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Gadget cache ideas


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Not exactly sure what a gadget is in this context but I found a cache a while ago that had a small etch-a-sketch inside. You had to follow instructions to spell out the combo to a lock that accessed the log. Is that in line with what you are thinking?

 

Thanks,

GG

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Not exactly sure what a gadget is in this context but I found a cache a while ago that had a small etch-a-sketch inside. You had to follow instructions to spell out the combo to a lock that accessed the log. Is that in line with what you are thinking?

 

Thanks,

GG

yes that's the type of geocaches I am wondering about. If anyone has any ideas I would love to hear them.

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The most recent gadget-like cache that I found just used one of those plastic maze puzzle boxes that you can put cash or a gift card in, something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LPVTP12?psc=1

 

The log was inside the puzzle box, and the puzzle box was inside a weatherproof container. I've also seen a similar approach with one of those wooden sliding-panel puzzle boxes.

 

If you do something like this, then make sure you use a sturdy puzzle box, and put it inside a good weatherproof container.

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If you don't feel comfortable with programming, then I'd recommend some other approach for your gadget caches. The Pictures - Cool Cache Containers (CCC's) thread has a number of examples of non-electronic gadget caches.

 

I've never found a rain-gauge cache (fill a tube with water so the cache floats to the top), but they've been around since before I started geocaching.

 

I've found caches that required a UV light. (Protecting the UV-reactive paint/ink from exposure to the sun is key.)

 

I've found caches that require a magnet, or where the cache itself includes a magnet and you need to provide something metal for the magnet to stick to.

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The simplest magnet cache I've seen was a multi-cache. At the first stage, you found a spool with fishing line wrapped around it, and a ring-shape rare-earth magnet tied to the end. At the second stage, you lowered the magnet down a hollow tree trunk. It would stick to the metal container, and then you'd pull it up with the fishing line. When you're done, you drop the container back down the hollow tree trunk and return the fishing line to the first stage.

 

Others have involved using a magnet to manipulate a micro-size cache container that is inside a plastic pipe, or using something steel (I used my Leatherman Micra) to manipulate a micro-size cache container that had a magnet attached to it.

 

I've also heard of caches that used various magnetic security latches, where you had to place magnet(s) in specific place(s) to unlock the container.

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I love building gadget caches. I've built 3 based off WVTim. Need some new ideas and I like caches that fit small or medium containers. After the trapdoor one I'm building I'm thinking about doing a visible wood (big version of a door lock) gadget cache. I've done the WVTim marble cache, battery powered and I've built my own mini church (my own idea)

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The simplest magnet cache I've seen was a multi-cache. At the first stage, you found a spool with fishing line wrapped around it, and a ring-shape rare-earth magnet tied to the end. At the second stage, you lowered the magnet down a hollow tree trunk. It would stick to the metal container, and then you'd pull it up with the fishing line. When you're done, you drop the container back down the hollow tree trunk and return the fishing line to the first stage.

 

Others have involved using a magnet to manipulate a micro-size cache container that is inside a plastic pipe, or using something steel (I used my Leatherman Micra) to manipulate a micro-size cache container that had a magnet attached to it.

 

I've also heard of caches that used various magnetic security latches, where you had to place magnet(s) in specific place(s) to unlock the container.

 

My son built a hidden compartment shelf that uses one of these magnetic latches. It works really well.

 

090713040370.jpg

 

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The simplest magnet cache I've seen was a multi-cache. At the first stage, you found a spool with fishing line wrapped around it, and a ring-shape rare-earth magnet tied to the end. At the second stage, you lowered the magnet down a hollow tree trunk. It would stick to the metal container, and then you'd pull it up with the fishing line. When you're done, you drop the container back down the hollow tree trunk and return the fishing line to the first stage.

 

Others have involved using a magnet to manipulate a micro-size cache container that is inside a plastic pipe, or using something steel (I used my Leatherman Micra) to manipulate a micro-size cache container that had a magnet attached to it.

 

I've also heard of caches that used various magnetic security latches, where you had to place magnet(s) in specific place(s) to unlock the container.

 

My son built a hidden compartment shelf that uses one of these magnetic latches. It works really well.

 

090713040370.jpg

 

I built one with the tot lock idea. It's a built like a mini church, right outside the church that it looks like. It's great because it can hold large containers.

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Where do I get one of these magnetic latches? Home Depot? Target?
I would expect Home Depot, Lowe's, and other home-improvement stores to have them.

