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What is Good about Pokeman Go that could enhance your Geocaching Experience?


RedsSockpuppet
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This game was getting a bit crowded.

 

If all the muggles-with-apps become muggles-with-some-other app, yay.:P

 

THIS!

 

I personally don't want or need more people to flock to Geocaching. It's there for those who want to try it and enjoy it. Most do just that and then move on after a bit. Some develop a sick addiction (like me!) I wouldn't want anything like Pokemon Go influencing Geocaching. (To borrow a line from Seinfeld, "Not that there's anything wrong with it") I tried Pokemon and found it mildly entertaining. It will bore some, be fun for others and an addiction for a few, just like any hobby. C'est la vie tongue.gif

 

I just went for a run which ended in a park. I saw three groups of people of varying ages in the park playing Pokemon Go (I know this because they were talking about it). I don't think cache owners want this level of attention.

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In a matter of days, people using this app have caused all sorts of problems. Arlington National Cemetery has asked people to refrain from doing it on their grounds. Storekeepers are putting signs in store windows telling players to stay away. The police are raising red flags about safety because of people walking into traffic.

 

Geocachers would be well advised to create as much distance from this insipid nonsense as possible. It is a trainwreck and exactly what we have worked diligently for years to avoid.

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In a matter of days, people using this app have caused all sorts of problems. Arlington National Cemetery has asked people to refrain from doing it on their grounds. Storekeepers are putting signs in store windows telling players to stay away. The police are raising red flags about safety because of people walking into traffic.

 

Geocachers would be well advised to create as much distance from this insipid nonsense as possible. It is a trainwreck and exactly what we have worked diligently for years to avoid.

 

And everyone is calling it something akin to geocaching, which tells me it will be banned as well. :(

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I am here at work and one of my fellow employees now has that Pokemon app on his phone. While in the building here he caught a Pokemon critter. Then while talking with him about it he caught a caterpillar Pokemon that he says was on my shoulder.

I can see some big problems ahead with that. Private property, as well as some with mental issues. A Pokemon critter on my shoulder! Kill it BOOM!!

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I am here at work and one of my fellow employees now has that Pokemon app on his phone. While in the building here he caught a Pokemon critter. Then while talking with him about it he caught a caterpillar Pokemon that he says was on my shoulder.

I can see some big problems ahead with that. Private property, as well as some with mental issues. A Pokemon critter on my shoulder! Kill it BOOM!!

 

Maybe there's an in-app purchase (virtual critter-repellant) that will keep Pokemon off your shoulders?! :ph34r:

 

Anyway to everyone in the US worried about the danger and inconvenience of hordes Pokemon Go players, have no fear - the crowds will diminish in exactly 6-8 weeks, when school starts!

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In a matter of days, people using this app have caused all sorts of problems. Arlington National Cemetery has asked people to refrain from doing it on their grounds. Storekeepers are putting signs in store windows telling players to stay away. The police are raising red flags about safety because of people walking into traffic.

 

Geocachers would be well advised to create as much distance from this insipid nonsense as possible. It is a trainwreck and exactly what we have worked diligently for years to avoid.

 

Just about any human activity has its downsides and dangers - including mainstream things like driving.

 

Any recreational pastime - including geocaching - has its detractors and those who consider it "insipid nonsense". I've personally heard it said or implied about geocaching.

 

Most parents seem to be inspired with religious fervor toward Pokemon Go. Something like, "Hallelujah! The kid is finally out of the computer chair, walking miles each day, getting some sunshine, actually meeting with friends in person! Truly a wondrous miracle! Hallelujah!"

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I wonder if there could be some negative impacts on us?

 

For the most part, the "general public" isn't highly aware of Geocaching. With the surge of players of "Go" and publicity, there is awareness of that game. And some issues; e.g. an example in the UK where a "gym" in the game was a private house. Now the home owner has people all day, every day around his property. Might us Geocachers be mistaken for Go players? It may make it harder for us to be invisible.

 

Apparently, the "gym" example I gave above is a disused church which is now a private house. The game intends to use public places (like churches) as "gyms". But in this case they had information which was 40 years out of date. In the UK, geocaches near churches are very popular. I'm sure we will have some geocaches which are in the same zone as a "gym", meaning both geocachers and go-players acting odd in the same area.

 

Back to the original question - I am a fan of Wherigos. They don't replace physical caches, but they provide an interactive "game" as part of the search. Groundspeak pretty much abandoned Wherigos; leaving it to keen users and third parties to keep it going. An improved "Wherigo-like" technology - perhaps learning from "go" - could enhance my geocaching experience. Not that I want ALL caches to be like that; I still expect the bulk of caches won't need any technology other than a GPS. But I think Groundspeak could do more to embrace technology - a sort of next gen Wherigo - as an additional, optional aspect. I know these won't be for everyone.

