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SheepOnTrip

Can it be an earthcache?

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I was at the beach the other day, and was sad to see some trash around. Although some of it wasn't left by travellers, but was brough by the sea. I thought of my trip to the Arctic, where we saw a lot of trash in some remote unaccessable shores, all from other countries, carried by the golf stream. So I thought that although I'm not a big earthcache fan, this could be a nice geography lesson and also a good reminder to the loggers to bring a trash bag and clean up.

 

But as I say - I'm not a big fan or have much knowledge of earthcaches, so I'm not sure wether this could be use as an earthcache topic, or is other geography non pure geology lessons do not apply. What do you think?

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I think that geography and geology are two different things. Without additional details, it's difficult to see how the topic would fit within the confines of the Guidelines.

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I highly recommend that you check out the resources at earthcache.org to get a better understanding of what Earthcaches are.

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Oh, thank God, something to talk about other than the earthcache souvenir.

 

I don't think that flotsam and jetsam on the beach by itself can be a viable earthcache. But if you can use it as part of a larger lesson on how ocean currents and wave action are shaping the coastline there, or forming the beach, or something along those lines, it might work.

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Mmmm... that's a shame. I was trying to focus more on currents and their affect on the beach not in its shape, but on its pollution with garbage, logs and other stuff that are carried by the sea.

As English is not my mother tongue it is a hard job for me to either solve earthcaches (that's part of why I'm not a fan - most of them are very complicated for people who are not speaking English as first language, as it very hard to answer technical geology questions for us, or even anderstand some of the questions) or making a new one. So if you're saying it is probably not comply anyway, I won't bother with the task of reading all the exhausting long texts of guidelines...

thanks for the help (:

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Mmmm... that's a shame. I was trying to focus more on currents and their affect on the beach not in its shape, but on its pollution with garbage, logs and other stuff that are carried by the sea.

As English is not my mother tongue it is a hard job for me to either solve earthcaches (that's part of why I'm not a fan - most of them are very complicated for people who are not speaking English as first language, as it very hard to answer technical geology questions for us, or even anderstand some of the questions) or making a new one. So if you're saying it is probably not comply anyway, I won't bother with the task of reading all the exhausting long texts of guidelines...

thanks for the help (:

I'm not saying that it can't be done. There are plenty of earthcaches based on tides and currents. But I would get with your local earthcache reviewer first to get their thoughts and see if they think it is viable.

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Sounds like a good location to host your next CITO event!

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I was at the beach the other day, and was sad to see some trash around. Although some of it wasn't left by travellers, but was brough by the sea. I thought of my trip to the Arctic, where we saw a lot of trash in some remote unaccessable shores, all from other countries, carried by the golf stream. So I thought that although I'm not a big earthcache fan, this could be a nice geography lesson and also a good reminder to the loggers to bring a trash bag and clean up.

 

But as I say - I'm not a big fan or have much knowledge of earthcaches, so I'm not sure wether this could be use as an earthcache topic, or is other geography non pure geology lessons do not apply. What do you think?

 

Educate people to use less packaging, and waste fewer things everyday. Just transporting garbage from non land fill areas to landfills is ignoring the real issue.

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I was at the beach the other day, and was sad to see some trash around. Although some of it wasn't left by travellers, but was brough by the sea. I thought of my trip to the Arctic, where we saw a lot of trash in some remote unaccessable shores, all from other countries, carried by the golf stream. So I thought that although I'm not a big earthcache fan, this could be a nice geography lesson and also a good reminder to the loggers to bring a trash bag and clean up.

 

But as I say - I'm not a big fan or have much knowledge of earthcaches, so I'm not sure wether this could be use as an earthcache topic, or is other geography non pure geology lessons do not apply. What do you think?

 

Educate people to use less packaging, and waste fewer things everyday. Just transporting garbage from non land fill areas to landfills is ignoring the real issue.

 

No argue here. I do that in my own life. It's always better to prevent the massive waste by using less and reuse. But since there is garabage around in the nature, it always help to have a plastic bag with you.

As I said, when I went to the Arctic I was amazed how much waste get swept there from far away places, to this remote place which only small ships can reach. Most of our group kept on walking. I had bags so I collected while I was walking, and soon other started helping me. We walked for 3 hours and collected a huge pile of trash, including fishing nets which are dangerous to the animals, we got it all onto the boat, and it sailed with us for 8 days till we reached the only town where we handed it all to the autorities to deal with. It's a tiny contribution, but if every boat's passengers will do it, it will make a big impact.

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The ocean and its currents are geology topics. Sand deposition and erosion is actually a fascinating subject. Part of wave deposition unfortunately includes the deposition of garbage along with sand carried by currents. I would think this would make a great Earthcache to teach about ocean geology. But I don't decide what counts as an Earthcache.

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I think this would be very difficult to make into a publishable EarthCache.

See the list of acceptable/unacceptable topics: http://support.Groundspeak.com/index.php?pg=kb.page&id=292

Acceptable: Deposition, so you've got deposition of trash here, but that's kind of a stretch.

Non-Acceptable: Oceanographic observations (that would probably rule out a focus on the patterns of ocean currents carrying the trash)

Think about what the logging task would be, and how that might create a geological lesson. If this could be done, it might work. But I think this would be very difficult, creating a logging task that involves on-site observations, about something unique here.

Just my thoughts.

--Matt Dawson, GSA

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I was at the beach the other day, and was sad to see some trash around. Although some of it wasn't left by travellers, but was brough by the sea. I thought of my trip to the Arctic, where we saw a lot of trash in some remote unaccessable shores, all from other countries, carried by the golf stream. So I thought that although I'm not a big earthcache fan, this could be a nice geography lesson and also a good reminder to the loggers to bring a trash bag and clean up.

 

But as I say - I'm not a big fan or have much knowledge of earthcaches, so I'm not sure wether this could be use as an earthcache topic, or is other geography non pure geology lessons do not apply. What do you think?

 

Educate people to use less packaging, and waste fewer things everyday. Just transporting garbage from non land fill areas to landfills is ignoring the real issue.

 

Except not in a cache, because that would be an agenda. :unsure:

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