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christhecrayon

Versatile and comfortable hiking boots (I tend to slip a lot)

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Hi people! :)

 

I started geocaching couple months ago and I love it! My friend dragged me into this.

 

Because of geocaching I've discovered so many unseen places. It's like hiking on steroids!

 

You have to activate all your senses to find that nano thing! Although, I haven't really found it myself.

 

Anyway,

 

I decided to take this a bit more serious and invest some money into my footwear.

 

After one long hike/geocaching with my more experienced friend those old sneakers of mine gave me unbearably painful blisters.

 

I've started researching on the internet and found some useful info on how to choose hiking boots.

 

I even actually went to the local store and tried some.

 

I really liked one pair KEEN Men’s Targhee II Hiking Shoes it's mentioned in this site as a number 1 http://readytohike.com/best-hiking-shoes-for-men-lightweight/ because where I'm from there are four seasons. And this pair looks quite versatile.

 

On the other hand, I am considering Merrell Men’s Moab Ventilator Hiking Shoes as well...

 

I'd like to hear your opinion before actually buying. Which pair seems better to you?

 

Thanks in advance!

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Curious why you use a sock account here, and never logged any of the caches found with your friend yet.

We don't usually associate nanos with hiking. :)

 

Anyway...

 

If I was going to do research on outdoor footwear and apparel, I probably wouldn't go by a "twenty something year old's" kinda blog site, but one of the many actually researching/testing products.

Backpacker.com is one.

We usually tell new folks who really hike to go to REI, Cabela's, and similar, and try on a lot of different pairs/styles.

What I find awesome may feel like the boxes they came in for another. :laughing:

One praised by others here, I couldn't get my feet in, even after a half size larger.

Always nice to buy a pair there, but in the future you'll sorta know what brands fit you for online order.

 

Our first requirement is fit, then it has to have a GoreTex membrane.

We still haven't found "waterproofing/venting" by another equivalent.

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Curious why you use a sock account here, and never logged any of the caches found with your friend yet.

We don't usually associate nanos with hiking. :)

 

Yeah, isn't there a saying about people that hide a nano in the woods? :laughing:

 

Hiking boots, I know a little about. I have Rocky, Bates, and RedHead.

 

Best advice on buying boots I can offer is shop surplus stores and try them on first. :anibad:

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Curious why you use a sock account here, and never logged any of the caches found with your friend yet.

We don't usually associate nanos with hiking. :)

 

Anyway...

 

If I was going to do research on outdoor footwear and apparel, I probably wouldn't go by a "twenty something year old's" kinda blog site, but one of the many actually researching/testing products.

Backpacker.com is one.

We usually tell new folks who really hike to go to REI, Cabela's, and similar, and try on a lot of different pairs/styles.

What I find awesome may feel like the boxes they came in for another. :laughing:

One praised by others here, I couldn't get my feet in, even after a half size larger.

Always nice to buy a pair there, but in the future you'll sorta know what brands fit you for online order.

 

Our first requirement is fit, then it has to have a GoreTex membrane.

We still haven't found "waterproofing/venting" by another equivalent.

 

Hi! Thanks for the input! I just checked REI website.

 

I noticed something interesting. Vegan boots?? What do you know about them? https://www.rei.com/c/mens-boots?r=category%3Afootwear%7Cmens-footwear%7Cmens-boots%3Bfeatures%3AVegan&ir=category%3Amens-boots

 

And sorry if you got confused about my account. But this is the only account I use :)

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I believe "vegan" simply means no leather, and some glues aren't used.

Maybe looked for by those who won't wear a leather belt, preferring nylon (synthetics), or other natural materials (like hemp).

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I believe "vegan" simply means no leather, and some glues aren't used.

Maybe looked for by those who won't wear a leather belt, preferring nylon (synthetics), or other natural materials (like hemp).

 

But I've noticed that only a few are specified as vegan. What's the difference between purely synthetic and vegan? Both of these are without leather... :lostsignal:

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I believe "vegan" simply means no leather, and some glues aren't used.

Maybe looked for by those who won't wear a leather belt, preferring nylon (synthetics), or other natural materials (like hemp).

 

But I've noticed that only a few are specified as vegan. What's the difference between purely synthetic and vegan? Both of these are without leather... :lostsignal:

Doesn't look like an official government sanctioned certification, like organic, so your mileage may vary. Looks like there's two or three organizations that will allow companies to use their official logo after some vetting.

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I have bad feet (club toes), so proper boot selection is super important to me.

 

As stated above, go to a real outdoors store like REI or LL Bean and not a regular sporting goods store. Sales staff at an outdoors store tend to be knowledgeable and helpful. For me, it's worth a little extra money to get the benefit of their advice.

 

If you tend to slip and stumble a lot, I have two suggestions. First, select a tread pattern with wider space between the lugs. This will give you slightly better grip when walking on slick rocks, muddy trails, etc. Second, consider buying hiking boots that extend above the ankle, to provide extra support. I have three pairs of hiking boots: low-cut trail shoes, regular hiking boots and heavy duty backpacking boots.

