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Barrikady

Garmin Introduces the Oregon 700 series

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You are lucky that it even runs with a GPX file that large. Garmin's OS does not deal well with large GPX files. GGZ is much better. I think you are imagining a speed issue. They run quicker as the file is indexed and the unit knows where in the file to look.

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Doesn't ggz has a problem with child waypoints and gpx not?

Not a problem just a different way of handling. The caches are saved as caches and the child waypoints as POI. This enables faster indexing.

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Child waypoints can't go in the GGZ. You have a choice of sending them in a GPX and they become waypoints or in a custom POI. I use the GarminExport macro which does everything for you.

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You are lucky that it even runs with a GPX file that large. Garmin's OS does not deal well with large GPX files. GGZ is much better. I think you are imagining a speed issue. They run quicker as the file is indexed and the unit knows where in the file to look.

 

I frequently run geocache GPX files larger than 1GB without issue on my Oregon 650t.

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You are lucky that it even runs with a GPX file that large. Garmin's OS does not deal well with large GPX files. GGZ is much better. I think you are imagining a speed issue. They run quicker as the file is indexed and the unit knows where in the file to look.

 

I frequently run geocache GPX files larger than 1GB without issue on my Oregon 650t.

 

I'd agree, in the past I have certainly run with much larger GPX files than the 463,468 Kb one I quoted, and not encountered any real issues.

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No, I was using GPX. I'm not a fan of GGZ (especially on the 600 series) as it seems to make my GPS run even slower (at the point where I search for the nearest caches) - I guess it needs to decompress the GGZ data in addition to working out what is nearest?

 

The way GGZ works is that there are two main types of file in the ggz (which is just a zip file):

1: a collection of small (I think the guideline is ~ 5MB) GPX files that are what you're used to seeing.

 

2: a very simple "sidecar" xml file that holds lat/lon, cache name, type, container, and a few other things including offsets into the above files and checksums to know when a geocache has changed. It's basically a .loc with info on how each cache is represented in one of the many gpx files that gety bundled.

 

On boot, I'd unpack the GGZ. The contents of (2) have to be read into the database as they're used for search and map display. They need to be fast to access. When a cache is selected, I'd seek into the (compressed, IIRC) file and offset given by the data in (1) for that cache and from there I'd read the long and short cache description and the logs - none of which are available in overview or search screens and which needs to be seen only when you're actually looking at the specific cache. Geocaching.com limits the prose to something like 50K and the number of logs, but other tools can aggregate both beyond that. For this class of device, an on-demand decompress of 50K + the logs should be pretty fast. But since it only has to read and parse the contents on one <wpt> tag, the on-demand part should be fast-ish and it keeps the copy-and-paste Wikipedia entries out of the internal database and on your SD card.

 

It's rather inefficient to create these as you basically have to write the (2)'s and then read them back to build the (1)'s because of the way multi-byte encodings are represented in some XML serializers, but it makes sense for your desktop machine to suffer so your battery-powered ARM doesn't.

 

My mental model of the device's file handling model matches my observations of things like it being terribly slow to boot when it first sees a new .ggz (flurry of database activity, including the "archiving" of caches that used to be on the device and now aren't) and faster when it's not. I think that's also why the device is so crash happy; it's like it doesn't totally shoot down entries of removed caches or handle caches moving from file to file but keeping the same CRC, but that's just my speculation. It's my observation that it crashes a lot, but I don't have repro steps or I'd be on the phne with Garmin until they were tired of me.

 

Not having to keep a copy of the relatively unbounded data in an internal database (cache type + container type + diff + terrain easily fit in two bytes, for example) and keeping that in "long term parking" is likely a key to keeping large data sets.

 

Signed,

Wrote most a GGZ writer for GPSBabel...

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Today, I did some tests with the live data collection from Geocaching.

 

1)

- Looking at the map and sync gives an overview of the caches and collects only minimal info from the cache

- When a cache is opened, all info is collected

- So when you want to do this in the field you have to open the cache before closing the hotspot on your phone

 

2)

- When selecting a pocket query (live geocaching setup - lists), it receives all caches from the pocket query

- I was expecting that the detailed info from the caches was collected too, but that seems not the case. The same minimal info is there and you still have to open all caches before detailed info is there.....

