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MakeTheOne

How to choose a hydration pack?

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Hi, I'm an outdoor lover. Next week I'll go hiking with my buddies. I'm now going to buy one hydration pack.

 

There are so many brands that I wondered which one to buy.

The capacity ranges from 1L~3L. We'll hike for about one day. Should I choose the largest capacity?

And what else should I pay attention to?

 

Anyone who can give me your kind suggestion?

 

Thanks in advance.

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You didn't give much info for strangers to go on... :laughing:

 

All day on a packed trail, I might only take my camera bag, and 32oz in a bottle carrier.

A full day on the AT in July, I might need more than a gallon.

 

If I was gonna buy one pack for hiking, it wouldn't be a "hydration" pack, but a good quality day-pack that's able to accept a few sizes of hydration bladders.

 

Most of the "hydration packs" I've used over the years end up in a loaner box for others.

For me, there never seems to be enough room in most, and the ones that have the room aren't practical weight-wise (structured for durability, not weight savings for backpackers).

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Like cerberus1, I would probably focus on the pack first, and see what capacity/features I need. Most packs out there have hydration sleeves, so it's just a matter of buying the bladder to slip into the back of the pack.

 

For day hikes, I have a Platypus reservoir. I used to use Camelback for quite some time, but the twist top openings were quite a source of annoyance to me. Platypus opens at the top like a zip lock bag, and has a plastic clamp to secure the opening.

 

For backpacking, I have a Katadyne Gravity Works, which has a bladder as part of the system, which I'll use, along with one or two hand carry bottles that are within easy reach.

 

I have a variety of sizes depending on where I'm going and what the conditions are like. On a relatively warm/hot summer day in my area, and I'm out all day, I'll carry two 3 liter bladders. Water sources can be sort of undependable in my area, so I tend to carry what I need so I don't have to be concerned about running out of water.

Edited by Touchstone

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I used to carry a 3 liter hydration bladder. I knocked that down to two liters because of the weight savings. I augment it with a water filter and quick disconnect system so I can connect to it without taking the backpack off or taking the hydration bladder out when the pack is off during rest periods. The water filter is carried in a side pouch attached to the pack belt for easy access. You can do this with any hydration pack you finally decide to do for yourself. Practice at home first and learn how many strokes it takes to fill your pack when you're sucking on a dry tube.

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You didn't give much info for strangers to go on... :laughing:

 

All day on a packed trail, I might only take my camera bag, and 32oz in a bottle carrier.

A full day on the AT in July, I might need more than a gallon.

 

If I was gonna buy one pack for hiking, it wouldn't be a "hydration" pack, but a good quality day-pack that's able to accept a few sizes of hydration bladders.

 

Most of the "hydration packs" I've used over the years end up in a loaner box for others.

For me, there never seems to be enough room in most, and the ones that have the room aren't practical weight-wise (structured for durability, not weight savings for backpackers).

Thanks for your suggestion for a Newbie :laughing: :laughing:

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Like cerberus1, I would probably focus on the pack first, and see what capacity/features I need. Most packs out there have hydration sleeves, so it's just a matter of buying the bladder to slip into the back of the pack.

 

For day hikes, I have a Platypus reservoir. I used to use Camelback for quite some time, but the twist top openings were quite a source of annoyance to me. Platypus opens at the top like a zip lock bag, and has a plastic clamp to secure the opening.

 

For backpacking, I have a Katadyne Gravity Works, which has a bladder as part of the system, which I'll use, along with one or two hand carry bottles that are within easy reach.

 

I have a variety of sizes depending on where I'm going and what the conditions are like. On a relatively warm/hot summer day in my area, and I'm out all day, I'll carry two 3 liter bladders. Water sources can be sort of undependable in my area, so I tend to carry what I need so I don't have to be concerned about running out of water.

It seems that you're an very experienced outdoor lover! Thanks a lot. :D

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I'm a hiker and a backpacker. I have a 1L, 2L and 3L bladder. On day hikes, 95% of the time I use the 3L. I always use the 3L when backpacking. I'm a big water drinker and better safe than sorry. I prefer the Camelbak to the other brands.

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"For day hikes, I have a Platypus reservoir. I used to use Camelback for quite some time, but the twist top openings were quite a source of annoyance to me".

 

The new Camelbak is more challenging to open, I agree.

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Hi, I'm an outdoor lover. Next week I'll go hiking with my buddies. I'm now going to buy one hydration pack.

 

There are so many brands that I wondered which one to buy.

The capacity ranges from 1L~3L. We'll hike for about one day. Should I choose the largest capacity?

And what else should I pay attention to?

 

Anyone who can give me your kind suggestion?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Get a bigger pack and bigger capacity bladder than you think you need. It's very easy to only put one liter in a three liter bladder. It's a lot harder to put three liters on a one liter bladder. ;-)

 

I have two camelbaks that are older than my children, and a very nice 43l backpack that carries a camelbak bladder easily along with a weekend's supplies. The bigger your pack gets, the more you should ask for help during fitting. You do not want a pack that moves around and hurts your skin/shoulders/hip.

 

If you have ever considered a hike n camp, buy a hammock and hang out in the back yard to get used to how and where to set up. Hammocks are some of the lightest possible shelters for s hiking trips.

 

Carry a couple of extra bite valves also. Those always get pulled off and lost in the middle of the hottest hike of your life.

 

If you go ultra light, you'll probably realize the $20 packs at Walmart are just as capable as the $200 brand name stuff... It's just carrying water. As you go bigger, you'll appreciate the better padding in the higher end packs.

 

If you can put your eye drops, repellent, and other often accessed things in closer pockets instead of the main compartment, even better.

 

Have fun, get lost, take pictures.

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