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GPS WiFi Boosting


K.E.P.
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Hi All,

 

I've been geocaching for a couple of years and use both a garmin gps tracker and my android phone for caching. However, I use the GPS less because I have to pre-load the caches I'm aiming for, meaning I have to chose them in advance. When I'm out and about, I rarely stick to a plan and often end up wandering off track, whether urban or rural. Not really a problem in towns and cities but on the moors or in the woods, I may not have the cache pre-loaded on my GPS, and can't get signal on my phone.

 

So, here is my question: how do I boost the gps/wifi signal in my phone so I can be a spontaneous cacher, rather than having to stick to a pre-laid plan? Is there even a way yet?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Kate

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"can't get signal on my phone..... how do I boost the gps/wifi signal in my phone "

 

The issue with using your smartphone to cache outside of urban areas is not GPS signal or wifi, it's connectivity to the cellphone's network.

Gps signal is coming down from satellites, and wifi is a strictly local radio signal, usually limited to a few hundred feet.

 

Boosting your network connection may be explained by the phone maker or by the network. It may take a different phone, or a different network

 

Sorry, that's such a weak answer. Here's an article on this, not much help for a geocaching, really, as you are where you are....

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So, here is my question: how do I boost the gps/wifi signal in my phone so I can be a spontaneous cacher, rather than having to stick to a pre-laid plan? Is there even a way yet?

 

GPS & Wifi are different as is Cellular. Wifi is internet access like cellular and you won't have wifi in the woods. You can have cellular in the woods but that depends on your cellular carrier and their coverage. GPS should work anywhere though overhead cover like dense trees can cause your GPS signal to degrade similar to being inside a home or building.

 

There's not much to do to increase your cellular service which would provide internet access. Whats more important when caching is your GPS reception and if that is weak on your phone (which phone do you have?) you can introduce a standalone GPS that could act like your existing handheld GPS and feed the signal to your phone. An example of this would be something similar to https://bad-elf.com/pages/be-gps-2200-detail or https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/p/109827 .

 

Even with the above my suggestion as others have echoed above, since you already have a handheld GPS, would be to load it up with more caches then you currently are via Pocket Queries (PQs) and use the handheld you already have.

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Hi All,

 

I've been geocaching for a couple of years and use both a garmin gps tracker and my android phone for caching. However, I use the GPS less because I have to pre-load the caches I'm aiming for, meaning I have to chose them in advance. When I'm out and about, I rarely stick to a plan and often end up wandering off track, whether urban or rural. Not really a problem in towns and cities but on the moors or in the woods, I may not have the cache pre-loaded on my GPS, and can't get signal on my phone.

 

So, here is my question: how do I boost the gps/wifi signal in my phone so I can be a spontaneous cacher, rather than having to stick to a pre-laid plan? Is there even a way yet?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Kate

 

you don't need pocket queries. that is for offline devices. what you need is an application that can store waypoints , tracks, routes, and caches, in a logical way. i have about 14,000 caches saved in locus (Android app) database, 5-6000 waypoints, and i think 7000 miles of routes/tracks.

 

before i leave to go hiking, I'll download 4-500 caches for that area... if the plans change, I'll download more on the way. i never download while in the woods, that's when it's time for playing.

 

...but you asked about boosting GPS and wifi.

 

gps: I've never found a place that didn't have good triangulation, besides tunnels and caves. if your device has poor triangulation, you can buy a "bad elf" for about the same price as updating to a better phone.

 

for wifi.... well there isn't much wifi in the woods. i would suggest using cellular for on the fly downloads, and using a sim card with the best coverage for where you plan to live. unlocked phones are extremely flexible now a days, and allow for lots of carriers service.

 

normally I'll use "airplane mode" while in the woods, so i won't be interrupted and the battery will last all day long.

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Hi All,

 

I've been geocaching for a couple of years and use both a garmin gps tracker and my android phone for caching. However, I use the GPS less because I have to pre-load the caches I'm aiming for, meaning I have to chose them in advance. When I'm out and about, I rarely stick to a plan and often end up wandering off track, whether urban or rural. Not really a problem in towns and cities but on the moors or in the woods, I may not have the cache pre-loaded on my GPS, and can't get signal on my phone.

 

So, here is my question: how do I boost the gps/wifi signal in my phone so I can be a spontaneous cacher, rather than having to stick to a pre-laid plan? Is there even a way yet?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Kate

 

you don't need pocket queries. that is for offline devices. what you need is an application that can store waypoints , tracks, routes, and caches, in a logical way. i have about 14,000 caches saved in locus (Android app) database, 5-6000 waypoints, and i think 7000 miles of routes/tracks.

