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Power Trails - pros and cons...


WearyTraveler
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I've mixed feelings about PTs.


  •  
  • They're great for adding numbers - it that's what you're about.
  • They're frequently poorly maintained - as COs set them and forget them
  • They provide a needed (?) break from tromping through the woods
  • Theyre fun to do with a couple of buddies - kinda like a Chinese fire drill every tenth of a mile.

I've only done a small number of portions of PTs. A couple were fun and others pretty much sucked...

 

I know that I don't want to maintain 50 caches along a highway, so I'd doubt I'll plant one.

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I like using powertrails as a training activity when I run. Even more fun to drop a pen at mile 1 and you're at mile 2 and have to go back. Lol. I agree they can be poorly maintained but that also could be because alot of people frequent them and aren't placing them back properly etc. I feel fortunate that we have a number of decent powertrails in my area that the COs do take care if and are mostly different from each other so it can be really fun to walk and cache at the same time.

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I logged a couple series of power trails by car over the Columbus Day weekend a few years back. Got 74 one day, 100 the next. I burned out on that real quick. I suppose if someone had a gun to my head and my options were either a 24-hour binge on the E.T. Highway or death, I'd choose E.T. Highway, but otherwise I have little interest in repeating the experience.

 

(Since I try not to do copy and paste logs, the logging experience was pretty numbing as well.)

 

Since then I've decided that, if I'm going to log a power trail, I'll do it on foot and get some exercise out of it. Had a great time doing so when I was training for a marathon-length ruck march last year, and am currently logging a 50-mile series along a bike trail that goes from Jamestown to Richmond, VA, a mile or two at a time. I may finish it before we move in summer 2018, I may not. We'll see how it goes.

 

It helps if the series is well maintained. The ones I've done on foot have been taken care of. If I had any indication that they weren't, I'd slap them all onto an ignore list and find somewhere else to go find caches.

Edited by hzoi
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My first experience with a power trail was at a Mega event. Convoys of vehicles stopping along a highway and pulling back out into traffic every 528 feet made me too nervous to take part. I believe that most of the custom containers were kept for souvenirs and traded out with pill bottles. :laughing:

 

I'm glad the VDOT banned geocaching on their property to keep those stinking power trails off their guardrails. :D

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Nine times outta ten, if I want to go to a nice hike-to cache, there's a "dropped on my way to..." power trail to it now.

Depends on my mood whether I hit some, or skip 'em entirely.

 

Yeah, it's nice when a good trail fills in over time with a variety of interesting caches, but 15 identical caches hidden at identical intervals isn't particularly interesting. I don't mind power trails as much when they're along bike paths or roads. Personally I can take them or leave them, but they're in spaces that otherwise wouldn't have geocaches anyway so it doesn't feel like such a waste.

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Did one in TN / VA (Bristol) last month. The road was so busy that I spent more time waiting to get back on the street than I did driving or caching. Way too busy - and this was a workday morning! I finally gave up and drove past the tail end.

 

There's the bike trail near Martinsburg WV that I did years ago. Enjoyed it back then. It's since really filled in. I'm considering going through it again to catch the new caches. But these old legs are screaming NO!

 

I'd like to find a walking PT not far from home. That sounds interesting. Only problem is what one walks one way, must walk the other... :unsure:

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I have one "power trail" near me along the Erie Canal, but you can't use a car to grab them. You have to bike, boat or walk.

 

I was in a desert region last year, and I see why power trails are popular out there. When there is no vegetation higher than 2 feet within 5 square miles, guardrails, stop signs and light poles become attractive options to attach caches to. Its also hard to attach a cache to a tumbleweed.

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I'd like to find a walking PT not far from home. That sounds interesting. Only problem is what one walks one way, must walk the other... :unsure:

The trick is to skip every other cache on the way out, then get 'em on your way back.

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I'd like to find a walking PT not far from home. That sounds interesting. Only problem is what one walks one way, must walk the other... :unsure:
The trick is to skip every other cache on the way out, then get 'em on your way back.
Or just skip all but the furthest unfound cache on the trail, and save the rest for another day.
  • Upvote 1
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I'd like to find a walking PT not far from home. That sounds interesting. Only problem is what one walks one way, must walk the other... :unsure:

The trick is to skip every other cache on the way out, then get 'em on your way back.