 

You could also try searching online for "secret magnetic latch" and similar phrases. Other than their obvious :) use for gadget caches, I've seen them recommended for toddler-proofing a home and for securing hidden compartments (for weapons, valuables, etc.). That might help you find online sources too.

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Where do I get one of these magnetic latches? Home Depot? Target?

 

Go to that site named after the river in Africa South America - search for magnetic cabinet latch

 

Not too expensive either - and free shipping for prime members...

 

There. FTFY. :lol:

 

Here went my credibility! :rolleyes:

 

Oh well...

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Where do I get one of these magnetic latches? Home Depot? Target?

 

Go to that site named after the river in Africa - search for magnetic cabinet latch

 

Not too expensive either - and free shipping for prime members...

 

Hmm.. the WearyTraveler is very weary.. the Nile is the one in Africa :blink:

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There are some rules I have learned about making gadget caches to get the most favorite points.    1) Help the finder feel like they are making progress.    If there are steps to solving the cache, do it in stages.   2) Make it so the finder has to return the puzzle as it was when they found it.   If you use a mechanism like a slider puzzle to open the cache container, try and make it so that finder must reset the puzzle to close it.    For example my gadget cache called Q-bert  GC5VQ50 in the video below:

This geocache requires the finder to reset the blocks in order to replace the magnetic game piece used to slide the blocks.    3) People prefer easier over harder puzzles.    For example, my grid and template cache  GC78VTG in the picture below is easy to solve by just rotating the grid on either side of the box to get the combination to the lock.  4) People like hints and sometimes flat out spoilers.   My harder caches have a laminated card in a small envelope with the solution to the gadget cache.   They have it in reserve in case they cannot figure it out.   This gets me more favorite points.

grid and template3.JPG

4) Never identify a gadget cache a Mystery Cache, always select Traditional Cache or multi cache (if there are stages) when identifying the cache type.   Most people tend to avoid mystery caches since they tend to require people to solve an encrypted puzzle or coordinate before finding the cache location.   Identify the caches as a Gadget Cache somewhere in the title of the cache name.   This helps.   5)  A lot of people find gadget caches that blend in with the terrain to be the most fun.     Take a look at my "Jurassic Parking" gadget cache  GC6Z8JK   It's called Jurassic Parking since the cache is in the parking lot of a novelty store with lots of concrete and fiberglass dinosaurs in front.

 

6) If you want some really great idea for geocaches, watch a British game show called "The crystal maze" on YouTube.   It reminds me of escape room puzzles.   The quality of the videos is a little grainy and it was produced in the 90s but there are many great idea that can be adapted into gadget caches.    7) look at other gadget caches in your area.   Most people would be flattered if you duplicated their caches or came up with a twist on someone's gadget cache.  I love to hear that people have made a cache like mine and added more ingenuity to it. And finally, 8) Location for the gadget cache is important.    Place the gadget cache in an area where there are other gadget caches.   You will be competing for favorite points, but many people look for clusters of gadget caches in an area and you ultimately get the most traffic and, in turn,  favorite points that way.   Favorite points are a great way to learn what people like and how to design better gadget caches.

Most important, build gadget caches you would like to find.     Chances are, someone will like it as much as you do or more.


 

Edited by RoombaCats
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1 hour ago, RoombaCats said:

4) Never identify a gadget cache a Mystery Cache, always select Traditional Cache or multi cache (if there are stages) when identifying the cache type.   Most people tend to avoid mystery caches since they tend to require people to solve an encrypted puzzle or coordinate before finding the cache location.

Interesting. I've heard exactly the opposite advice, to avoid frustrating geocachers who show up at the posted coordinates expecting a traditional cache that they can find, open, close, and replace with no gimmicks or gadgets getting in the way.

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Gadget caches are not traditional caches and should never be listed that way, with the possible exception of gadget containers where the puzzle is just to open the container.

I suppose listing as a multi would be OK, but I prefer mystery caches.  f course, I am not competing for favorite points.

I have a lot of original ideas, and have even built (but not yet deployed) two that are, as far as I know, completely unlike anything out there.  But I am not about to share my original ideas in the forums.  I would vastly prefer that people come up with their own original ideas.

Edited by fizzymagic
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1 hour ago, niraD said:

Interesting. I've heard exactly the opposite advice, to avoid frustrating geocachers who show up at the posted coordinates expecting a traditional cache that they can find, open, close, and replace with no gimmicks or gadgets getting in the way.

