especially to locate qualifier caches for challenges; amongst other desireable (and potentially complex) searches.

Heck you could even create your own "algorithm" to locate/hilight/ignore what you consider to be "power trail" caches :D

Edited by thebruce0
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Gosh darn it, I'm afraid we might have created a power trail. Someone ponder this for awhile, do the math and get back to us.... did we create a monster???

 

We have a series of caches along the North Country Hiking Trail here in Northern Michigan. Caches were originally put out by another cacher and we continued down the trail in the same manner, placing caches about .5 tenths of a mile apart on the trail. This is a hiking trail, no bikes, horses, cars, trucks, 4 wheelers, snowmobiles, atv's or utv's allowed. While you may be able to rack up quite a few smileys doing it, it's gonna take you awhile and get you a bit of exercise! 

While the North Country Trail might get a fair amount of foot traffic in some areas unfortunately it doesn't get a lot in our area, our intent with the placement of these caches was to get people out of the house and into the woods for a good walk. While placing the caches we would do a 5-6 mile section at a time, parking a vehicle at each end of the section. There is rarely another place to join up with the trail so that 5-6 miles is pretty much the norm unless you are only going to grab a few and turn around to go back out.

If anyone is familier with Northern Michigan the series/power trail stretches from M-28 to US 2, not all of those are ours, some belong to another cacher. If I knew how to do a screen shot I would give you one but I'm not that technically advanced.... the caches all begin with NCT-

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They are spread quite far apart, but it certainly looks like a power trail. A powertrail for a different kind of hike perhaps?  Not a quick series.  Looks like fun, IMO :)

NCT.thumb.jpg.ae0c9a0dea3de1ac4942a078185ae676.jpg

We had something similar in central Ontario. There was an oldie 5/5 trad that required a 9 hour hike to get to; a number of years ago someone decided to place a series along the trail to get to it. Not a quick hike, and they weren't 161m apart (though not nearly as spaced as your series), and quite popular, relatively speaking. Brought a lot of people to the 5/5.  It's since been archived, and surprise, the 5/5 is still active :)

I'd call them both a powertrail, but not in 'typical' sense of high-quantity-numbers-really-fast. Again, it's a themed series that one would "power through", however that may be. That's how I look at it.

Edited by thebruce0
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35 minutes ago, thebruce0 said:

They are spread quite far apart, but it certainly looks like a power trail. A powertrail for a different kind of hike perhaps?  Not a quick series.  Looks like fun, IMO :)

NCT.thumb.jpg.ae0c9a0dea3de1ac4942a078185ae676.jpg

We had something similar in central Ontario. There was an oldie 5/5 trad that required a 9 hour hike to get to; a number of years ago someone decided to place a series along the trail to get to it. Not a quick hike, and they weren't 161m apart (though not nearly as spaced as your series), and quite popular, relatively speaking. Brought a lot of people to the 5/5.  It's since been archived, and surprise, the 5/5 is still active :)

I'd call them both a powertrail, but not in 'typical' sense of high-quantity-numbers-really-fast. Again, it's a themed series that one would "power through", however that may be. That's how I look at it.

I agree with you bruce0.

What I like about this power trail is most are not micros.

What I worry about -- how is the CO going to keep up with maintenance issues. The usual practice is to encourage others to throw down caches, or to archive the cache when it needs maintenance or goes missing. How sturdy are the containers that were used?

Unfortunately no one else gets to enjoy ownership on that trail. And if a few spots were to open up, very few would hide a cache among someone else's PT.

Update: looking closer at the CO's PT caches, I'm pretty impressed. No red wrenches. Good logs. Most have been active for 3 years.The best PT ownership I've seen.

Edited by L0ne.R
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7 minutes ago, L0ne.R said:

how is the CO going to keep up with maintenance issues.

I tend to find that in power trails, it's rare that many need maintenance all at once (unless they're left for long periods and slowly stack up). And if there are road crossings along the trail at various intervals, it's usually not that much of a deal to head over and visit a single one if necessary. And if the containers are all relatively decent, then maint is even rarer. So, I'd say maintenance period is also heavily reliant on preparation for the trail by what containers are used. So agreed, you can in a way tell the maintenance ethic of the CO based on the style of hides for the series in the context of the type of trail (ie, stretches of trail before an easy access point).