 

before i leave to go hiking, I'll download 4-500 caches for that area... if the plans change, I'll download more on the way. i never download while in the woods, that's when it's time for playing.

 

...but you asked about boosting GPS and wifi.

 

gps: I've never found a place that didn't have good triangulation, besides tunnels and caves. if your device has poor triangulation, you can buy a "bad elf" for about the same price as updating to a better phone.

 

for wifi.... well there isn't much wifi in the woods. i would suggest using cellular for on the fly downloads, and using a sim card with the best coverage for where you plan to live. unlocked phones are extremely flexible now a days, and allow for lots of carriers service.

 

normally I'll use "airplane mode" while in the woods, so i won't be interrupted and the battery will last all day long.

 

To me, this boils down to how one prepares for some geocaching where access to GPS satellites, a cellular connection, or wifi is an unknown.

If one only has a GPS, there is no expectation that cache data can be downloaded while in the field. All cache and map data must be preloaded. When using a GPS, as long as a clear view of a large portion of the sky, you're going to be able to navigate to any caches that have been pre-loaded. Heavy tree cover or being in the middle of a city with tall buildings can reduce accuracy but that is something that you can see or easily predict by looking at a map.

With a smart phone, there is an expectation that you be able to get cache data (and map data) in real time. Although many cellular providers have coverage maps they're primarily for marketing purposes and it may be difficult to predict whether or not one will be able to get cache data for a specific cache. You can't tell by looking at the sky whether or not you'll have a cell signal and be able to get on the fly cache downloads. When gets in the habit of not pre-downloading cache data to a phone before going out there is a risk that your going to get to an area where there isn't cellular access. Ohgood mitigates that risk by pre-downloading data, just as one with a GPS would be required to do. That also allows using the phone in airplane mode to save some battery life.

An unlocked phone might allow one to use sim cards for a different network, but not all sim cards are going to provide data service (and when they do it may be very limited). For someone traveling to another country that means some additional preparation and cost may be required. I've never bothered to purchase/rent a sim card when traveling and will just make sure that my GPS has been pre-loaded with cache and map data for a broad area where I am going to be. I can't imagine ever needing to have 14K caches pre-loaded and typically creating a few PQs so that the total # of cache is under 1000 is more than I would ever need.

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How do you have a 14k cache database downloaded if you don't use PQs?

 

An app API app can download cache details directly and store them offline, doesn't need a PQ.

 

Well sure, but the comment in the reply was "you don't need pocket queries. that is for offline devices" so I'm wondering what was meant as the original poster has an offline device - their handheld GPS.

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If you root the phone, break the security placed by the developer's. You can find apps that will lock to a GPS signal quicker. As far as boosting a GPS signal, that is the hardware of the phone. Get a newer phone with better hardware. Gotta have root access before you can do any modifications to a smartphone. All root access does is give you access to the phone system. Becareful you can brick a phone if you don't know what you're doing.

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you don't need pocket queries.

 

before i leave to go hiking, I'll download 4-500 caches for that area

How do you have a 14k cache database downloaded if you don't use PQs?

 

set the center of the map you desire to have caches for, and tell it to download 1, 10, 100, or 500 or whatever you like. if i'm going on a hike in xyz county, i'll download 1000 or so to see if any are nearby where i'm going. caching is a sidetrack, never the main goal. you can even set filters for the type you like. this kind of convenience and speed of operation is really nice about smartphones.

Edited by ohgood
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Hi All,

 

I've been geocaching for a couple of years and use both a garmin gps tracker and my android phone for caching. However, I use the GPS less because I have to pre-load the caches I'm aiming for, meaning I have to chose them in advance. When I'm out and about, I rarely stick to a plan and often end up wandering off track, whether urban or rural. Not really a problem in towns and cities but on the moors or in the woods, I may not have the cache pre-loaded on my GPS, and can't get signal on my phone.

 

So, here is my question: how do I boost the gps/wifi signal in my phone so I can be a spontaneous cacher, rather than having to stick to a pre-laid plan? Is there even a way yet?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Kate

 

you don't need pocket queries. that is for offline devices. what you need is an application that can store waypoints , tracks, routes, and caches, in a logical way. i have about 14,000 caches saved in locus (Android app) database, 5-6000 waypoints, and i think 7000 miles of routes/tracks.

 

before i leave to go hiking, I'll download 4-500 caches for that area... if the plans change, I'll download more on the way. i never download while in the woods, that's when it's time for playing.