This seems strange unless I'm doing something wrong.

 

Did anyone have different experience with the pocket queries via live geocaching?

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Today, I did some tests with the live data collection from Geocaching.

 

1)

- Looking at the map and sync gives an overview of the caches and collects only minimal info from the cache

- When a cache is opened, all info is collected

- So when you want to do this in the field you have to open the cache before closing the hotspot on your phone

 

2)

- When selecting a pocket query (live geocaching setup - lists), it receives all caches from the pocket query

- I was expecting that the detailed info from the caches was collected too, but that seems not the case. The same minimal info is there and you still have to open all caches before detailed info is there.....

This seems strange unless I'm doing something wrong.

 

Did anyone have different experience with the pocket queries via live geocaching?

 

I would expect any application, map, or plug in with "live"in the name to require a network connection in order function.

 

I don't use "live"maps or applications on my phone for mapping because of this.

 

it's much better to pull all the days needed (waypoints/notes/maps/overlays/etc) while connected to a fast and reliable connection rather than out in the woods. just my experience

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Today, I did some tests with the live data collection from Geocaching.

 

1)

- Looking at the map and sync gives an overview of the caches and collects only minimal info from the cache

- When a cache is opened, all info is collected

- So when you want to do this in the field you have to open the cache before closing the hotspot on your phone

 

2)

- When selecting a pocket query (live geocaching setup - lists), it receives all caches from the pocket query

- I was expecting that the detailed info from the caches was collected too, but that seems not the case. The same minimal info is there and you still have to open all caches before detailed info is there.....

This seems strange unless I'm doing something wrong.

 

Did anyone have different experience with the pocket queries via live geocaching?

 

Your experience is not unique. Unfortunately, that is how Groundspeak is operating this 'feature' at this time. As a premium member, I expect to have all geocache information available once it is on the device, not the crippled (truncated) information that is being provided.

Edited by Atlas Cached

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I would expect any application, map, or plug in with "live"in the name to require a network connection in order function.

 

I don't use "live"maps or applications on my phone for mapping because of this.

 

it's much better to pull all the days needed (waypoints/notes/maps/overlays/etc) while connected to a fast and reliable connection rather than out in the woods. just my experience

 

Seems like you might not be understanding the situation. Even though the PQ contains the information it isn't loading the info and it requires a "live" load of the cache to store the detailed info. At least that is how I read the situation. No one is disputing "live" means connected but it seems an extremely poor experience to force someone to load each and every cache "live" to store the detailed info if it's available in a more offline/batch manner.

 

 

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Today, I did some tests with the live data collection from Geocaching.

 

1)

- Looking at the map and sync gives an overview of the caches and collects only minimal info from the cache

- When a cache is opened, all info is collected

- So when you want to do this in the field you have to open the cache before closing the hotspot on your phone

 

2)

- When selecting a pocket query (live geocaching setup - lists), it receives all caches from the pocket query

- I was expecting that the detailed info from the caches was collected too, but that seems not the case. The same minimal info is there and you still have to open all caches before detailed info is there.....

This seems strange unless I'm doing something wrong.

 

Did anyone have different experience with the pocket queries via live geocaching?

 

Yes, this was all discussed earlier, in detail, in this thread. They need to add an option to download for offline use.

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I would expect any application, map, or plug in with "live"in the name to require a network connection in order function.

 

I don't use "live"maps or applications on my phone for mapping because of this.

 

it's much better to pull all the days needed (waypoints/notes/maps/overlays/etc) while connected to a fast and reliable connection rather than out in the woods. just my experience

 

Seems like you might not be understanding the situation. Even though the PQ contains the information it isn't loading the info and it requires a "live" load of the cache to store the detailed info. At least that is how I read the situation. No one is disputing "live" means connected but it seems an extremely poor experience to force someone to load each and every cache "live" to store the detailed info if it's available in a more offline/batch manner.

 

my understanding is what your post explains.... there maybe be SOME data stored from the live connection/link/app/thing, but not all of it that is available,

that's why I usually avoid things that have "live" in the name.