I understand your point and I have heard that as well in rare occasions.    Regardless, to get people to visit the gadget cache, calling it a Mystery Cache is the Poison Challis.  Most people avoid mystery caches since the first thought in most minds is an encryption puzzle, internet trivia search or hunting for hidden text on a cache page.   (I personally like these type and am getting better at the tricks to solve them.)   This is why I recommended including the words Gadget Cache in the Title to let everyone know what they are in for.    I personally have never had any negative feedback on a cacher being disappointed in a gadget cache.  As well, if they continue to go after a gadget cache with the name Gadget Cache in the title, well....   Favorite points would be a solid clue that its probably not a pill bottle under a bush..  :)   Don't flame me because I said easy find and replace caches don't get favorite points.    See the Mystery cache paradox from my point of view.   I'm not trying to create havoc, just recommending that if people want to get visits to their Gadget Cache, right or wrong, calling it a mystery cache will keep Gadget-Cache-ophiles away. 

 

1 hour ago, fizzymagic said:

Gadget caches are not traditional caches and should never be listed that way, with the possible exception of gadget containers where the puzzle is just to open the container.

I suppose listing as a multi would be OK, but I prefer mystery caches.  f course, I am not competing for favorite points.

I have a lot of original ideas, and have even built (but not yet deployed) two that are, as far as I know, completely unlike anything out there.  But I am not about to share my original ideas in the forums.  I would vastly prefer that people come up with their own original ideas.

 

Edited by RoombaCats
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42 minutes ago, fizzymagic said:

Gadget caches are not traditional caches and should never be listed that way, with the possible exception of gadget containers where the puzzle is just to open the container.

I suppose listing as a multi would be OK, but I prefer mystery caches.  f course, I am not competing for favorite points.

I have a lot of original ideas, and have even built (but not yet deployed) two that are, as far as I know, completely unlike anything out there.  But I am not about to share my original ideas in the forums.  I would vastly prefer that people come up with their own original ideas.

So all of your gadget caches are listed as Mystery caches?    I clicked on several of your mystery caches and did not see any gadget caches.   The caches I saw are as most people think of mystery caches, online puzzles that need to be solved before they can find the container with no cache at the listed coordinates.   Your mystery caches look really good, and clever, but calling a gadget cache a mystery cache will keep most people away from it even if they like Gadget Caches.    Not saying it is right or wrong, its just the unfortunate reality.    

Anyway, I use to think the same way, my original idea is not to be shared en-mass.   Nevertheless, sharing caches openly inspires others to think in new ways and experiment with new and better ideas.   See what works and try something better.  Look at NW Tim.   He not only shares his ideas but tells everyone how to build them and asks others to copy and improve upon his ideas.    His caches are a staple of their West Virginia county's economy drawing in thousands of geocaching tourists in spite of telling everyone how to solve them.    How can keeping it to yourself be such a good thing if only a few people get to try it compared to the online community. Come on now, I'm sure you were inspired to create gadget and puzzle caches because a cache you found online sparked an new idea.   :)  I applaud your caches, very impressive and many, glad people like you are out there. :)

Edited by RoombaCats
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These have been some of our favorite kind lately. We found several not too far from us. Many of them had (gadget cache) next to their title when I did a search. That search led me to an entire trail of 7 gadget caches, and along the trail, at several of the caches, you had to write down some of the answers to get coordinates for a "bonus cache". It was some of the most fun (and challenging!) we have had with geocaching.

Several have been replicas of WVTim's caches but have their own unique touch.

One was inspired by the game Plinko off The Price is Right and to get into the initial cache box, you had to know a phrase Bob Barker always said at the end of each show. By process of elimination, we guessed the code word. Once inside, you played a game with a marble where when you "win", it knocks this wooden piece down and exposes another code word to open the lock underneath to the cache container and logbook. See below:

Plinko.JPG

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On 7/26/2017 at 1:59 AM, fizzymagic said:

Gadget caches are not traditional caches and should never be listed that way, with the possible exception of gadget containers where the puzzle is just to open the container.

Pardon my noobïveté, but is there any other kind?  :blink:  Fine blurry gray line (IMO) between gadget containers where the puzzle is just to open the [log?] container, and gadget containers where the puzzle is to get to the [log] container.  Or am I misconstruing your meaning?  Is there some other kind of gadget cache?