 

...but you asked about boosting GPS and wifi.

 

gps: I've never found a place that didn't have good triangulation, besides tunnels and caves. if your device has poor triangulation, you can buy a "bad elf" for about the same price as updating to a better phone.

 

for wifi.... well there isn't much wifi in the woods. i would suggest using cellular for on the fly downloads, and using a sim card with the best coverage for where you plan to live. unlocked phones are extremely flexible now a days, and allow for lots of carriers service.

 

normally I'll use "airplane mode" while in the woods, so i won't be interrupted and the battery will last all day long.

 

To me, this boils down to how one prepares for some geocaching where access to GPS satellites, a cellular connection, or wifi is an unknown.

If one only has a GPS, there is no expectation that cache data can be downloaded while in the field. All cache and map data must be preloaded. When using a GPS, as long as a clear view of a large portion of the sky, you're going to be able to navigate to any caches that have been pre-loaded. Heavy tree cover or being in the middle of a city with tall buildings can reduce accuracy but that is something that you can see or easily predict by looking at a map.

With a smart phone, there is an expectation that you be able to get cache data (and map data) in real time. Although many cellular providers have coverage maps they're primarily for marketing purposes and it may be difficult to predict whether or not one will be able to get cache data for a specific cache. You can't tell by looking at the sky whether or not you'll have a cell signal and be able to get on the fly cache downloads. When gets in the habit of not pre-downloading cache data to a phone before going out there is a risk that your going to get to an area where there isn't cellular access. Ohgood mitigates that risk by pre-downloading data, just as one with a GPS would be required to do. That also allows using the phone in airplane mode to save some battery life.

An unlocked phone might allow one to use sim cards for a different network, but not all sim cards are going to provide data service (and when they do it may be very limited). For someone traveling to another country that means some additional preparation and cost may be required. I've never bothered to purchase/rent a sim card when traveling and will just make sure that my GPS has been pre-loaded with cache and map data for a broad area where I am going to be. I can't imagine ever needing to have 14K caches pre-loaded and typically creating a few PQs so that the total # of cache is under 1000 is more than I would ever need.

 

dang, that's thorough ! thanks !

 

particularly the cellular service part... i guess i didn't state it clearly enough. i'm not advocating swapping sims mid-hike, nope that would probably bite me the first time i did it. more than likely the sim / battery or phone would fall a hundred feet into oblivion, while i was trying to swap them. i'm saying it's a good idea to have a reliable carriers sim for whatever region you're in. taking "lower alabama cellular, inc" sims to canada would probably be a bad idea. :) thats all :)

 

if i were traveling to another country, i would definitely buy a sim card that would work there... for google translate, and all those other wonderful things that cellular data can do.

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How do you have a 14k cache database downloaded if you don't use PQs?

 

An app API app can download cache details directly and store them offline, doesn't need a PQ.

 

Well sure, but the comment in the reply was "you don't need pocket queries. that is for offline devices" so I'm wondering what was meant as the original poster has an offline device - their handheld GPS.

 

the original post was centered around smartphone caching, because of the spontinaity of when/where they cached (or that's how I read it). if they're looking for ways to improve gathering caches on the fly... that smartphone is how. the handheld can't do it, but the smartphone can. the choice is always there to download with the smartphone and share it with the standalone... more than likely with a sdcard swap or usb cable. it's a whole lot easier to just use the device that has them on it, but people like to use the standalones so cables and swapping has to happen i guess. :)

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if i were traveling to another country, i would definitely buy a sim card that would work there... for google translate, and all those other wonderful things that cellular data can do.

 

That understandable, but for me I've never felt it was worth the cost of the purchase or rental of a sim card when I'm traveling. Even in the most unconnected countries I've managed to find a wifi spot and use skype to call home and for geocaching I can just just download cache and map data onto a separate mini-sd card for my handheld GPS and have more cache data than I would ever need. Maybe if I were traveling to another country for 2-3 weeks I might reconsider but for a 4-7 day trip it's just not worth the extra cost.

 

 

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you don't need pocket queries. that is for offline devices.

Pocket Queries are not "for offline device". They are for setting up saved searches, based on different criteria/geographies/attributes/etc. Those PQ's can then be set to run ad-hoc or to automatically refresh on specific days of the week. Some smartphone apps utilize such PQ's, allowing cachers to save PQ results offline.