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We all want to blame HQ for everything that we think is wrong with geocaching. However, as players, we have a lot of responsibility for what happens to the game. The quality of the caches is becoming an issue, and we are responsible for that. Film containers, pill bottles, plastic jars, thrown under a tree and activited. A piece of paper inside, and that's it. In some cases, the owner doesn't even respond to a " need maintenance request"? I'm guilty of putting some poor caches out there. Not only are they poor quality, but they have taken away a quality location where possibly someone could put a quality cache.

I have some ideas for better caches, but the issue is finding a great location that hasn't been taken by a cache. How do we control this aspect..

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In a matter of days, people using this app have caused all sorts of problems. Arlington National Cemetery has asked people to refrain from doing it on their grounds. Storekeepers are putting signs in store windows telling players to stay away. The police are raising red flags about safety because of people walking into traffic.

 

Geocachers would be well advised to create as much distance from this insipid nonsense as possible. It is a trainwreck and exactly what we have worked diligently for years to avoid.

 

Just about any human activity has its downsides and dangers - including mainstream things like driving.

 

Any recreational pastime - including geocaching - has its detractors and those who consider it "insipid nonsense". I've personally heard it said or implied about geocaching.

 

Most parents seem to be inspired with religious fervor toward Pokemon Go. Something like, "Hallelujah! The kid is finally out of the computer chair, walking miles each day, getting some sunshine, actually meeting with friends in person! Truly a wondrous miracle! Hallelujah!"

 

My child plays outside with friends every day. The real trick is to protect them from device addiction in the first place.

 

But that is beside the point. The actual issue at hand is that geocaching needs to be on guard for the unfair, but inevitable association with this new game that has been implemented in such a careless manner.

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We aren't discussing the other game. We are discussing geocaching. The other game is being referenced as a way to discuss geocaching, and potential changes/enhancements/expansions to the game of geocaching.

 

I don't think it helps communication if we turn the forums into a party game where certain words are banned:

The app with a colon in its name.

The QR-code app.

The app that rhymes with "plurality".

The app that rhymes with "geosmashing". (Oh, no, I mean the OTHER app that rhymes with "geosmashing". No, not geocaching, the OTHER OTHER app that rhymes with "geosmashing".)

The app that rhymes with "there I go". (Oh, wait, that one's okay to talk about, right?)

 

Just say no.

 

Sure, clamp down if people start promoting non-Groundspeak games. But merely mentioning the names of these things in the context of a geocaching discussion should not trigger warnings, message edits, message deletion, thread locking, thread deletion, member banning, or any similar actions.

 

I realize this is Groundspeak's game and I love most everything about it. Geocaching has transformed my life over the last 11 years. But niraD nails it with this statement about a topic that has bothered me for years.

Edited by bflentje
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1) Implement the level system. Put in a ton of factors such as quality, geography, numbers of course, hides, events, souvenirs, recent finds, d/t ratings, tbs owned and moved…. Etc.. then, everyone is ranked from level 1 to 100. I have 6,000 finds What does that really mean compared to the universe?.. Bah.. what is my motivation to go out next weekend to pick up a few caches…. BUT if I am level 49 and it takes me 20 caches, a Wherigo, and a 3/3 challenge cache to hit level 50 I am motivated to get my arse out into the woods this weekend and cache away!! The devil is in the details, but a newbie geocacher should be able to hit level 50 in say 6 months with heavy weights on “what you have done for me lately” stats.

 

2) How about encouraging more social interaction? Perhaps 2 or 3 who log a cache make an automatic event? Not for every cache, just once a day.

 

3) Allow geocachers to join up in a group, or guild. Then rank guilds on their poweress. Geocaching doesn’t lend itself to pvp, but leveraging social interactions could be awesome.

 

 

All of this is already available in Munzee. As far as I know, that isn't/wasn't a GC killer, so I don't see why Pokemon Go would be.

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I'm guessing that IAP stands for "In App Purchase", a fairly common model for obtaining revenue for application developers (primarily games).

 

Yes...like a little game we here are all familiar with...

 

Am6H4UP.png

The modern game Apps are somewhat different: They use "coins" purchased with real money, to spend on building the App, to buy more abilities, and there is no spending limit. The Geocaching App's "In App Purchases" are for site membership. At one time, you could buy a "Game App" such as the Geocaching App, once, and own it. Even Geocaching.com went with the new model of "The App Is Free!! Yay!! (oh, and pay up to actually play)". But if you pay more in the App, you add time to your membership, it's not for special in-app temporary power-ups to purchase again and again.

 

Then there's this:

 

And this: http://www.imore.com/true-cost-free-play

Edited by kunarion
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This Pokemon is taking over every thing, even where Ingress was not a popular game.

 

Some thoughts on Ingress and why it didn't catch on like Pokémon Go:

1 - Nothing comes to you in Ingress. Where you can sit at home or wherever and catch random characters in PG as they wander into your area, Ingress requires actively moving around to various portal locations to hack them, link them and deploy resonators and whatnot.