 

it shouldn't be difficult to change the storage of that function though, to show all the available info, and store it, just as it normally would.

I can only guess this is where the subscription vs non subscription on/off switch might be, or something, no idea.

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Our family has been geocaching for about a year using the iPhone GC app which has accuracy to +-16 feet if the sky is unobstructed. We've found 55 caches so far and recently placed our first cache container. I've been really looking at a handheld GPSr unit and have been torn between the Garmin 64s and Oregon 750. The live feature, touch interface and larger screen of the 750 looks like a nice upgrade (especially since they seem to have gotten it working according to comments on this thread). I always carry my phone whether in a cell dead zone or not and understand any data transfer needs to happen through a working cell connection in the field. We often use the hint and past logs if we have trouble locating a cache. With 4 kids the price of the 64s looks more attractive but the features of the 750 look really nice and the touch screen interface is more user friendly for the kiddos as they have grown up with Apple devices in the house. I'm not sure if it's overkill to consider the 750 but find myself checking this thread a couple of times per week to see comments on it. Our primary use would be for geocaching, some hiking and biking with Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts. I've never owned a GPSr but just picked up a book to help with the somewhat steep learning curve it seems many have complaints about.

 

Can anyone provide some guidance to help me make a purchase? Should I save the money and go with the 64s or is the 750 a better choice? Any other advice? Our kids are ages 8, 8, 10 and 12 so I'd like to teach them how to use the GPSr once I learn it myself. Our 10 year old is the biggest cacher of the kids. The other appeal of a GPRr is the better accuracy of +-9 or 10 feet to help us get more caches although I know if the person who placed it was not accurate then the GPSr is probably no better than an iPhone when there's cell coverage.

 

I called GPS City and they thought the 750 was overkill and recommended the 64s with 24K map. As a guy who loves gadgets I'm leaning toward the newest, best device but as a dad I should probably go with the less expensive 64s.

 

Thanks for any guidance you can provide.

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I called GPS City and they thought the 750 was overkill and recommended the 64s with 24K map. As a guy who loves gadgets I'm leaning toward the newest, best device but as a dad I should probably go with the less expensive 64s.

 

Thanks for any guidance you can provide.

 

It would be ideal if there is a store near where you live where you could try out each unit - or a geocaching event might give you that opportunity. I had a 62s and currently own a Oregon 600. I might have gotten the 64s if it had been available at the time. A lot of it comes down to your personal preferences - buttons v. touch, screen resolution, etc. It is an individual decision. For me, the 600 with the phone meets all my needs - the caching app I use makes it easy to manage offline caching and load caches to the 600 on the fly (with a small device). I rarely use the Oregon, however, so an upgrade did not make sense.

 

Both will get you where you want to go. Both will use free maps. Both will serve you well. And if budget is a factor but you like the Oregon, there may still be some good deals on the 600.

Edited by geodarts

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I called GPS City and they thought the 750 was overkill and recommended the 64s with 24K map. As a guy who loves gadgets I'm leaning toward the newest, best device but as a dad I should probably go with the less expensive 64s.

 

Thanks for any guidance you can provide.

 

Yes, you must look at them yourself. The biggest downside to the 64 is the low resolution screen. It is pretty horrible when seen next to an Oregon and makes map use difficult. An Oregon has 2.5 more pixels than a 64.

 

The comparison, though, is the 700 to the 64S. The 750 has a camera, so is apples and oranges. They don't do a camera in the 64 series.

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I'm really leaning toward the 700 or 750. I checked out the 64s in person at REI. I guess I can't help but compare the screen quality against a smart phone so the 64s doesn't look very good. Also, a little larger screen would be preferable for my older eyes.

 

I can't find the 700 series in person yet. I know the 750 and 750t have the camera which I don't think I need since I would always have my iPhone on me with a better camera. But the 700 has 1.7 gigs of memory versus 4 gigs for the 750. Is this a big issue and worth the extra $100 since they both have SD slots for 32 gigs of additional memory? I was also leaning toward buying the 24K map in SD card form so that would mean only 1.7 gigs of space when the 24K map is loaded. But again I've never used a GPSr so am not sure about how tight the memory can get. Normally more memory is better. If I'm spending $400 should I just spend $500 for the additional memory?