 

set the center of the map you desire to have caches for, and tell it to download 1, 10, 100, or 500 or whatever you like. if i'm going on a hike in xyz county, i'll download 1000 or so to see if any are nearby where i'm going. caching is a sidetrack, never the main goal. you can even set filters for the type you like. this kind of convenience and speed of operation is really nice about smartphones.

Yes - the method you mentioned allows a user to set filters, but the filtering options depend on the caching app that's being used. Some apps cannot filter on the various things that are available via PQ's. Most apps can filter on cache types, sizes, D/T ratings, found/unfound. Not all apps can filter on recently found, recently updated, basic only, PMO only, unfound, has trackables, or attributes - and some apps will filter on one cache type/size at a time, instead of allowing a user to multi-select.

 

As with many things, the value of PQ's is a "it's depends" situation. It depends on the functionality of the app.

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you don't need pocket queries. that is for offline devices.

Pocket Queries are not "for offline device". They are for setting up saved searches, based on different criteria/geographies/attributes/etc. Those PQ's can then be set to run ad-hoc or to automatically refresh on specific days of the week. Some smartphone apps utilize such PQ's, allowing cachers to save PQ results offline.

 

121 caches to import....

app- does not need pq

standalone- time to plunk in a new pq on the desktop keyboard, find the USB cable that works, check email, and wait a few minutes for it all to happen.

 

i know a few of the newest devices now have wifi, and that's awesome, if we were talking about 2006. those aren't offline devices though, which do need pq in order to get more than a handful at a time.

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Yes - the method you mentioned allows a user to set filters, but the filtering options depend on the caching app that's being used. Some apps cannot filter on the various things that are available via PQ's. Most apps can filter on cache types, sizes, D/T ratings, found/unfound. Not all apps can filter on recently found, recently updated, basic only, PMO only, unfound, has trackables, or attributes - and some apps will filter on one cache type/size at a time, instead of allowing a user to multi-select.

 

As with many things, the value of PQ's is a "it's depends" situation. It depends on the functionality of the app.

 

the app doesn't need pq to import a hundred caches for a location :-)

 

the offline standalone... does. :-)

 

i guess filtering must really well implemented in the apps i use: its just another process i use without thinking much about it. now that you mentioned it, ill try and find things that are hard to do with the app filtering function. hopefully I'll find a glaring bug!

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i guess filtering must really well implemented in the apps i use: its just another process i use without thinking much about it. now that you mentioned it, ill try and find things that are hard to do with the app filtering function. hopefully I'll find a glaring bug!

 

Here are things I might filter for that the phone apps I have on my phone don't yet support...

1) Caches with a hidden date that I need - 28 dates remaining for me

2) Caches with specific attributes

3) Caches which don't have 2+ DNFs in the last 5 logs

4) Caches which haven't been found in > 12 months

Just random "real" examples of filtering. If you can do all these, what geocaching app are you using where the Live API feature supports these?

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i guess filtering must really well implemented in the apps i use: its just another process i use without thinking much about it. now that you mentioned it, ill try and find things that are hard to do with the app filtering function. hopefully I'll find a glaring bug!

 

Here are things I might filter for that the phone apps I have on my phone don't yet support...

 

1) Caches with a hidden date that I need - 28 dates remaining for me

2) Caches with specific attributes

3) Caches which don't have 2+ DNFs in the last 5 logs

4) Caches which haven't been found in > 12 months

 

Just random "real" examples of filtering. If you can do all these, what geocaching app are you using where the Live API feature supports these?

 

Those first would typically used to get a list of caches to complete a challenge. For that kind of bookkeeping I would think using the web site and some sort of waypoint manager (GSAK, Basecamp, ExpertGPS, etc) would be far more effective. I'm not seeing a service description for the API which which would apply those specific filters so an app would have to do some sort of post-processing (get a large number of caches, apply a filter to the results) in the app.

That said, the ability to search for caches with specific attributes isn't available on the standard search (formerly the new search) either and can only be done with PQs.

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NYPC - for clarity, my last post was about OhGood's comments in the thread that you don't need pocket queries and PQs are for offline devices In the basic setup the original poster has. I'm interested in how the searches/filtering in my prior post can be done in a geocaching phone app supported by the Live API.

 

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NYPC - for clarity, my last post was about OhGood's comments in the thread that you don't need pocket queries and PQs are for offline devices In the basic setup the original poster has. I'm interested in how the searches/filtering in my prior post can be done in a geocaching phone app supported by the Live API.

 

after i realized the restrictions dealing with terain and difficulty, i stopped using the API resources and filter after a few hundred are downloaded. i guess that's what you're saying about live API filtering? I'm easy behind the times on what is possible with the live API.