2 - The Augmented Reality portion is more entertaining. Using the camera to make use of the environment and place these characters in the 'real world' is something apps like Layar have been doing for a while now, but never caught on.

3 - The premise is a bit more simple and based on an existing cultural phenomenon. Catch these characters by flinging balls at them. I don't really know what people do at the various "PokeGyms" or whatever, but from the start people feel more actively involved than they ever do hacking a portal in Ingress. Ingress also doesn't really seem to have a clear premise. I've played it on and off for a few years now and even so I can't really explain it beyond trying to capture XM and link portals. I honestly am always wondering if I'm even playing it correctly...

Definitely the reason "Pokemon Go" is popular is not because it's an update of Ingress, nor even that it's Augmented Reality like Ingress. I'd also believe that it's not because kids go outdoors, and certainly not because it's "an enhanced Geocaching Experience". Nothing like that. It's specifically because it's "Pokémon". This could have been instead released as "The New Pokémon Game" on the Nintendo 3DS as any of their other such social games without AR "Ingress" anything, and be just as popular.

Edited by kunarion
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Definitely the reason "Pokemon Go" is popular is not because it's an update of Ingress, nor even that it's Augmented Reality like Ingress. I'd also believe that it's not because kids go outdoors, and certainly not because it's "an enhanced Geocaching Experience". Nothing like that. It's specifically because it's "Pokémon". This could have been instead released as "The New Pokémon Game" on the Nintendo 3DS as any of their other such social games without AR "Ingress" anything, and be just as popular.

 

I don't have sales figures to quote, but what I'm seeing is a different (i.e. vastly increased) level of interest in "Go" over "yet another new Pokemon game". I think it is the combination of the Pokemon name and the outdoor/augmented reality. So while I agree that a new version of Ingress (with Augmented Reality) would not have been anywhere near as popular, I don't agree that "Go" would be as popular if it was yet another Nintendo 3DS game. It is that combination of the brand and changing the experience to be in the real world that is making this so popular.

 

So logically, for Geocaching - that means that adding similar technology to augment the Geocaching experience won't have the impact of Pokemon Go. And while that might be good for Groundspeak if it did, I'm glad about that. Being selfish, I don't want "everyone" Geocaching. But back to the OP, could some aspect of "Go" enhance Geocaching, perhaps yes. Like a modern "Wherigo" update with augmented reality for example.

 

And then there is the downside of Geocaching getting tarred with the same brush as "Go", as "Go" takes off so fast and causes issues.

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I've introduced geocaching to my boyfriend his his teenage sons and when we found the first one they all said, "uh, that's it? now what?"

 

Like I wrote before - let it drag them away from geocaching. When they grow up and understand what is it really about they can join. I'm 31 now and I'm (among other things) using geocaching to explore areas near my home town that I ignored or wasn't aware of when I still lived with my mom (so till being 19). This comes with age and experience. No need to rush :)

 

In the mean time it will boost our stealth mode in the crowded areas. Now everyone will think we are looking for Pokemons ;)

 

Well, you're missing my point. I'd like someone to go with geocaching. They are 16, 19, and 44. The thrill of the hunt is good. But after that, it doesn't feel modern. It feels like something you'd go do with grandpa to humor him and spend a few hours with him.

 

Geocaching needs to feel more modern. Just because it's been this way for 16 years doesn't mean it always should be.

 

PG is so good because you walk around, you find it, you get it and you get instant logging and feedback. No back and forth with screens. No tabs for info. Just info and feedback. That's a little simplistic for GC, given the complexity of locations, but it's worth a look for the developers.

 

There is a legion of us playing GC who use our phones and will never own a separate gps device. GC could make some money off of us selling enhancements in the app.

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So logically, for Geocaching - that means that adding similar technology to augment the Geocaching experience won't have the impact of Pokemon Go.

There's an iPhone App called "Spyglass" that superimposes the cache location and a compass into a visual image of the area. I have that App, it's a cool tool, and I haven't heard about a mad rush to buy such Apps. And the phone could already do everything that "Pokémon Go" can do except play Pokémon. So I'm guessing your logic is sound. :anicute:

Edited by kunarion
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GC could make some money off of us selling enhancements in the app.

The App is now positioned in exactly that way; free with In-App-Purchases, so it could get all kinds of expensive enhancements beyond the scope "Geocaching" if they want to, or a pay-as-you-go form of Virtual Caches for sure (live connected servers for this kind of thing are not cheap. Remember, it rules out many Geocaches beyond the grid). But I can't figure out why bored people who are bored of Geocaching and thrilled with Ingress (um, has anyone even mentioned Ingress around here before? Weird, since it's been around forever, it is still very much as it always was and it's still boring)... Why you don't go play Ingress Pokémon, go out and play and have fun? Buh-bye! ...Why not allow Boring Geocaching to continue as is, when you already have games you prefer? I don't feel the need to subsidize "free" players of the "enhancements" I won't use. Just as an example, there's some game called Pokémon Go with expensive IAP (somebody is paying for you to play if you aren't), and which also uses lots of phone data while playing. It's all way beyond what I can afford.