I love the idea of gadget caches (as I understand them to be); they're probably the determining reason I got interested in GCing, and it's my aspiration to build & hide innovative/original GC² (Is there a unique acronym/abbreviation for them?) of my own.  I say the idea because I haven't actually found one yet, and from the ongoing perusal of caches in my area, it appears I may have to do some considerable traveling to find one.  I've seen many--if not all--of those videoed by cliptwings and RoombaCats (and probably others here--profuse apologies for not recognizing names), and appreciate their ingenuity.

As far as how they should be labeled/listed, I... don't really have an opinion, short of making them a separate cache type, which (not knowing the rationale for why they haven't been) I spoze I'd support.  Short of that, I think there are some valid points on all sides.

 

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42 minutes ago, AB&JB said:

If there is only 1 location and it is listed as the original coordinates, why not make it a traditional and use the "Field Puzzle" attribute?

Ultimately, it comes down to the expectations of the people seeking the cache.

Imagine someone who searches only for traditional caches. What kind of cache experiences are they expecting? Now imagine someone else who searches only for mystery/puzzle caches. What kind of cache experiences are they expecting?

Now consider the cache experience provided by a gadget cache. Is that experience more in line with the expectations of the first person, or with the expectations of the second person?

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6 hours ago, RufusClupea said:

Pardon my noobïveté, but is there any other kind?  :blink:  Fine blurry gray line (IMO) between gadget containers where the puzzle is just to open the [log?] container, and gadget containers where the puzzle is to get to the [log] container.  Or am I misconstruing your meaning?  Is there some other kind of gadget cache?

 

Aha!  I was misunderstanding your meaning.  For me, a "gadget cache" is often one where there is a gadget that gives you the coordinates to the final.  My current ones that are built have not been placed because I can't figure out a good way to keep them safe, as they also include electronics.

 

Yes, a gadget cache where you have to solve the puzzle to open the container could well be listed as a Traditional with the Field Puzzle attribute set.  It all depends on how allergic cachers in your area are to Mystery caches.

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On 7/26/2017 at 0:28 AM, RoombaCats said:

There are some rules I have learned about making gadget caches to get the most favorite points.    1) Help the finder feel like they are making progress.    If there are steps to solving the cache, do it in stages.   2) Make it so the finder has to return the puzzle as it was when they found it.   If you use a mechanism like a slider puzzle to open the cache container, try and make it so that finder must reset the puzzle to close it.    For example my gadget cache called Q-bert  GC5VQ50 in the video below:

This geocache requires the finder to reset the blocks in order to replace the magnetic game piece used to slide the blocks.    3) People prefer easier over harder puzzles.    For example, my grid and template cache  GC78VTG in the picture below is easy to solve by just rotating the grid on either side of the box to get the combination to the lock.  4) People like hints and sometimes flat out spoilers.   My harder caches have a laminated card in a small envelope with the solution to the gadget cache.   They have it in reserve in case they cannot figure it out.   This gets me more favorite points.

grid and template3.JPG

4) Never identify a gadget cache a Mystery Cache, always select Traditional Cache or multi cache (if there are stages) when identifying the cache type.   Most people tend to avoid mystery caches since they tend to require people to solve an encrypted puzzle or coordinate before finding the cache location.   Identify the caches as a Gadget Cache somewhere in the title of the cache name.   This helps.   5)  A lot of people find gadget caches that blend in with the terrain to be the most fun.     Take a look at my "Jurassic Parking" gadget cache  GC6Z8JK   It's called Jurassic Parking since the cache is in the parking lot of a novelty store with lots of concrete and fiberglass dinosaurs in front.

 

6) If you want some really great idea for geocaches, watch a British game show called "The crystal maze" on YouTube.   It reminds me of escape room puzzles.   The quality of the videos is a little grainy and it was produced in the 90s but there are many great idea that can be adapted into gadget caches.    7) look at other gadget caches in your area.   Most people would be flattered if you duplicated their caches or came up with a twist on someone's gadget cache.  I love to hear that people have made a cache like mine and added more ingenuity to it. And finally, 8) Location for the gadget cache is important.    Place the gadget cache in an area where there are other gadget caches.   You will be competing for favorite points, but many people look for clusters of gadget caches in an area and you ultimately get the most traffic and, in turn,  favorite points that way.   Favorite points are a great way to learn what people like and how to design better gadget caches.