 

 

maybe you may know of a subscriber functionality that will download Lots of caches for subscribers, without using the pq function?

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NYPC - for clarity, my last post was about OhGood's comments in the thread that you don't need pocket queries and PQs are for offline devices In the basic setup the original poster has. I'm interested in how the searches/filtering in my prior post can be done in a geocaching phone app supported by the Live API.

 

after i realized the restrictions dealing with terain and difficulty, i stopped using the API resources and filter after a few hundred are downloaded. i guess that's what you're saying about live API filtering? I'm easy behind the times on what is possible with the live API.

 

 

maybe you may know of a subscriber functionality that will download Lots of caches for subscribers, without using the pq function?

 

A bit all over the place in the discussion. If you go back to your earliest post in the thread you mentioned PQs aren't needed. I'm wondering if the person who has a GPS and a smartphone as the original poster mentioned, how your response is appropriate? They mentioned relying less on the GPS, which they feel is more accurate (different discussion) because they need to preload. They should be able to efficiently pre-load a large amount and update that large amount as frequently as they want. Yes it's offline and likely requires connecting to a computer, but saying they aren't needed needs an alternative solution that wasn't provided in your response. I'm looking for that solution that hopefully doesn't rely on multiple 3rd party apps and exchanging data between the apps.

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NYPC - for clarity, my last post was about OhGood's comments in the thread that you don't need pocket queries and PQs are for offline devices In the basic setup the original poster has. I'm interested in how the searches/filtering in my prior post can be done in a geocaching phone app supported by the Live API.

 

after i realized the restrictions dealing with terain and difficulty, i stopped using the API resources and filter after a few hundred are downloaded. i guess that's what you're saying about live API filtering? I'm easy behind the times on what is possible with the live API.

 

 

maybe you may know of a subscriber functionality that will download Lots of caches for subscribers, without using the pq function?

 

A bit all over the place in the discussion. If you go back to your earliest post in the thread you mentioned PQs aren't needed. I'm wondering if the person who has a GPS and a smartphone as the original poster mentioned, how your response is appropriate? They mentioned relying less on the GPS, which they feel is more accurate (different discussion) because they need to preload. They should be able to efficiently pre-load a large amount and update that large amount as frequently as they want. Yes it's offline and likely requires connecting to a computer, but saying they aren't needed needs an alternative solution that wasn't provided in your response. I'm looking for that solution that hopefully doesn't rely on multiple 3rd party apps and exchanging data between the apps.

 

could you answer my questions above first , so the conversation will be a little easier to follow?

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could you answer my questions above first , so the conversation will be a little easier to follow?

 

The 5th post in the thread is yours and you stated you don't need PQs. My question is how do you accomplish what the original poster asked for? Now you need answers to new questions you just asked in post #21 to justify what you stated in post #5? How about you answer the question asked before yours?

 

I use an iPhone & standalone GPS, PQs, GSAK & Project-GC, all paid offerings, to provide various aspects of information. Other then PQs, the original poster and what you responded to mention no 3rd party products except her GPS. How do you justify the statement that PQs aren't needed for the original poster?

 

 

Edited by Team DEMP
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I can't imagine ever needing to have 14K caches pre-loaded and typically creating a few PQs so that the total # of cache is under 1000 is more than I would ever need.

 

To your point, I traveled to Spain last year not knowing service availability. To solve the problem, I had darn near the entire country pre-loaded into my GPS.. some 12,000+ geocaches. Worked pretty darn slick. I was ready no matter where I landed.

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could you answer my questions above first , so the conversation will be a little easier to follow?

 

The 5th post in the thread is yours and you stated you don't need PQs.

 

1- My question is how do you accomplish what the original poster asked for?

2- Now you need answers to new questions you just asked in post #21

3- to justify what you stated in post #5?

4- How about you answer the question asked before yours?

 

I use an iPhone & standalone GPS, PQs, GSAK & Project-GC, all paid offerings, to provide various aspects of information. Other then PQs, the original poster and what you responded to mention no 3rd party products except her GPS.

5- How do you justify the statement that PQs aren't needed for the original poster?

 

 

doing my best at this point...

1- i download caches, on the smartphone, hence, pq's are never needed.

2- it would be nice.

3- this one just confused me.

4- even more confused. i would be happy to, but at this point i have no idea what you're refering to.

5- having a smartphone means pq isn't needed.

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I can't imagine ever needing to have 14K caches pre-loaded and typically creating a few PQs so that the total # of cache is under 1000 is more than I would ever need.