Edited by kunarion
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Geocaching needs to feel more modern. Just because it's been this way for 16 years doesn't mean it always should be.

 

PG is so good because you walk around, you find it, you get it and you get instant logging and feedback. No back and forth with screens. No tabs for info. Just info and feedback. That's a little simplistic for GC, given the complexity of locations, but it's worth a look for the developers.

I'm still not sure what "feel more modern" would really look like.

 

Instant logging and feedback? Isn't that available now for those who want it, using the existing apps?

 

Avoiding screens and tabs? Yeah, that's "a little simplistic" for geocaching, but different apps strike different balances between presenting all the information on one screen/tab, vs presenting only the "essential" information and letting users "drill down" to get more information when desired.

 

A level system? A guild system with associated perks for guild members? Are these the kinds of things you think will make geocaching "feel more modern"?

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I would offer them back to everyone, but my PM has expired and they are locked in PMO status. Maybe one of the PMO cache haters will renew my membership so all the free-loaders can play too. :laughing:

See instructions here: 5.4. Premium Membership Lapsed/Cancelled - Can't Change Premium Member Only Status of My Geocache

 

Thanks, that is useful information. I have around 100 PMO listings, that's alot of GC codes. Hopefully someone will renew my PM for me and I won't have to trouble a volunteer reviewer or a lackey. :anicute:

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In a matter of days, people using this app have caused all sorts of problems. Arlington National Cemetery has asked people to refrain from doing it on their grounds. Storekeepers are putting signs in store windows telling players to stay away. The police are raising red flags about safety because of people walking into traffic.

 

Geocachers would be well advised to create as much distance from this insipid nonsense as possible. It is a trainwreck and exactly what we have worked diligently for years to avoid.

Guess it would be like geocachers pulling out into traffic almost causing accidents on power trails, or geocaches being blown up by various police departments. Or places of businesses on lockdown because of a geocache. So where's the real trainwreck. Every time a new game pops up the geocaching world goes into a fit and I find it hilarious.

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It seems people will do silly and inappropriate things in inappropriate places. Like playing pokemon in a national cemetery. Oh wait, we might do that too :)

 

I don't really know how the game is implemented, and I have never played it ... but this is what I imagine:

 

There are two different ideas encompassed in the game.

1.) There are the 'places' -- the pokestops and gyms. These are set by the game developers. That is where the 'location' based part of play comes in.

2.) There are the 'characters' -- the critters that you go and capture and whatnot. This is where the 'AR' part of the game comes in.

 

So the 'characters' will appear wherever someone is playing, whether that is a park, their secure office, or even their own home. But that does not really draw other players to that spot. The programming in the game determines where these imaginary things are, and whether that player should have one nearby. I'm sure it uses image processing from the camera as well as location and proximity and player data to determine where they are, but they are imaginary and can't really draw people to a real life place. If people have their phones in these places, then there will be pokemon there to catch.

 

On the other hand, the 'places' are real life locations, and they are what is drawing a real crowd.

 

So really, geocaching is not as related to the character capturing aspect of the game, although one might think that 'finding' pokemon is like geocaching. Geocaching is actually more related to the pokestop/gym location of the game.

 

Geocaching has review processes and peer processes to make sure that our locations are reasonable for our activities, and we have been through some iterations to figure out where is and is not appropriate for a local area.

But for the pokemon game, we are relying on Nintendo/Niantic to select those places and that they are appropriate. I don't think they have any 'feet on the ground' oversight of locations. And there have been cases where their selection was based on old data or is an otherwise bad choice.

 

And in general, people will play with their phones wherever they are, and may do distracted things when they should be paying more attention.

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Well, you're missing my point. I'd like someone to go with geocaching. They are 16, 19, and 44. The thrill of the hunt is good. But after that, it doesn't feel modern. It feels like something you'd go do with grandpa to humor him and spend a few hours with him.

 

Geocaching needs to feel more modern. Just because it's been this way for 16 years doesn't mean it always should be.

 

PG is so good because you walk around, you find it, you get it and you get instant logging and feedback. No back and forth with screens. No tabs for info. Just info and feedback. That's a little simplistic for GC, given the complexity of locations, but it's worth a look for the developers.

 

There is a legion of us playing GC who use our phones and will never own a separate gps device. GC could make some money off of us selling enhancements in the app.

 

All what you write makes me wonder whether geocaching is the best choice for you (I'm not talking about your companions).

You could e.g. try out the m...... game (where QR codes are scanned - they have a very elaborate system of levels and many other things the OP mentioned), Ingress or maybe even Pokemon Go.