Most important, build gadget caches you would like to find.     Chances are, someone will like it as much as you do or more.


 

I would have to ask if some of these caches meet the requirement that no part of the cache be buried?

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6 minutes ago, fizzymagic said:

For me, a "gadget cache" is often one where there is a gadget that gives you the coordinates to the final. 

IC.  That sounds like a multi.  I guess I would see that as the latter type--gadget containers where the puzzle is to get (indirectly in this case) to the [log] container.

6 minutes ago, fizzymagic said:

My current ones that are built have not been placed because I can't figure out a good way to keep them safe, as they also include electronics.

Yes, 'tis a puzzlement.  I'm pondering the same conundrum for when the time comes.  

 

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9 hours ago, niraD said:
10 hours ago, AB&JB said:

If there is only 1 location and it is listed as the original coordinates, why not make it a traditional and use the "Field Puzzle" attribute?

Ultimately, it comes down to the expectations of the people seeking the cache.

Imagine someone who searches only for traditional caches. What kind of cache experiences are they expecting? Now imagine someone else who searches only for mystery/puzzle caches. What kind of cache experiences are they expecting?

Now consider the cache experience provided by a gadget cache. Is that experience more in line with the expectations of the first person, or with the expectations of the second person?

Provided the Field Puzzle attribute is set, the difficulty rated appropriately (at least D2) and the description gives at least a hint that there might be something unusual about the cache, I don't see it being a problem to list it as a traditional. Attributes, ratings and descriptions are there to be used for those who want to limit their searches to easy finds. Much of the enjoyment I get from caching is not knowing what I'll find at GZ and the "guaranteed smiley" philosophy goes against my grain.

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15 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

Provided the Field Puzzle attribute is set, the difficulty rated appropriately (at least D2) and the description gives at least a hint that there might be something unusual about the cache, I don't see it being a problem to list it as a traditional. Attributes, ratings and descriptions are there to be used for those who want to limit their searches to easy finds. Much of the enjoyment I get from caching is not knowing what I'll find at GZ and the "guaranteed smiley" philosophy goes against my grain.

Exactly. A PQ can exclude attributes.

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On 7/28/2017 at 3:26 PM, Harry Dolphin said:

I would have to ask if some of these caches meet the requirement that no part of the cache be buried?

These were all approved by the reviewer so I can assume they are not considered buried.    In the desert, there is not much option if it's bigger than a micro.  There is rarely anywhere to hide a larger cache.

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I'm not sure if this would be considered as a gadget cache or not, but I made a cache container (disguised as birdhouse shaped like a rabbit, GC5ngtg) that had an ear that was held on by a magnet.  If you pulled on the ear (see hint) you gained access to the inside of the birdhouse.  Inside the house was a wireless doorbell dinger.  About 100 feet away from the birdhouse was a stump that I had hollowed out that contained the cache and the doorbell ringer.  You had to reach into the house, take the dinger in hand, press the button and follow the sound to the real cache.  People seemed to like it, but sadly it was destroyed in a wildfire.  Once we get back to normal I'll be putting out caches again.

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8 hours ago, RoombaCats said:

These were all approved by the reviewer so I can assume they are not considered buried.    In the desert, there is not much option if it's bigger than a micro.  There is rarely anywhere to hide a larger cache.

Besides their opinions of a certain cache type, maybe possible issues is why caches aren't "approved", but published.    :)

Reviewers don't personally inspect the caches before published, and instead publish them with the CO's word  that they meet/abide by guidelines.

 - That doesn't always happen...

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On ‎7‎/‎30‎/‎2017 at 8:07 PM, cerberus1 said:

Besides their opinions of a certain cache type, maybe possible issues is why caches aren't "approved", but published.    :)

Reviewers don't personally inspect the caches before published, and instead publish them with the CO's word  that they meet/abide by guidelines.

 - That doesn't always happen...

1) I always disclose the way my caches are placed and provide detailed pictures of the cache in place at the location.   2)  My take is that buried implies a shovel or digging is needed to extract the container.     3)  I know that some reviewers (East coast) do considered this type of cache to be buried and would not approve it.   It is a grey area obviously.   In my area (Southern California), as long as there is access to the cache above ground, and there are no finder complaints, there is not an issue.   Most caches here, if bigger than a small container, are concealed, at least partially, below ground level.   The clever ones, made to look like the surrounding environment.  