 

You cannot go wrong with Merrells for your first pair of hiking boots, IF you find a model that feels comfortable for you. I've also had good success with Columbia trail shoes and hiking boots.

 

Here is an article on REI's website that gives a good introduction to the types of shoes and how to go about selecting the right pair for you. If you Google, you'll find many other articles on outdoor websites and blogs. Good luck!

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I have bad feet (club toes), so proper boot selection is super important to me.

 

As stated above, go to a real outdoors store like REI or LL Bean and not a regular sporting goods store. Sales staff at an outdoors store tend to be knowledgeable and helpful. For me, it's worth a little extra money to get the benefit of their advice.

 

If you tend to slip and stumble a lot, I have two suggestions. First, select a tread pattern with wider space between the lugs. This will give you slightly better grip when walking on slick rocks, muddy trails, etc. Second, consider buying hiking boots that extend above the ankle, to provide extra support. I have three pairs of hiking boots: low-cut trail shoes, regular hiking boots and heavy duty backpacking boots.

 

You cannot go wrong with Merrells for your first pair of hiking boots, IF you find a model that feels comfortable for you. I've also had good success with Columbia trail shoes and hiking boots.

 

Here is an article on REI's website that gives a good introduction to the types of shoes and how to go about selecting the right pair for you. If you Google, you'll find many other articles on outdoor websites and blogs. Good luck!

 

Thank you for the opinion, I appreciate it :)

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I believe "vegan" simply means no leather, and some glues aren't used.

Maybe looked for by those who won't wear a leather belt, preferring nylon (synthetics), or other natural materials (like hemp).

 

But I've noticed that only a few are specified as vegan. What's the difference between purely synthetic and vegan? Both of these are without leather... :lostsignal:

Doesn't look like an official government sanctioned certification, like organic, so your mileage may vary. Looks like there's two or three organizations that will allow companies to use their official logo after some vetting.

 

That's interesting, I am going to look into that.

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Since your concern is slipping and sliding, I would suggest looking at a show with Vibram soles. This is a special rubber formulated for more traction. Merrill's make good shoes with Vibram, but so do a lot of others. Buy shoes that fit ..Because if the don't, you will be miserable.

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Since your concern is slipping and sliding, I would suggest looking at a show with Vibram soles. This is a special rubber formulated for more traction. Merrill's make good shoes with Vibram, but so do a lot of others. Buy shoes that fit ..Because if the don't, you will be miserable.

 

Thank you :) I think I know what I'm going to buy now!

 

Although, I am really curious about the last pair mentioned. I'd like to try how it feels wearing shoes with toes :D

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I think you're confusing Vibram the company, that makes lug soles for a variety of shoe manufacturers, and Vibram Fivefinger shoes, which are two different things.

 

Although interesting to try out, I don't think the Fivefingers would be an appropriate choice for the type of activity you're talking about. Most of the people that I know that use them on a routine basis, had to kind of train their feet to withstand the amount of stress that the minimalist design requires. There is pretty much zero support, and zero padding in those things. It really changes the way you walk and hike, so it takes a bit of time to work your way up to that sort of thing.

 

There is an argument for the five toe design, in reducing blisters between and on top of the toes, and the Ininja brand of socks is one way of taking advantage of that. I use a very thin Ininja sock as my inner sock, and Wright Socks as my outer, for most of my longer hikes and runs.

 

Vibram lug soles have been around forever it seems, and are certainly the standard out there. Most of their advantage comes from the lug design. The rubber itself, is fairly hard, and will last forever it seems. I usually wear out the uppers before the soles need replacing.

 

La Sportiva is another shoe/boot company to consider. They started out as a rock climbing shoe company, but have expanded their line to hiking and running. The soles of their shoes are a proprietary rubber formulation that is much stickier than Vibram. The softer rubber will wear out sooner than a comparable Vibram design, but for traction, they're hard to beat. The one disadvantage is that most of their shoes don't come with much ankle support, so if that is critical in your decision making process, you may have to look at another manufacturer.

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I think you're confusing Vibram the company, that makes lug soles for a variety of shoe manufacturers, and Vibram Fivefinger shoes, which are two different things.

 

Although interesting to try out, I don't think the Fivefingers would be an appropriate choice for the type of activity you're talking about. Most of the people that I know that use them on a routine basis, had to kind of train their feet to withstand the amount of stress that the minimalist design requires. There is pretty much zero support, and zero padding in those things. It really changes the way you walk and hike, so it takes a bit of time to work your way up to that sort of thing.

 

There is an argument for the five toe design, in reducing blisters between and on top of the toes, and the Ininja brand of socks is one way of taking advantage of that. I use a very thin Ininja sock as my inner sock, and Wright Socks as my outer, for most of my longer hikes and runs.