 

It's definitely not an issue smartphone vs dedicated GPS-device. I know cachers who share my geocaching preferences and always cache with their smartphone. None of those however would rely on Google Earth - if you go for hiking caches in mountain terrains one needs decent maps and regardless of whether you use paper maps or digital maps (on smartphones, PC etc), Google Earth and Google map are no reasonable options.

 

What makes me enjoy geocaching is the way to the cache locations, the scenery and the nature along the way and the physical exercise I get. I would not want to drive from cache to cache (that's what you apparently mainly do as you wrote about driving from cache to cache).

 

Of course there are many fans of drive in caches also in my area who mainly cache by car. However at least in my area there are many nice cache constructions that are very far from leaking containers behind a stone with a wet log strip. Maybe you do not select the right caches?

 

As the log is regarded, I always carry along a pen (also outside of geocaching) but do not own a smartphone. I could not scan anything, and I'm not the only such cacher. The logging procedure for caches makes them eligible for a much wider audience - regardless of your equipment, age etc

 

Why changing geocaching so dramatically that it makes those run away who have been geocaching for years just because geocaching is like it is and not like Pokemon Go?

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I see one thing that could be used in geocaching. I rather like virtual caches and there are so few of them and no more are allowed correct? I believe that there was a problem with the armchair logging or follow up from cache owners or something like that? (Please fill me in if I am wrong on that).

 

The technology that is being used could actually be used to breathe new life into virtual caches and bring them back to life. You would have to be at the physical location in order to log your find. Something along the lines of within 25 feet or so.

 

I guess what I am getting at is a hybrid between virtual and Wherigo. Sort of a single stop Wherigo. I have yet to do a Wherigo, so I may be way off base on that as well.

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I see one thing that could be used in geocaching. I rather like virtual caches and there are so few of them and no more are allowed correct? I believe that there was a problem with the armchair logging or follow up from cache owners or something like that? (Please fill me in if I am wrong on that).

 

The technology that is being used could actually be used to breathe new life into virtual caches and bring them back to life. You would have to be at the physical location in order to log your find. Something along the lines of within 25 feet or so.

 

I guess what I am getting at is a hybrid between virtual and Wherigo. Sort of a single stop Wherigo. I have yet to do a Wherigo, so I may be way off base on that as well.

 

This sounds like a perfectly sensible solution to the virtual quandary. Surely this has been suggested to HQ before? Anybody know?

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I see one thing that could be used in geocaching. I rather like virtual caches and there are so few of them and no more are allowed correct? I believe that there was a problem with the armchair logging or follow up from cache owners or something like that? (Please fill me in if I am wrong on that).

 

The technology that is being used could actually be used to breathe new life into virtual caches and bring them back to life. You would have to be at the physical location in order to log your find. Something along the lines of within 25 feet or so.

 

I guess what I am getting at is a hybrid between virtual and Wherigo. Sort of a single stop Wherigo. I have yet to do a Wherigo, so I may be way off base on that as well.

 

This sounds like a perfectly sensible solution to the virtual quandary. Surely this has been suggested to HQ before? Anybody know?

 

I don't think that was the primary issue with virtuals. The issue was reviewing them, saturation, and what was 'worthy'.

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I see one thing that could be used in geocaching. I rather like virtual caches and there are so few of them and no more are allowed correct? I believe that there was a problem with the armchair logging or follow up from cache owners or something like that? (Please fill me in if I am wrong on that).
No. As fuzziebear3 indicated, the problem with virtual caches was the process of reviewing them. The ones that survive today tend to be the better ones. The truly bad ones were never published. And of the ones that were published, the owners who have kept them alive all these years tend to be the owners who hid better virtual caches in the first place.

 

The technology that is being used could actually be used to breathe new life into virtual caches and bring them back to life. You would have to be at the physical location in order to log your find. Something along the lines of within 25 feet or so.

 

I guess what I am getting at is a hybrid between virtual and Wherigo. Sort of a single stop Wherigo. I have yet to do a Wherigo, so I may be way off base on that as well.

Are you familiar with the Geocaching Challenges experiment that Groundspeak tried a few years ago? (Geocaching Challenges were completely different from Challenge Caches.)
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I've introduced geocaching to my boyfriend his his teenage sons and when we found the first one they all said, "uh, that's it? now what?"

 

Like I wrote before - let it drag them away from geocaching. When they grow up and understand what is it really about they can join. I'm 31 now and I'm (among other things) using geocaching to explore areas near my home town that I ignored or wasn't aware of when I still lived with my mom (so till being 19). This comes with age and experience. No need to rush :)

 

In the mean time it will boost our stealth mode in the crowded areas. Now everyone will think we are looking for Pokemons ;)

 

Well, you're missing my point. I'd like someone to go with geocaching. They are 16, 19, and 44. The thrill of the hunt is good. But after that, it doesn't feel modern. It feels like something you'd go do with grandpa to humor him and spend a few hours with him.