:P

Well, it's not next door to you, but there's a great trail of caches along the ridge at Masanutten. If you get a ride to the trail head, you can take the ski lift down.

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Pros and cons. Hmm... I started on one. 138 caches by the vacant owner (missing for a year), plus 40 or 50 by other cachers. The section I was on was a paved trail: foot or bicycle only. It's a pretty area along a canal. I did two miles each way. Found eleven caches. DNFed 3. (The next cacher found two of them, and threw down one.) All micros. Mostly throw downs. Some pretty scuzzy. Mostly under rocks, and there are a lot of rocks. I thought the throw down magnetic cache under the bench, when photos show a pill bottle behind the electric pole, was a humorous throw down. Few trees, no shade, and it was hot out at 83°. Interesting area, but not interesting caches. Not sure if I will return.

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I am not sure what is powerful about "power trails" so I prefer to call them "repetitive trails." I did a hundred or so caches on the original ET trail and found that it was enough. Repetition gave way to numbness and there were other things we wanted to do that day. So I thought it was enough to say I was there without getting too carried away. As it was, once we got home my wife complained about the time it took to log the finds - but in its own way writing a separate log for each cache was a creative exercise. So there was that.

 

The last time we were in the area, there were cachers along the highway. My wife asked me if I wanted to stop . . . but no. I have enough smileys and there was too much else to do as we searched for petroglyphs, fossils, camo dudes, ghost towns, and the like.

 

These days I ignore all the rows of green. It's pretty much a matter of priorities. The trails I find powerful usually involve nice hike, bike, or kayak in search of a few caches. Maybe only one. Life is too short to stop every 528 feet. But if you have other priorities I wish you well.

Edited by geodarts
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The old-school power trails that evolved as popular hiking/biking trails were gradually saturated with caches placed by different owners, with different styles of caches, are great places to take beginners to introduce them to geocaching. There's one near here that the county parks department uses for its intro geocaching classes. New geocachers can find 8 or 10 varied caches and be back at the trailhead in time for lunch.

 

The modern numbers run trails with fungible containers every 528ft/161m are good for boosting your numbers quickly. Full stop.

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The modern numbers run trails with fungible containers every 528ft/161m are good for boosting your numbers quickly. Full stop.

I've never done a power trail and don't have much urge to do one, either, but from what I've seen, many people that do power trails have a lot of fun doing them. They may start out just for numbers -- I wouldn't know -- but, nevertheless, many enjoy the experience just as much as a good hike into the woods although for different reasons.

 

Saying such power trails are good only for boosting your numbers is like saying running a marathon is good only for saying you did it.

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I did a good chunk of the ET Hwy back in 2014. I think we got 2200+ finds over the course of 3 days including 1522 in a stretch from midnight to midnight on 5/9/14. It was utterly insane and I have no desire to ever do anything like that again even though I can look back at it as a fond memory. It helped to be with a good group of friends. I could not imagine doing anything like that alone. After an hour or two I'd want to just quit and go home.

 

About a month ago I did a short trail down in Florida. It consisted of an ammo can every quarter mile that was 40-200' into the woods from the side of a dirt road. I think there were about 20 caches in that string and I felt somewhat relieved when I had it completed. Kind of an odd feeling to have considering I was doing it for fun.

 

I do like power trails along hiking trails thru the woods. There is an area about 90 minutes from my house where my dog can run free and there are about 200 caches scattered on miles and miles of hiking trails. I've done about 2/3 of it and I'm planning to go back on Memorial Day weekend to see if I can clear out whatever remains.

 

Pros: Good for numbers, good exercise (if you are hiking or biking), good comradery, it can bring revenue to local economies.

Cons: You might hate yourself in the morning.

Edited by Team Dennis
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The power trail ethic is generally: "If it's not there a replacement can be signed, placed, and logged." Which is common and encouraged by most PT owners. This ethic has seeped into the rest of the game.