 

To your point, I traveled to Spain last year not knowing service availability. To solve the problem, I had darn near the entire country pre-loaded into my GPS.. some 12,000+ geocaches. Worked pretty darn slick. I was ready no matter where I landed.

 

cool, someone sees the benefit of larger offline databases. thanks for a good explanation. :)

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Stripping out your confusion...

 

doing my best at this point...

1- i download caches, on the smartphone, hence, pq's are never needed.

 

So because you only use a smartphone, PQs aren't needed for you. The original poster and the followup replies you quoted were regarding a discussion on her standalone GPS.

 

5- having a smartphone means pq isn't needed.

 

So how do you accomplish the following on your smartphone and what app provides these features of filtering on your live API download like I previously asked?

 

1) Caches with a hidden date that I need - 28 dates remaining for me

2) Caches with specific attributes

3) Caches which don't have 2+ DNFs in the last 5 logs

4) Caches which haven't been found in > 12 months

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1) so because you only use a smartphone, PQs aren't needed for you. 2) the original poster and the followup replies you quoted were regarding a discussion on her standalone GPS.

 

3) so how do you accomplish the following on your smartphone and what app provides these features of filtering on your live API download like I previously asked?

 

4) Caches with a hidden date that I need - 28 dates remaining for me

5) Caches with specific attributes

6) Caches which don't have 2+ DNFs in the last 5 logs

7) Caches which haven't been found in > 12 months

 

1- correct

 

2- incorrect. I've been preaching about smartphone abilities, and the lack of needing to filter caches before downloading them. unless i missed the OP asking a second question that was standalone centric.

 

3- again ,i am not using filtering on live API features. no filtering at all, i am only filtering after they are downloaded, while offline. oops, i edited the post to score which apps i use: normally i use locus, and occasionally that one that gs is afraid might take over the world, or gcdroid, or maverick. that's about it. locus does so much more than stand alone stuff does, and so much better, that it's my go to.

 

...this is where your points will prove that you need more filters than i do...

 

4- I'm not sure what "28 dates remaining for me" means. could you explain that portion?

 

5- there is a filter for attributes, i would use that. it looks like all of them are listed.

 

6- i would have to scroll through them, and watch for dnfs. generally I'll do that before dumping the caches into a database entry called "today" si that we don't waste effort on dead caches. there are lots of them.

 

7- hmm i would sort them by date, after filtering for last found.

 

could you answer my questions next ?

Edited by ohgood
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NYPC - for clarity, my last post was about OhGood's comments in the thread that you don't need pocket queries and PQs are for offline devices In the basic setup the original poster has. I'm interested in how the searches/filtering in my prior post can be done in a geocaching phone app supported by the Live API.

 

after i realized the restrictions dealing with terain and difficulty, i stopped using the API resources and filter after a few hundred are downloaded. i guess that's what you're saying about live API filtering? I'm easy behind the times on what is possible with the live API.

 

 

maybe you may know of a subscriber functionality that will download Lots of caches for subscribers, without using the pq function?

 

The way I saw it was that filtering can be done two ways. Use the API to get a large number of caches lists based on proximity of a center point then filter those results based on various criteria before presenting a list of caches to the user. The other way would be to include criteria when calling an API service which result in a smaller number of caches sent to the client. In the first case, the filtering is done on the client (app) side and in the second the filter is done on the server (API) side.

 

At the end of the day, does it really matter if the filter is done client or server side. The advantage of filtering on the client side is that once the data is downloaded one can use different filters on the same data without having to download new data.

Edited by NYPaddleCacher
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PQs and the API are two different methods of downloading caches. Both methods can be used for either standalone GPSrs or smartphones, and neither method is intended for only standalone GPSrs or smartphones. The method you use depends on many different factors, only one of which is the type of device you'll be loading the end result onto.

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I can't imagine ever needing to have 14K caches pre-loaded and typically creating a few PQs so that the total # of cache is under 1000 is more than I would ever need.

 

To your point, I traveled to Spain last year not knowing service availability. To solve the problem, I had darn near the entire country pre-loaded into my GPS.. some 12,000+ geocaches. Worked pretty darn slick. I was ready no matter where I landed.