 

Geocaching needs to feel more modern. Just because it's been this way for 16 years doesn't mean it always should be.

 

PG is so good because you walk around, you find it, you get it and you get instant logging and feedback. No back and forth with screens. No tabs for info. Just info and feedback. That's a little simplistic for GC, given the complexity of locations, but it's worth a look for the developers.

 

There is a legion of us playing GC who use our phones and will never own a separate gps device. GC could make some money off of us selling enhancements in the app.

 

good points. pg shows how a good game of hide n seek should happen, just fast n fun. the more rules applied to it (hellllllllo hall monitors!) the less fun it becomes.

 

and then compare the ability to keep in playing pg all day without hitting a paywall.... oops i was supposed to forget about that in the comparison.

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... The actual issue at hand is that geocaching needs to be on guard for the unfair, but inevitable association with this new game that has been implemented in such a careless manner.

 

I'm not too worried about the games being confused. They're quite different and the demographics of the participants are quite different. And most posters here seem to not want to change caching to make it more like Pokémon Go. Of course, those is the forum may not be a representative sample of cachers, but those who like higher-tech games are probably already doing them. Caching started with a tech angle (GPS before GPS became popular), but it's fundamentally a lower-tech game that has to do with getting out and visiting places. Those into numbers and other competitive caching elements have probably already found them in power trails, cache-&-dash caching, etc.

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Are you familiar with the Geocaching Challenges experiment that Groundspeak tried a few years ago? (Geocaching Challenges were completely different from Challenge Caches.)
I am not familiar with that niraD.
Geocaching Challenges were basically a real-world GPS-based game that combined aspects of virtual caches and locationless caches. There were apps for iPhone and Android. The basic idea was "go somewhere and do something", but with no review process (eliminating the problem that led to virtual caches being grandfathered).

 

But Groundspeak decided to retire them, as in "remove nearly every indication that they ever existed". Here is all that is left of them now:

https://www.geocaching.com/challenges/default.aspx

 

But thanks to the magic of the wayback machine, you can take a look at the Geocaching Challenges FAQ as it existed just before they pulled the plug:

https://web.archive.org/web/20121126083927/http://www.geocaching.com/challenges/faq.aspx

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In a matter of days, people using this app have caused all sorts of problems. Arlington National Cemetery has asked people to refrain from doing it on their grounds. Storekeepers are putting signs in store windows telling players to stay away. The police are raising red flags about safety because of people walking into traffic.

 

Geocachers would be well advised to create as much distance from this insipid nonsense as possible. It is a trainwreck and exactly what we have worked diligently for years to avoid.

Guess it would be like geocachers pulling out into traffic almost causing accidents on power trails, or geocaches being blown up by various police departments. Or places of businesses on lockdown because of a geocache. So where's the real trainwreck. Every time a new game pops up the geocaching world goes into a fit and I find it hilarious.

 

We are constantly fighting to save the game from the problems you've mentioned.

 

In a matter of days, this new thing has caused more hassle than geocachers cause in a year. And our name is being associated with it. I expect we'll see even more parks and municipal properties become off-limits to GPS games including ours, despite all the efforts we have made to save it.

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... The actual issue at hand is that geocaching needs to be on guard for the unfair, but inevitable association with this new game that has been implemented in such a careless manner.

 

I'm not too worried about the games being confused. They're quite different and the demographics of the participants are quite different. And most posters here seem to not want to change caching to make it more like Pokémon Go. Of course, those is the forum may not be a representative sample of cachers, but those who like higher-tech games are probably already doing them. Caching started with a tech angle (GPS before GPS became popular), but it's fundamentally a lower-tech game that has to do with getting out and visiting places. Those into numbers and other competitive caching elements have probably already found them in power trails, cache-&-dash caching, etc.

 

I have a Google alert for mentions of geocaching in the news. We are being associated with this new game. Groundspeak needs to get in front of this before more harm is done.

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Geocaching has review processes and peer processes to make sure that our locations are reasonable for our activities, and we have been through some iterations to figure out where is and is not appropriate for a local area.

But for the pokemon game, we are relying on Nintendo/Niantec to select those places and that they are appropriate. I don't think they have any 'feet on the ground' oversight of locations. And there have been cases where their selection was based on old data or is an otherwise bad choice.

 

It's about the same. When the Ingress game first came out, users submitted photos and descriptions for potential "portal" locations. They tended to be historical markers and things like churches. Niantec simply imported those locations and made them Pokestops. In other words, the locatons were vetted at about the same level as most geocaches--if it wasn't blatantly and obviously terrible, it passed muster. Just as some caches turn out to be on private property, so too are some Pokestops. Honestly though, I've been educated about things in my town by reading them.