 

Some other things that have seeped into the rest of the game because of the culture of PTs:

  • Throwdowns. Bring some presigned film canisters or pill bottles with you. Grab the film canister that's in the bush and drop a pre-signed canister. Rinse and repeat.
  • Lack of maintenance. Plant hundreds of caches and don't worry about maintenance, someone will throwdown a cache. Move so far away that you can't visit you caches, then harass anyone who logs an NM or NA while you wait for a numbers power cacher to throwdown a cache.
  • Saturation. PTs have encouraged saturation of parks and trails by one owner or a team.
  • Changed the definition of a find. Finds include caches you didn't find, i.e. caches the finder brought with them to leave if the cache is missing, or caches your 'team' had found but individual "finders" may not have searched for or viewed.
  • The find count became a commodity. PTs sanctioned and encouraged competition--the more smileys the better.
  • Turned the pastime/hobby into predominantly a numbers game/sport.
  • Caches on or near power trails that are not part of the PT are swallowed up. Logs thank the PT owner for a cache that doesn't belong to the PT owner. The individual cache owner gets his cache treated to the same cut n paste logs that the PT caches get.
  • Cut n paste logs. Their good for PT caches, so they're good for all caches.
  • Impact. PTs turned a low impact, low visibility activity into a high impact, high visibility game.
  • In large part because of PTs caching has evolved from "let me show you something you might not know about" to "let me hide as much as I can".

Edited by L0ne.R
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I'm not a big fan of power trails but I end up doing most of my caching this way lately. I take long walks/hikes on the weekend and the rails-to-trails and state trails here in Wisconsin are usually packed full of caches. When I start my walk, I will usually find a handful right away and then I'll just start choosing a cache that is a mile or so distant and skip the others in between unless one of the ones in between is a higher difficulty/terrain cache. Otherwise, the skipped caches tend to be the same "filler" cache every 528'. So is the cache I choose a mile away but it doesn't bother me since it breaks up my walk nicely. Or sometimes I just start hitting every cache for the next mile or two. I can be moody that way.

 

It is kind of frustrating because there tends to be two kinds of PT's: one grows over time with different owners/containers and the others are placed with the express purpose of placing a cache every .10th of a mile. The older trails have more variety and hiding styles but the caches tend to not be maintained well and some are downright junk. The new trails are pretty much without thought or difficulty with some rare exceptions, of course. Usually it's the same bison tube or micro hanging from a branch every 528'. I use caching as a relaxing hobby, so it doesn't bother me too much about the junky containers or the monotony but I certainly would be happier with better, more creative caches.

 

I usually don't (or won't) find more than 20 caches in a day of hiking. I care about my logs and even though some (most?) of these PT caches don't really deserve better, I do my best to write a meaningful log for every cache I find. It is a real grind to come up with something to say about some totally bland, forgettable cache. That's why my limit is around 20 caches a day. After that, I would probably go the TFTC route. I mean, I KNOW that in all likelihood, the CO set up a dummy email account and no matter what gibberish or poetry I wrote, they wouldn't read it anyway. I get that but I still write logs for myself so even writing just a single sentence for a lame cache feels like I'm being disrespectful. So, really, what keeps me from doing power trails and finding dozens or hundreds of caches at a time is the fact that it would be torture to write those logs. I'm very easy to please as far as finding caches goes but, for me, writing the log is part of the full caching experience.

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There are some powertrails that are dozens of caches going on for dozens of miles. Those can take a while, and I agree encourage cut-n-paste logs. Themed power trails with up to 100 caches or so are alright because they are a series and will have various hiding places and theres a variety of hiding locations and could be completed in a reasonable amount of time. The 100 miles long powertrail is too complicated to keep track of and plan, at least to me!

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I usually don't (or won't) find more than 20 caches in a day of hiking. I care about my logs and even though some (most?) of these PT caches don't really deserve better, I do my best to write a meaningful log for every cache I find. It is a real grind to come up with something to say about some totally bland, forgettable cache. That's why my limit is around 20 caches a day. After that, I would probably go the TFTC route. I mean, I KNOW that in all likelihood, the CO set up a dummy email account and no matter what gibberish or poetry I wrote, they wouldn't read it anyway. I get that but I still write logs for myself so even writing just a single sentence for a lame cache feels like I'm being disrespectful. So, really, what keeps me from doing power trails and finding dozens or hundreds of caches at a time is the fact that it would be torture to write those logs. I'm very easy to please as far as finding caches goes but, for me, writing the log is part of the full caching experience.