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23 hours ago, RoombaCats said:

1) I always disclose the way my caches are placed and provide detailed pictures of the cache in place at the location.   2)  My take is that buried implies a shovel or digging is needed to extract the container.     3)  I know that some reviewers (East coast) do considered this type of cache to be buried and would not approve it.   It is a grey area obviously.   In my area (Southern California), as long as there is access to the cache above ground, and there are no finder complaints, there is not an issue.   Most caches here, if bigger than a small container, are concealed, at least partially, below ground level.   The clever ones, made to look like the surrounding environment.  

If buried containers are okay in a SoCal, but not in the rest of the World, I can't see how that would be a "gray area"...

 - Maybe I missed it, but I couldn't find anything in the guidelines saying that they don't include SoCal .  :)

"...and there are no finder complaints"  should even tell you it is an issue.

I'd think a truly clever cache would be one not needing to be buried.;)

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23 hours ago, cerberus1 said:

If buried containers are okay in a SoCal, but not in the rest of the World, I can't see how that would be a "gray area"...

 - Maybe I missed it, but I couldn't find anything in the guidelines saying that they don't include SoCal .  :)

"...and there are no finder complaints"  should even tell you it is an issue.

I'd think a truly clever cache would be one not needing to be buried.;)

Okay we'll change 70% of the gadget caches in California if it will make you happy.  You will be in charge of turning them into truly clever caches so they don't need to be buried.  

 

Edited by RoombaCats
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52 minutes ago, RoombaCats said:

Okay we'll change 70% of the gadget caches in California if it will make you happy.  You will be in charge of turning them into truly clever caches so they don't need to be buried.  

 

 

I haven't seen everything, but I've never seen a gadget cache that was buried. They are hidden in plain sight, or not “hidden” at all. Caches such as a “bird house” where there are hidden latches, or a large plexiglas-covered maze to work a ball through. One is a chest of drawers, distress painted and against the brick wall of an old store, and right next to a sidewalk. I walked past it several times, but open it up and inside is a fascinating electrical puzzle. When any of those are archived, there's no hole to fill in. Nobody sees those and thinks how cool it will be to dig up hiding spots for their own caches.  I never consider digging a hole for the cache as a tricky method of making a cache.  I won't even nail a birdhouse to a tree.  Most of my cache work is about designing a better way.

One I have found is a 5-gallon paint bucket. Years ago, it was buried up to its pry-off lid. Today it's an open pit with the current paint bucket and its loose-fitting lid sitting in there, with another container inside it in an attempt to keep items from getting soaked. The pit fills with muddy water at times. Yeah, nobody complains, go figure. But once archived, there will be a lot of work making that look like no cache was there. That's not even a gadget cache. It's a container in mud. It would be even messier as a puzzle.

 

Edited by kunarion
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It sounds like you are figuring out why partial ground concealment is acceptable in California, or at least the desert.    It's dry and there are no trees to nail a birdhouse to.  The only indigenous trees we have are joshua trees.  They are endangered and protected.  Attaching a birdhouse to one of these would freak people out.  We are not even allowed to collect the dead trees as firewood so using even a dead tree to hide a cache would freak people out.  I appreciate your point of view but it's not all forested areas and abandoned dressers out there

Edited by RoombaCats
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3 minutes ago, on4bam said:

Still don't understand the obsession about not burying caches... Many caches here are hidden as shown in the video above, just lift the lid and grab the container, no digging needed. B)

 

The 5-gallon bucket I mentioned also had "no digging needed".  Yet the dirt that once surrounded it was removed over time, to reveal an open pit.  I understand the obsession about not burying caches.

 

Edited by kunarion
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33 minutes ago, RoombaCats said:

It sounds like you are figuring out why partial ground concealment is acceptable in California, or at least the desert.    It's dry and there are no trees to nail a birdhouse to.  The only indigenous trees we have are joshua trees.  They are endangered and protected.  Attaching a birdhouse to one of these would freak people out.  We are not even allowed to collect the dead trees as firewood so using even a dead tree to hide a cache would freak people out.  I appreciate your point of view but it's not all forested areas and abandoned dressers out there

While I've chained birdhouses to trees, I do not nail them on as that too is a rule violation.  Most of the birdhouse gadgets are placed on stumps or 4x4 posts.   Because 4x4 posts require digging I've always informed the land owners that the post isn't part of the gadget, and will be left behind if the gadget is removed so that they can install a real birdhouse or sign on it, which I'm happy to do if they request it.

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