 

As to Pokemon Go versus Geocaching...From what I understand, pokemon tend to show up where Niantec noted high cell phone data usage, also gathered for the Ingress game (from Google services or some such). There's bound to be a lot of overlap between caches and Pokemon in urban areas, but there are zero Pokestops or critters when you get out onto trails. For example, I work at a forest preserve, and our observatory is a gym and there are three Pokestops at our main site (two buildings and a memorial bench). We are out of town and a mile drive (or walk or bike) up a hill. There have been probably a hundred people up there over the last week just for those. So yes, it's crazy. However, none of them have gone out on the trails or near any caches.

 

Aspects of PG that I like? Being able to walk out my door and play without any prep. I can't walk or bike to any caches from my house; I need a decent block of time to go caching because I have to drive a half hour first.

 

What would I adapt to geocaching? Can I get a lure to attach to a cache that will attract trackables?

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... The actual issue at hand is that geocaching needs to be on guard for the unfair, but inevitable association with this new game that has been implemented in such a careless manner.

 

I'm not too worried about the games being confused. They're quite different and the demographics of the participants are quite different. And most posters here seem to not want to change caching to make it more like Pokémon Go. Of course, those is the forum may not be a representative sample of cachers, but those who like higher-tech games are probably already doing them. Caching started with a tech angle (GPS before GPS became popular), but it's fundamentally a lower-tech game that has to do with getting out and visiting places. Those into numbers and other competitive caching elements have probably already found them in power trails, cache-&-dash caching, etc.

 

I have a Google alert for mentions of geocaching in the news. We are being associated with this new game. Groundspeak needs to get in front of this before more harm is done.

 

And what should Groundspeak do, release a statement to the press that were are the bomb scare people and not the walk out in traffic people? :anicute:

 

The sky is NOT falling. :blink: :blink:

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Interesting topic! I was wondering if anyone would connect Pokémon Go with Geocaching! Seems to me there will be people just caching, just Pokémon Going, and some doing both. And never the two shall meet. . . :rolleyes:

 

I tried Geocaching a few years ago. I don't have my caching "sense" yet because most of the meets are on Saturdays and I usually work on Saturdays.

 

But when I read about and Tried Pokemon Go, I immediately thought of doing both While I was out and about anyway.

 

Is that possible?

 

EJKorvette

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The thrill of the hunt is good. But after that, it doesn't feel modern. It feels like something you'd go do with grandpa to humor him and spend a few hours with him.

 

If the modern feel is that app that it's only after your money and privacy data and on top unsafe and let you get in inappropriate places (e.g. Holocaust museum), I have to pass. I even desire for the 'old times' where geocaching wasn't about the points and people wouldn't do anything for that single point/souvenir and went for the outdoor experience with a single find at the end.

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And PG game has just gone full-retard in Poland - you can catch a pokemon in Auschwitz...

 

Polish version but I assume that google translate will be enough to understand: http://tech.wp.pl/kat,1009783,title,Muzeum-Holokaustu-apeluje-o-zaprzestanie-grania-w-Pokemon-Go-na-terenie-pomnika,wid,18420427,wiadomosc.html

 

P.S. Up to now I thought people making selfies there were idiots...

Edited by TheVoytekBear
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And PG game has just gone full-retard in Poland - you can catch a pokemon in Auschwitz...

 

Polish version but I assume that google translate will be enough to understand: http://tech.wp.pl/kat,1009783,title,Muzeum-Holokaustu-apeluje-o-zaprzestanie-grania-w-Pokemon-Go-na-terenie-pomnika,wid,18420427,wiadomosc.html

 

P.S. Up to now I thought people making selfies there were idiots...

 

There is a request form https://support.pokemongo.nianticlabs.com/hc/en-us/requests/new?ticket_form_id=319928 where you can at least request removal of Pokestops on your own property or report issues with dangerous pokestops or gyms as a non-player. Maybe something will be done about your request, maybe after months. PokeStops and gyms after all are virtual, so why should they do anything about it (except for damaged reputation)?

 

If and how you can ban Pokemon critters in general from an area? Who knows, I don't think so. The critters are only virtual. People playing are real and responsible for their behaviour. You can ban that stuff only where you can ban mobile phones or if you are out of cell coverage or use mobile phone jammers like alowed in France for cinemas, concert halls and theatres or elsewhere for jails or at certain uh institutions that feel they have increased safety needs.

 

And for Auschwitz-Birkenau, the geocaches there seem to be outside the camps, although one mentions Museum Security Patrols and there is one at the ramp.

https://www.geocaching.com/map/default.aspx?lat=50.03437&lng=19.21037&z=15# and change to openstreetmap default and zoom in.

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Geocaching is a nice way to play a game outdoors and has some mentally challenging aspects. Pokémon Go, on the other hand is a virtual form of catching roosters and engaging in cockfighting. It gets kids and young adults outdoors, but the base model is disturbing.