 

Vibram lug soles have been around forever it seems, and are certainly the standard out there. Most of their advantage comes from the lug design. The rubber itself, is fairly hard, and will last forever it seems. I usually wear out the uppers before the soles need replacing.

 

La Sportiva is another shoe/boot company to consider. They started out as a rock climbing shoe company, but have expanded their line to hiking and running. The soles of their shoes are a proprietary rubber formulation that is much stickier than Vibram. The softer rubber will wear out sooner than a comparable Vibram design, but for traction, they're hard to beat. The one disadvantage is that most of their shoes don't come with much ankle support, so if that is critical in your decision making process, you may have to look at another manufacturer.

 

I love my Fivefingers and wear them nearly all the time in summer. Very light, great grip, and you are training some muscles that you maybe didn't even know of before.

For multi-day hikes or when carrying a heavy backpack I use La Sportiva trekking boots. I just checked, they also have a Vibram sole.

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The key with hiking shoes os to find a pair that are comfortable for your particular foot. If you have a store near you go there and try on a few different pair. Remember to try them on with socks that your are likely to be wearing.

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I really liked one pair KEEN Men’s Targhee II Hiking Shoes it's mentioned in this site as a number 1 http://readytohike.c...en-lightweight/ because where I'm from there are four seasons. And this pair looks quite versatile.

 

On the other hand, I am considering Merrell Men’s Moab Ventilator Hiking Shoes as well...

 

I'd like to hear your opinion before actually buying. Which pair seems better to you?

 

It doesn't matter which seems better to me because I won't be wearing them, you will. The best hiking boot is the one that fits YOU properly. A boot I love may be living hell on your feet. Both of those boots may be fine for you or perhaps neither is. You have to try them on and walk around in them for a while. Go to a good outdoors store, one that has inclined platform to get a feel of walking up and down hill in the boot. Sometimes boots that feel great on flat terrain may hurt walking uphill or downhill.

 

The key is fit and what feels good on YOUR feet. Reading reviews about boots can provide some information about the quality and durability of of the boot, but not the fit. Fit is a very individual thing.

 

If you have an REI or LL Bean nearby they usually have trained hiking boot fitters and they also have a satisfaction guarantee. If it turns out the boots are giving you a problem, just send them back.

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I wear Merrell Ventilators Usually but any type of Merrell hiking shoe/boot should work great may be a little high on price for some of the models but well worth it. But whatever your taste in boots is go for it.

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Have you looked at HOKA One One Boots? They may cost a bit but are super comfortable. Great trail Boot.

 

I will admit I have too many boots but the Hoka seems ok in my book. I've used them in the snow but never would use Crampons on them.

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I really liked one pair KEEN Men’s Targhee II Hiking Shoes it's mentioned in this site as a number 1 http://readytohike.c...en-lightweight/ because where I'm from there are four seasons. And this pair looks quite versatile.

 

On the other hand, I am considering Merrell Men’s Moab Ventilator Hiking Shoes as well...

 

I'd like to hear your opinion before actually buying. Which pair seems better to you?

 

It doesn't matter which seems better to me because I won't be wearing them, you will. The best hiking boot is the one that fits YOU properly. A boot I love may be living hell on your feet. Both of those boots may be fine for you or perhaps neither is. You have to try them on and walk around in them for a while. Go to a good outdoors store, one that has inclined platform to get a feel of walking up and down hill in the boot. Sometimes boots that feel great on flat terrain may hurt walking uphill or downhill.

 

The key is fit and what feels good on YOUR feet. Reading reviews about boots can provide some information about the quality and durability of of the boot, but not the fit. Fit is a very individual thing.

 

If you have an REI or LL Bean nearby they usually have trained hiking boot fitters and they also have a satisfaction guarantee. If it turns out the boots are giving you a problem, just send them back.

This advise is spot on. Everyone can recommend a good quality brand, but the fit is going to depend on you and the boot you try. I'm very picky and once I land on a brand style, I tend to stick with it until my next fitting feels like something changed, then its weeks of trying everything until I find the perfect fit once again. Your best test is going to be at stores that provide a test path you can try the boots on. Some REI stores will provide a simulated typical rocky trail with angles to test slippage in the footwear.

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Curious why you use a sock account here, and never logged any of the caches found with your friend yet.

We don't usually associate nanos with hiking. :)

 

Yeah, isn't there a saying about people that hide a nano in the woods? :laughing:

 

Hiking boots, I know a little about. I have Rocky, Bates, and RedHead.

 

Best advice on buying boots I can offer is shop surplus stores and try them on first. :anibad:

 

I love my Bates boots - and their NQA warranty... That said, some others would likely prefer something different.

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I've several different types of boots Timberland, Merrell and my favorite of all are the Keen just perfect for going into trails and hiking, makes my Geocaching experience more fun too cause I don't have to worry about my feet getting hurt. ^_^

Edited by XEmeralDQueenX

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