 

Love this. It's what I do too. And it is a way to pace myself and not overdo it.

I will even write via the app at the scene (which is what I liked to do on paper back in the old days when logbooks were the norm--write my fresh impressions at the cache). Which means I tend to take about 20 minutes at each cache, which slows things down and limits the number of caches I do in a day.

 

I do it for me, I do it for the next finders--if they are the type to read the latest logs, I do it for the hider--if they are the type to actual care, and I do it because I think it ups the value of the pastime to treat each cache with some genuine acknowledgement.

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My question about power trails, is from a hiders viewpoint. I spend a lot of time and consideration on most of my hides....I look forward to the found logs and hopefully favorite points for my effort. Cut and paste ,or "TFTC" logs would drive me batty. What is the incentive for power trail COs?

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My question about power trails, is from a hiders viewpoint. I spend a lot of time and consideration on most of my hides....I look forward to the found logs and hopefully favorite points for my effort. Cut and paste ,or "TFTC" logs would drive me batty. What is the incentive for power trail COs?

 

I can't think of a really good incentive for a PT CO's GRC string. Honestly, how many ways can one log "nice guard rail."

Now - for a PT that has numerous types of containers and locations along a trail, yes, I understand and would try to make my logs reflect.

I did a trail in TN a while ago. It was along a highway but just a few were GR. Many required tromping around in the bush and one was even a mailbox in the woods. I handed out a bunch of nice logs and fav points. But the stop signs and GRs, they got the canned thanks message.

 

There are seekers out the people who try to leave great logs and others that no matter how cool the cache is, are going to TFTC TNLN...

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My question about power trails, is from a hiders viewpoint. I spend a lot of time and consideration on most of my hides....I look forward to the found logs and hopefully favorite points for my effort. Cut and paste ,or "TFTC" logs would drive me batty. What is the incentive for power trail COs?

 

Popularity. A CO that places a PT that allows others to rack up a massive amount of finds is held in high regard because the game has become all about the numbers.

 

 

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My question about power trails, is from a hiders viewpoint. I spend a lot of time and consideration on most of my hides....I look forward to the found logs and hopefully favorite points for my effort. Cut and paste ,or "TFTC" logs would drive me batty. What is the incentive for power trail COs?

 

Popularity. A CO that places a PT that allows others to rack up a massive amount of finds is held in high regard because the game has become all about the numbers.

 

While I'm sure that there are a bunch of PT chasers only interested in the count, I'm confident (hopeful) that there's a large percentage that are not.

 

While I'm by no means a purist, I like to up my numbers but I also enjoy a challenge. Yesterday I did "Chimney Top Cache." One cache and it was all. Exhausting hike and beautiful scenery.

 

There's always going to be cachers that head out to the ET / desert caches, and yes - PT owners will be very popular, but I think a larger portion won't.

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My question about power trails, is from a hiders viewpoint. I spend a lot of time and consideration on most of my hides....I look forward to the found logs and hopefully favorite points for my effort. Cut and paste ,or "TFTC" logs would drive me batty. What is the incentive for power trail COs?

I can only imagine, but I assume it's the same primary incentive as for any other cache: so other people can enjoy them.

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My question about power trails, is from a hiders viewpoint. I spend a lot of time and consideration on most of my hides....I look forward to the found logs and hopefully favorite points for my effort. Cut and paste ,or "TFTC" logs would drive me batty. What is the incentive for power trail COs?

 

Popularity. A CO that places a PT that allows others to rack up a massive amount of finds is held in high regard because the game has become all about the numbers.

 

How sad. Then that takes away from "quality" caches. Sometimes in my area, I wonder why I even try. But I get it..we all want something else. I will take one great cache hide over 100 PT hides. But, that is just me.

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:blink: I've been around since 2002 & have not hit 3000 caches. So I'm not into the numbers game just having fun with friends now & again.