 

Pokemon has been around as a card game and many video games for a couple decades. To my knowledge this hasn't caused any increase in people having real fights with real animals. It is just a game.

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What would I adapt to geocaching? Can I get a lure to attach to a cache that will attract trackables?

 

I like that idea. Not to replace physical trackables, but add virtual trackables. If as a CO I lure virtual trackables to my cache, then it may attract more visitors to discover them.

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You can ban that stuff only where you can ban mobile phones or if you are out of cell coverage or use mobile phone jammers like alowed in France for cinemas, concert halls and theatres or elsewhere for jails or at certain uh institutions that feel they have increased safety needs.

Jammers are illegal in the U.S.:

 

https://www.fcc.gov/general/jamming-cell-phones-and-gps-equipment-against-law

 

And likewise in all/most of the EU:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phone_jammer

 

Seems like a pretty slippery slope to use such a device against a silly game. One emergency call that can't get out would pretty much put an end to that sort of cell signal disruption.

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And what should Groundspeak do, release a statement to the press that were are the bomb scare people and not the walk out in traffic people? :anicute:

 

The sky is NOT falling. :blink: :blink:

 

There probably isn't much Groundspeak can do. The sky may not be falling, but for P-Go there is a big storm. It is not far-fetched to imagine a city/town banning "GPS related games" in all city/town parks for example, and having Geocaching swept up in it. Or, where we would normally go unnoticed, geocachers being seen and assumed we are playing P-Go. Which, if P-Go gets a bad name could mean geocachers getting hassled.

 

All speculation, but something to at least be aware of.

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I don't like most things about PG and think it moves in the wrong direction from geocaching.

 

1. Many PG locations are significant in some way, but the game doesn't relate that. If I find a cache at a historical site it will usually tell me about the site or might even incorporate questions with an offset, puzzle, Wherigo, Virtual, or hint.

 

2. I don't like the faction aspect of Ingress and I don't like it in PG. Factions make sense in some games when it provides different strengths and weaknesses, but the only benefit of these games is to give you a side to root for and against.

 

3. I want geocaching to take me new places, not back to the same ones. Thus PG & I aren't helpful.

 

4. Nothing about PG or I seems to incentivize quality.

 

5. To my knowledge PG and I don't offer very useful search features. I know the QR game doesn’t. I want geocaching to take me places I wouldn't otherwise know to go, not to just look for what's near where I happen to be.

 

6. It's not about the numbers. I want geocaching to promote good hides on good locations, not power trails or spamming every parking lot in town.

 

Here is what I think geocaching can learn from PG:

 

1. People can be motivated to get outside with the right incentives.

 

2. People are raving about the social aspect of PG. I don't really understand it, but it seems like an aspect that should be examined for ways to emulate.

 

3. The cache is the least important part of geocaching. People are hyped to find virtual cartoon critters that aren't interested in film cans, tupperware, or even ammo cans. Yes, there are good containers and great containers, but the driving force for most people is either the location/experience or activity.

 

I think my ideal GPS game would be mostly Virtuals, with Wherigo and Puzzle and Multi capabilities. It would have PQ search capabilities, ratings/Favorites, and cache pages for sharing photos and experiences. Basically Waymarking with a much better interface and excluding most of the commercial categories while including more natural/scenic categories. Locations would be tagged with categories instead of multiple listings like Waymarking does now. (I'm not sure what I would do with logging issues though; I wouldn't want it to be a smartphone only game so I wouldn't want to tie it to an app interacting with GPS. How does TripAdvisor deal with this? I'm basically crossing geocaching with TripAdvisor.)

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And what should Groundspeak do, release a statement to the press that were are the bomb scare people and not the walk out in traffic people? :anicute:

 

The sky is NOT falling. :blink: :blink:

 

There probably isn't much Groundspeak can do. The sky may not be falling, but for P-Go there is a big storm. It is not far-fetched to imagine a city/town banning "GPS related games" in all city/town parks for example, and having Geocaching swept up in it. Or, where we would normally go unnoticed, geocachers being seen and assumed we are playing P-Go. Which, if P-Go gets a bad name could mean geocachers getting hassled.

 

All speculation, but something to at least be aware of.

 

do i understand this correctly that people here actually think writing new laws and ordinances banning a gps based GAME is actually feasible, out any way legal?

 

gps is public sector, a person's phone or gps is private property, a person's intent for being at a location is also private. each and every case needs handled individually, or you end up with an idiotic state of 'everyone is guilty'.

 

come on people think

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do i understand this correctly that people here actually think writing new laws and ordinances banning a gps based GAME is actually feasible, out any way legal?

 

gps is public sector, a person's phone or gps is private property, a person's intent for being at a location is also private. each and every case needs handled individually, or you end up with an idiotic state of 'everyone is guilty'.

 

come on people think

Considering that there already are such laws... yes, it's feasible. It already happened.

 

you end up with an idiotic state

Ya think? :ph34r:

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