 

cool, someone sees the benefit of larger offline databases. thanks for a good explanation. :)

 

Sorry for the stalking but I see that 58 caches out those 12,000 caches were found. Sure, it's nice to have a large offline database but I'm not sure I agree that it has a significant practical purpose

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The original poster has a traditional GPS. They referenced an apparent inability to have enough caches on their GPS asked about improving GPS reception when using their phone. A very logical suggestion is to optimize their experience using the existing device and not acquire additional HW (whether anyone would agree it was needed or not). Hence the multiple suggestions for pocket queries for use with the traditional GPS which you replied pocket queries aren't needed.

 

As for device based filtering, the official application is rather limited and the API also limited hence the questions on how you accomplish some rather common tasks that most would leverage PQs.

 

The "28 dates remaining" for Finds By Hidden Date is about finding a cache placed on each calendar day of the year. I need 28 more dates to complete the grid. You can see yours at http://project-gc.com/ProfileStats/ohgood or any FindStats like analysis.

 

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At the end of the day, does it really matter if the filter is done client or server side. The advantage of filtering on the client side is that once the data is downloaded one can use different filters on the same data without having to download new data.

 

What is optimal would be based on what you are searching for. If I want to find caches placed in 2000 that I haven't found in NJ, NY, CT or MA it would be a heck of a better option for the server to return the 12 caches vs download 10s/100s of thousands of caches to then filter out the 12. If I'm driving a 600 mile route and want to find caches within 1 mile of the highway with Favorite Points > 20, server filtering is probably optimal.

 

If you are in an area for an extended period and will be running many queries against the same data, then client-side filtering could be more effective. Client-side filtering also requires your client database needs to constantly be updated while server-side is always hitting the most up-to-date data.

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you don't need pocket queries. that is for offline devices.

Pocket Queries are not "for offline device". They are for setting up saved searches, based on different criteria/geographies/attributes/etc. Those PQ's can then be set to run ad-hoc or to automatically refresh on specific days of the week. Some smartphone apps utilize such PQ's, allowing cachers to save PQ results offline.

121 caches to import....

app- does not need pq

standalone- time to plunk in a new pq on the desktop keyboard, find the USB cable that works, check email, and wait a few minutes for it all to happen.

 

i know a few of the newest devices now have wifi, and that's awesome, if we were talking about 2006. those aren't offline devices though, which do need pq in order to get more than a handful at a time.

I think you missed my point. You said that pocket queries are for offline devices. My point was that PQ's can also be useful for cachers using apps and are not only for offline devices. Some apps allow cachers to download the PQ's for use while offline, such as when they don't have cell/wifi service.

 

Perhaps if you could use PQ's, then you would see their value when a cacher wants to only see some caches on their screen. Some cachers want to determine which caches seem appealing and have only those caches show up on their map, which can help with planning a route. Rather than having all caches appear and then have to click on each one individually, while in the field, to determine whether to attempt or skip. Cache bookmark lists help with this, which can then be downloaded offline to a GPSr or smartphone.

 

Yes - the method you mentioned allows a user to set filters, but the filtering options depend on the caching app that's being used. Some apps cannot filter on the various things that are available via PQ's. Most apps can filter on cache types, sizes, D/T ratings, found/unfound. Not all apps can filter on recently found, recently updated, basic only, PMO only, unfound, has trackables, or attributes - and some apps will filter on one cache type/size at a time, instead of allowing a user to multi-select.

 

As with many things, the value of PQ's is a "it's depends" situation. It depends on the functionality of the app.

 

the app doesn't need pq to import a hundred caches for a location :-)

 

the offline standalone... does. :-)

I think, in your haste to promote smartphones over GPSr's, you missed my point.

 

doing my best at this point...

1- i download caches, on the smartphone, hence, pq's are never needed.

[snip]

5- having a smartphone means pq isn't needed.

Again, my comments were not about whether PQ's are "needed" to download caches, but that PQ's are not meant for only offline devices.

 

PQs and the API are two different methods of downloading caches. Both methods can be used for either standalone GPSrs or smartphones, and neither method is intended for only standalone GPSrs or smartphones. The method you use depends on many different factors, only one of which is the type of device you'll be loading the end result onto.

bolding mine

Yes - this was my point, but you said it much more succinctly.

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To your point, I traveled to Spain last year not knowing service availability. To solve the problem, I had darn near the entire country pre-loaded into my GPS.. some 12,000+ geocaches. Worked pretty darn slick. I was ready no matter where I landed.

Sorry for the stalking but I see that 58 caches out those 12,000 caches were found. Sure, it's nice to have a large offline database but I'm not sure I agree that it has a significant practical purpose

I don't see how the find count matters. If bflentje only downloaded 2000 geocaches for his trip and ended up going to an area that wasn't covered in his download, then he wouldn't have been able to look for any caches.