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I would not pay $100 for the memory, personally. A card is easier. I would suggest not getting the maps on the pre-installed card or using the downloaded version. You are better off getting the DVD version and putting them on your own card. The memory is mostly for maps. Other things do not take up much space. You only need a lot of space if you plan to have a lot of different maps. FYI, there are a lot of options for free maps.

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REI doesn't yet have the 700 series in stock, but it's the same screen as the 600, so you can always play with one of those to see if you like look and feel.

 

About the space issue... the answer is no. It is not worth the extra $100 just for the space upgrade unless you also have use for the camera. I would also advise against purchasing the 24K map as there are plenty of free maps available that are just as good or better. That frees you up to add a 16 or 32 GB card to store maps and data at your own pleasure.

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I'm really leaning toward the 700 or 750. I checked out the 64s in person at REI. I guess I can't help but compare the screen quality against a smart phone so the 64s doesn't look very good. Also, a little larger screen would be preferable for my older eyes.

 

I can't find the 700 series in person yet. I know the 750 and 750t have the camera which I don't think I need since I would always have my iPhone on me with a better camera. But the 700 has 1.7 gigs of memory versus 4 gigs for the 750. Is this a big issue and worth the extra $100 since they both have SD slots for 32 gigs of additional memory? I was also leaning toward buying the 24K map in SD card form so that would mean only 1.7 gigs of space when the 24K map is loaded. But again I've never used a GPSr so am not sure about how tight the memory can get. Normally more memory is better. If I'm spending $400 should I just spend $500 for the additional memory?

 

$500 for finding a spot in the woods.... is high over kill. the pixel count won't matter really, since you're never going to edit pictures, input large blocks of text, or manipulate web pages, on the standalone screen. the iPhone, yes, of course you can read web pages and manipulate images very finely, but that's not the point of a stand alone, all it has to do is get you to x/y.

 

if you just want the latest greatest stand alone, you can certainly pay more for it, but it's not going to blow you away with additional features going from a 6x series to a $800 monterra.

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Enjoying my 750. Fast with big gpx / ggx files. Handy size after my Montana, which I still keep in the car. Nice updating via the API. Enjoy the new workflow.

 

Some things I'd like to see:

 

1. use of the old gc.com icon set; the new icons that match the app icon set are too indistinct against topo or Birdseye imagery.

 

2. Ability to add custom "sicky" text to the live logs. Default is a blank log.

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Enjoying my 750. Fast with big gpx / ggx files. Handy size after my Montana, which I still keep in the car. Nice updating via the API. Enjoy the new workflow.

 

Some things I'd like to see:

 

1. use of the old gc.com icon set; the new icons that match the app icon set are too indistinct against topo or Birdseye imagery.

 

Make your own! I did, a long time ago! Never looking back!

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[...]

1. use of the old gc.com icon set; the new icons that match the app icon set are too indistinct against topo or Birdseye imagery.

[...]

Re 1: Use the Custom Symbols Feature (click here).

 

Hans

Edited by HHL

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I googled for this, and looked through this thread and I can't seem to find an answer to what they heck Garmin really means by "You can set your device to automatically stay up to date with all the latest caches from Geocaching.com"

 

Currently I own an Oregon 600, and while the WiFi, BT and App functionality addition is nice, it's not enough to convince me to upgrade. But reading this in the features list had me question what exactly do they mean. Does it go read you PQs when you're connected to WiFi? Is it something else. I'm sure it's not as Ubiquitous as the statement implies, but it may be enough to convince me to buy a 700 and ebay my 600.

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I googled for this, and looked through this thread and I can't seem to find an answer to what they heck Garmin really means by "You can set your device to automatically stay up to date with all the latest caches from Geocaching.com"

 

Currently I own an Oregon 600, and while the WiFi, BT and App functionality addition is nice, it's not enough to convince me to upgrade. But reading this in the features list had me question what exactly do they mean. Does it go read you PQs when you're connected to WiFi? Is it something else. I'm sure it's not as Ubiquitous as the statement implies, but it may be enough to convince me to buy a 700 and ebay my 600.