 

I may do a Power Trail but 'Do I have the time?', now that's the question I ask my self. It's just a game & I chose to play it my way. Just go have fun on your terms & smile. :rolleyes:

 

Oh, look there's a cache over there, nay maybe another day. Now that Peak is a different story...... :anibad:

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What is the incentive for power trail COs?

I think it's to have others find them, as most COs. :)

Most we know who place that type of hide are in this "game" for find counts too.

 

"Floats your boat" kinda thing I guess.

 

At the last event attended, I was asked why I don't do pmo caches any longer.

Using his phone, showed him 5 pmo guard rail & parking lot hides COs placed, that are no different than any other.

I've always wondered why a CO would do that, but figure that's simply the way they wanna play. :)

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...... I was asked why I don't do pmo caches any longer.

Using his phone, showed him 5 pmo guard rail & parking lot hides COs placed, that are no different than any other.

I've always wondered why a CO would do that, but figure that's simply the way they wanna play. :)

 

Maybe they made it PMO to reduce visitor numbers a bit, reducing maintenance requirements and chances of muggling?

 

 

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My question about power trails, is from a hiders viewpoint. I spend a lot of time and consideration on most of my hides....I look forward to the found logs and hopefully favorite points for my effort. Cut and paste ,or "TFTC" logs would drive me batty. What is the incentive for power trail COs?

 

Popularity. A CO that places a PT that allows others to rack up a massive amount of finds is held in high regard because the game has become all about the numbers.

 

How sad. Then that takes away from "quality" caches. Sometimes in my area, I wonder why I even try. But I get it..we all want something else. I will take one great cache hide over 100 PT hides. But, that is just me.

 

I'll take 'me both! 101 smileys! :P

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I was asked to participate in a "power trail" over the weekend and actually agreed to do so. My main gripe with an undertaking like this is that I always try to write individual logs that talk about the experience of walking to a cache and searching for it. Since I don't just copy and paste those logs, logging usually takes a fair amount of time if I found more than a few caches a day. I just can't see myself doing this for 50+ caches that were basically almost the same hide with a cache listing that is just a few lines long. I think in this case I would have to opt for a copy and paste log, which I normally don't like, but since the cache owner basically did the same thing by placing "Copy and paste hides" I guess it would be justified.

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I was asked to participate in a "power trail" over the weekend and actually agreed to do so. My main gripe with an undertaking like this is that I always try to write individual logs that talk about the experience of walking to a cache and searching for it. Since I don't just copy and paste those logs, logging usually takes a fair amount of time if I found more than a few caches a day. I just can't see myself doing this for 50+ caches that were basically almost the same hide with a cache listing that is just a few lines long. I think in this case I would have to opt for a copy and paste log, which I normally don't like, but since the cache owner basically did the same thing by placing "Copy and paste hides" I guess it would be justified.

I know how you feel. I'm one of the more verbose loggers. But actual power trails are different. No one looks at the logs. It's perfectly reasonable to do a cute&paste. You don't have to justify it. Unless you're some kind of super human, you won't remember any details from any one PT cache, anyway. (On the other hand, if you do remember the details, I'm completely fine with you tweaking everyone's nose by writing normal logs. Just don't expect anyone to read them.)

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On PTs if a cache has problems or a unique experience I jot a note in my app for when I compose them online (to include as text or post as NM). For what it's worth to followup cachers. If I have a problem with an individual cache on the trail, I may check past logs, but it usually ends up quick skim-scrolling until something pops out as unique to the cache, and potentailly helpful.

Otherwise, yep it typically becomes copy/paste (as much as would expected by the CO). I do my best to make logs unique for each find, but PTs are generally the exception. For a great day, I may end up writing a longer log for the whole experience on the first cache (the one most people would view if any), and link to it on the others before adding anything specific to each.

 

I often comment that PTs are like one longer cache-finding experience, rather than a cache-specific finding experience. It's a different find mentality. It's for some, and not for others. Personally I prefer PTs with themes, whether in listing or cache hide/container. But even with "boring" power trails, the experience can be saved by doing them with friends and having a great time in that sense. Nice hike, nice company. :)

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I was asked to participate in a "power trail" over the weekend and actually agreed to do so. My main gripe with an undertaking like this is that I always try to write individual logs that talk about the experience of walking to a cache and searching for it. Since I don't just copy and paste those logs, logging usually takes a fair amount of time if I found more than a few caches a day. I just can't see myself doing this for 50+ caches that were basically almost the same hide with a cache listing that is just a few lines long. I think in this case I would have to opt for a copy and paste log, which I normally don't like, but since the cache owner basically did the same thing by placing "Copy and paste hides" I guess it would be justified.