 

I've done similar to what blentje described, although only 5k instead of 12k.

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To your point, I traveled to Spain last year not knowing service availability. To solve the problem, I had darn near the entire country pre-loaded into my GPS.. some 12,000+ geocaches. Worked pretty darn slick. I was ready no matter where I landed.

Sorry for the stalking but I see that 58 caches out those 12,000 caches were found. Sure, it's nice to have a large offline database but I'm not sure I agree that it has a significant practical purpose

I don't see how the find count matters. If bflentje only downloaded 2000 geocaches for his trip and ended up going to an area that wasn't covered in his download, then he wouldn't have been able to look for any caches.

 

I've done similar to what blentje described, although only 5k instead of 12k.

 

I agree, and I've done the same. When I go to Maine on vacation, I know I'll be going out with my Brother-in-Law caching a few times, and that we might go anywhere. And I don't have internet access while I am there. So in advance I'll load at least all of Maine (was around 8,000 caches from memory). Last year also loaded New Hampshire as well. Number of finds has nothing to do with it, it is the ability to be prepared wherever we go.

 

At home I know some people who download all caches in the UK - that's about 200,000 caches. I don't do that. I always have the 6000 unfound closest to home loaded (which for me is a radius of just under 30 miles). When I am going somewhere else in the country, I load caches in that area before I go.

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I can't imagine ever needing to have 14K caches pre-loaded and typically creating a few PQs so that the total # of cache is under 1000 is more than I would ever need.

 

To your point, I traveled to Spain last year not knowing service availability. To solve the problem, I had darn near the entire country pre-loaded into my GPS.. some 12,000+ geocaches. Worked pretty darn slick. I was ready no matter where I landed.

 

cool, someone sees the benefit of larger offline databases. thanks for a good explanation. :)

 

Sorry for the stalking but I see that 58 caches out those 12,000 caches were found. Sure, it's nice to have a large offline database but I'm not sure I agree that it has a significant practical purpose

 

Not practical because I found 58 out of 12,000? Jeepers man, some of you people really need to get new hobbies.

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The original poster has a traditional GPS. They referenced an apparent inability to have enough caches on their GPS asked about improving GPS reception when using their phone. A very logical suggestion is to optimize their experience using the existing device and not acquire additional HW (whether anyone would agree it was needed or not). Hence the multiple suggestions for pocket queries for use with the traditional GPS which you replied pocket queries aren't needed.

 

As for device based filtering, the official application is rather limited and the API also limited hence the questions on how you accomplish some rather common tasks that most would leverage PQs.

 

The "28 dates remaining" for Finds By Hidden Date is about finding a cache placed on each calendar day of the year. I need 28 more dates to complete the grid. You can see yours at http://project-gc.com/ProfileStats/ohgood or any FindStats like analysis.

 

 

well, the fact that someone cares enough about statistics of caches to make a spreadsheet is alarming by itself. but people actually try to fill in those boxes? dang. that's weird.

 

personal realizations aside, no, i have no idea how to find out 28 dates of something, and fully intend to never find out how. if that's your thing, good luck, i will definitely never be competing with you on that field. :-)

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The original poster has a traditional GPS. They referenced an apparent inability to have enough caches on their GPS asked about improving GPS reception when using their phone. A very logical suggestion is to optimize their experience using the existing device and not acquire additional HW (whether anyone would agree it was needed or not). Hence the multiple suggestions for pocket queries for use with the traditional GPS which you replied pocket queries aren't needed.

 

As for device based filtering, the official application is rather limited and the API also limited hence the questions on how you accomplish some rather common tasks that most would leverage PQs.

 

The "28 dates remaining" for Finds By Hidden Date is about finding a cache placed on each calendar day of the year. I need 28 more dates to complete the grid. You can see yours at http://project-gc.co...ileStats/ohgood or any FindStats like analysis.

 

 

well, the fact that someone cares enough about statistics of caches to make a spreadsheet is alarming by itself. but people actually try to fill in those boxes? dang. that's weird.

 

personal realizations aside, no, i have no idea how to find out 28 dates of something, and fully intend to never find out how. if that's your thing, good luck, i will definitely never be competing with you on that field. :-)

 

Maybe

what you've just realized is that everyone doesn't enjoy the hobby the same as you and therefore has varied needs from what you feel is the most appropriate way? Anyway, I'm not looking for anyone to compete with me - it's an individual/family hobby and not a team/competitive one, at least for us. We just set goals that we try to achieve and it's great that our goals can be different from your goals.

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