 

Don't do that just yet.

 

The 7x0 series does not automatically load your PQ's, but when it does work, you can manually load them, as well as geocaches anywhere on the map, in batches of 25. Problem (and a huge one) is, Groundspeak only sends the basic information for each cache (even for your PQ's), and the GPSr is only allowed to load the pertinent information (the information you need to actually find the cache) when you actually open each individual cache to view it. So, if you are out of wifi or cell phone service when you want to view the cache data, not gonna happen, unless you already had it loaded before you left the house, which is exactly what you already do with the 6x0 series.

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I googled for this, and looked through this thread and I can't seem to find an answer to what they heck Garmin really means by "You can set your device to automatically stay up to date with all the latest caches from Geocaching.com"

 

Currently I own an Oregon 600, and while the WiFi, BT and App functionality addition is nice, it's not enough to convince me to upgrade. But reading this in the features list had me question what exactly do they mean. Does it go read you PQs when you're connected to WiFi? Is it something else. I'm sure it's not as Ubiquitous as the statement implies, but it may be enough to convince me to buy a 700 and ebay my 600.

 

Don't do that just yet.

 

The 7x0 series does not automatically load your PQ's, but when it does work, you can manually load them, as well as geocaches anywhere on the map, in batches of 25. Problem (and a huge one) is, Groundspeak only sends the basic information for each cache (even for your PQ's), and the GPSr is only allowed to load the pertinent information (the information you need to actually find the cache) when you actually open each individual cache to view it. So, if you are out of wifi or cell phone service when you want to view the cache data, not gonna happen, unless you already had it loaded before you left the house, which is exactly what you already do with the 6x0 series.

 

Thanks, I watched a couple video's and it looked like they were just using a generic API App to load local info (and of course needing to be Wirelessly tethered via cellphone hotspot.)

 

From what you said, it sounds like it wouldn't load the extra information like cache notes and edited coordinates on Mystery/Puzzle caches. This is the biggest PIA that I deal with on my GPSr (and Smartphone.) I use GSAK and then refresh my caches (About 12K in my local area w/ 50mi radius PQ's over time spans...) I still seem to end up in the field going to the wrong location on occasion thinking that I'm going to the solved coords or not seeing it on my GPSr. It's a bit better on my phone using c:geo as I get the pencil icon over the cache for anything that's got notes or has coords updated and I can at least refresh it.

 

Anyway if I effectively still need to use GSAK, then even with WiFi advantages, it's not worth upgrading for me at this time.

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G'day

 

I am currently looking at upgrading from my Oregon 400 to the Oregon 700. However, reading through this thread, I have some reservations. I was wondering if someone could provide answers to the following please?

 

1. I primarily (99% of the time) load my gpx files through GSAK via the GarminExport Macro. Some people have posted here that there have been issues with this process, and the files being overwritten when the Oregon goes online. Is this still the case? Am I going to be able to still upload my gpx files via this method with relative ease?

 

2. Does anyone have a (rough?) idea of how many caches can be loaded onto the 700? My 400 is limited to 1,975 caches uploaded (via gpx). I do not really understand ggz, but again have read that it seems to have certain limitations. I am going to be travelling to the US from Australia next month, and would love to be able to upload all of the caches nearby to where I will be, and not have to continuously change gpx files like on my previous visit. I currently have a GSAK database of some 18,000 US caches. Is this likely to be able to work on the 700?

 

3. Is it true that when going online to download the nearest 25 caches, the 700 does not filter caches already found (this in itself seems ludicrous to me, and a major oversight by Garmin/Groundspeak)? If so, how do people find this in areas that they have "cached out." For example, near your home. I think it would be great to be able to straight away get the nearest 25 unfound caches sent to the 700, especially if new caches have been published, but I have already found every cache (let's say 1,500) within 30km of my house, I would not want to have to download them all again to eventually receive the latest published and unfound caches. Have users of the 700 found this a limiting factor?