A powertrail like usyoopers' but with film cans or cheap tupperware wouldn't be a good idea. But a series of weather resistance smaller or larger containers hidden well has a better chance of providing a lower-maintenance series. And everything I can see so far of the trail is a good sign :)

 

11 minutes ago, L0ne.R said:

Unfortunately no one else gets to enjoy ownership on that trail. And if a few spots were to open up, very few would hide a cache among someone else's PT.

Tis true, however as I mentioned earlier I don't consider that much of an issue per se, because that's an issue when any geocache is placed, regardless of where or how closely knit.

If I found a really great hiding place but it was covered by a PT, I might choose to contact the CO and see if there's some way of negotiating relinquishing of the spot for the cache; or perhaps an adjustment of an existing cache... who knows. Many options. Same course of action if it were an independent cache not on a PT.

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1 hour ago, usyoopers said:

Gosh darn it, I'm afraid we might have created a power trail. Someone ponder this for awhile, do the math and get back to us.... did we create a monster???

We have a series of caches along the North Country Hiking Trail here in Northern Michigan. Caches were originally put out by another cacher and we continued down the trail in the same manner, placing caches about .5 tenths of a mile apart on the trail. This is a hiking trail, no bikes, horses, cars, trucks, 4 wheelers, snowmobiles, atv's or utv's allowed. While you may be able to rack up quite a few smileys doing it, it's gonna take you awhile and get you a bit of exercise! 

To me, just the fact that there's no avenue other than walking keeps it from being a "power trail" (A path with a large number of caches placed within close proximity to each other. Promotes players' ability to easily increase their find count).    :D

"Close proximity" doesn't seem to fit either, or at least not until those "placed on the way..."  folks fill it in closer than .5 apart .

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On 9/13/2017 at 10:04 AM, justintim1999 said:

My main reason for 9 caches placed about 600 ft apart was to try to "cover" the area with caches I hoped would be fun, and knowing they would  be maintained. 

 

18 hours ago, fizzymagic said:

In other words, to prevent anyone else from being able to place a cache in the area and to minimize the amount of work for yourself.

Yep, sounds like a power trail to me.

 

5 hours ago, justintim1999 said:

Your wrong again.

[....]   I'll admit the placement was designed to prevent other caches being placed in the area but not for the reasons you've outlined. 

[emphasis mine]

Rhetorical question: Do the reasons (/excuses/justifications) really matter?  We're not a clairvoyant species.  Anyone looking at the map isn't going to know the intention/rationale; all they're going to see is a bunch/series of caches covering an area where no more can be placed (i.e. a power trail).

From where I sit, I don't see much difference between knowing they would be maintained, and making that maintenance efficient (i.e. minimizing the work to do so).

I don't have a dog in this fight.  I'm just an observer, and YMMV. 

Edited by RufusClupea
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Once upon a time, there was an ethic among geocache owners that one should leave room in a park for other caches besides your own, that one should not saturate a park.

Of course, before that, there was an ethic among geocache owners that one should not hide a cache in a park that already had a cache. So times change.

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17 minutes ago, niraD said:

Of course, before that, there was an ethic among geocache owners that one should not hide a cache in a park that already had a cache. So times change.

Yeah, there was that cache in Yellowstone... ;)

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6 hours ago, thebruce0 said:

They are spread quite far apart, but it certainly looks like a power trail. A powertrail for a different kind of hike perhaps?  Not a quick series.  Looks like fun, IMO :)

NCT.thumb.jpg.ae0c9a0dea3de1ac4942a078185ae676.jpg

We had something similar in central Ontario. There was an oldie 5/5 trad that required a 9 hour hike to get to; a number of years ago someone decided to place a series along the trail to get to it. Not a quick hike, and they weren't 161m apart (though not nearly as spaced as your series), and quite popular, relatively speaking. Brought a lot of people to the 5/5.  It's since been archived, and surprise, the 5/5 is still active :)

I'd call them both a powertrail, but not in 'typical' sense of high-quantity-numbers-really-fast. Again, it's a themed series that one would "power through", however that may be. That's how I look at it.

It does look like a power trail when first looking at the map. But looking closer, you see where it is located and that the caches are a bit more spread out. I wouldn't consider this a power trail because it wasn't placed in a way for people to "power" through them. Looks to be more of a laid back, outdoorsie hiking situation to me. Even if a person made it a challenge, they aren't going to get that many of them in a day.

Yep, would like to see something like this in my area.. Looks like a fun series!

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