I know how you feel. I'm one of the more verbose loggers. But actual power trails are different. No one looks at the logs. It's perfectly reasonable to do a cute&paste. You don't have to justify it. Unless you're some kind of super human, you won't remember any details from any one PT cache, anyway. (On the other hand, if you do remember the details, I'm completely fine with you tweaking everyone's nose by writing normal logs. Just don't expect anyone to read them.)

I don't worry too much about verbose logs on PT type caches. You're correct, they're mass produced and probably not followed too closely by COs. But I did a streak of caches along a highway where a couple were pretty cool so I didlogs talking about the cache etc... so it's "some are, some aren't..."

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I was asked to participate in a "power trail" over the weekend and actually agreed to do so.

- snip -

I think in this case I would have to opt for a copy and paste log, which I normally don't like, but since the cache owner basically did the same thing by placing "Copy and paste hides" I guess it would be justified.

Similar, we prefer a wordy log of our experience.

No "power trails" for me (yet), but if we find a few of the many "placed on my way to..." caches (every 530'...) while heading to the fun one at the end, they now get a copy/paste "found on the way to..." log from us. :D

Most know what kinda logs we normally write, haven't said anything, so I believe you're correct. :)

Edited by cerberus1
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I often comment that PTs are like one longer cache-finding experience, rather than a cache-specific finding experience.
And yet, when a new cache type was proposed that would treat such trails as a single entity (a single listing but multiple containers, and multiple smileys for a single log), the fans of such trails argued that it was important for each container to have its own listing.
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I often comment that PTs are like one longer cache-finding experience, rather than a cache-specific finding experience.
And yet, when a new cache type was proposed that would treat such trails as a single entity (a single listing but multiple containers, and multiple smileys for a single log), the fans of such trails argued that it was important for each container to have its own listing.

 

Hmmm... there's already a type that covers multiple containers... it's called a multi. PTs would be the multi from hell...

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I often comment that PTs are like one longer cache-finding experience, rather than a cache-specific finding experience.
And yet, when a new cache type was proposed that would treat such trails as a single entity (a single listing but multiple containers, and multiple smileys for a single log), the fans of such trails argued that it was important for each container to have its own listing.
Hmmm... there's already a type that covers multiple containers... it's called a multi. PTs would be the multi from hell...
Or maybe the multi from heaven.

 

One of the common complaints I've heard about multis in general is that you get only one smiley after finding multiple stages. With this proposed new type, you get a smiley for each stage you find.

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I often comment that PTs are like one longer cache-finding experience, rather than a cache-specific finding experience.
And yet, when a new cache type was proposed that would treat such trails as a single entity (a single listing but multiple containers, and multiple smileys for a single log), the fans of such trails argued that it was important for each container to have its own listing.
Hmmm... there's already a type that covers multiple containers... it's called a multi. PTs would be the multi from hell...
Or maybe the multi from heaven.

 

One of the common complaints I've heard about multis in general is that you get only one smiley after finding multiple stages. With this proposed new type, you get a smiley for each stage you find.

 

While I'm not _all_ about the numbers, I do like the numbers! So a smiley per cache / stage would work...

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I think Groundspeak has already answered the mail on that by (1) not creating a new power trail cache type despite multiple requests and (2) eliminating the possibility of logging the same cache more than once.

 

While we're still adjusting to the new log page, we do like the elimination of multiple caching, we have accidentally logged one more than once before and didn't realize it until later.

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I think Groundspeak has already answered the mail on that by (1) not creating a new power trail cache type despite multiple requests and (2) eliminating the possibility of logging the same cache more than once.

 

While we're still adjusting to the new log page, we do like the elimination of multiple caching, we have accidentally logged one more than once before and didn't realize it until later.

 

There's a fiery thread on that. Lots of interesting "discussion..."

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