 

I realise that updating from a seven year old device will mean a learning curve and know people that use the 600, so understand that the units work quite differently, in terms of filters and things like that, but also expect that the changes will for the most part be good!

 

Any and all feedback welcome!

 

Thanks,

Hoojar (Greg)

Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

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1. Don't use the LIVE features until they get ironed out by Garmin, you'll be OK.

2. Over 4 million.

3. True. And only basic information for each cache (insufficient to actually find and log) until each individual cache is opened, then the LIVE access is used again to download the rest of the information for that cache alone, updated in your GPSr SQL database, overwriting any reference to GPX/GGZ data you may have already had loaded for that specific cache.

 

Essentially, >90% of the 700 operates just as the Oregon 600, and the Oregon 600 wiki has a ton of information for you!

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In GGZ child waypoints (belonging to a geocache) will be sent to the oregon als POI, not as waypoint. It is better to use gpx. For GSAK you can find a script called GarminExport.gsk that you can use for the Oregon 600/700.

I have upgraded from a 600 to a 750, the 750 is much more accurate in the field. The fun is back in Geocaching, with the 600 we often gave up searching because of its inaccuracy.

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with the 600 we often gave up searching because of its inaccuracy.

 

Something must be wrong with your unit because most of the time I find caches/waypoints within 4m (many times GPS indicates 1m).With early firmware there were crashes but it's been a long time since that happened (now at v5).

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Don't know if something was wrong, but when i was sitting in my garden close to the backdoor the 600 places me there, a few seconds later i was sitting (according to the 600)at the garden gate 12 meters away and the next moment i was sitting in my neighbours garden without leaving my chair. The same happened when searching a geocache.

Doesn't matter anymore, the 600 is gone and the 700 does a much better job.

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G'day

 

I am currently looking at upgrading from my Oregon 400 to the Oregon 700. However, reading through this thread, I have some reservations. I was wondering if someone could provide answers to the following please?

 

1. I primarily (99% of the time) load my gpx files through GSAK via the GarminExport Macro. Some people have posted here that there have been issues with this process, and the files being overwritten when the Oregon goes online. Is this still the case? Am I going to be able to still upload my gpx files via this method with relative ease?

 

2. Does anyone have a (rough?) idea of how many caches can be loaded onto the 700? My 400 is limited to 1,975 caches uploaded (via gpx). I do not really understand ggz, but again have read that it seems to have certain limitations. I am going to be travelling to the US from Australia next month, and would love to be able to upload all of the caches nearby to where I will be, and not have to continuously change gpx files like on my previous visit. I currently have a GSAK database of some 18,000 US caches. Is this likely to be able to work on the 700?

 

3. Is it true that when going online to download the nearest 25 caches, the 700 does not filter caches already found (this in itself seems ludicrous to me, and a major oversight by Garmin/Groundspeak)? If so, how do people find this in areas that they have "cached out." For example, near your home. I think it would be great to be able to straight away get the nearest 25 unfound caches sent to the 700, especially if new caches have been published, but I have already found every cache (let's say 1,500) within 30km of my house, I would not want to have to download them all again to eventually receive the latest published and unfound caches. Have users of the 700 found this a limiting factor?

 

I realise that updating from a seven year old device will mean a learning curve and know people that use the 600, so understand that the units work quite differently, in terms of filters and things like that, but also expect that the changes will for the most part be good!

 

Any and all feedback welcome!

 

Thanks,

Hoojar (Greg)

Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

 

it would be a lot easier to carry a waterproof smartphone on that upcoming trip. 1,2 and 3 would be non-issues. the responses so far still sound like the early adopter phase is still happening. take your old device and the best guess you can do at the caches to load on it. if/when that fails to be fun, whip out the smartphone and use that. the applications available today negate all the bandaid software you're used to using for the old Garmin.

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When will people learn that comparing smartphones to GPSr is like comparing apples to oranges? I don't use my GPSr to make phone calls, and I don't use my smartphone to find geocaches.

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When will people learn that comparing smartphones to GPSr is like comparing apples to oranges? I don't use my GPSr to make phone calls, and I don't use my smartphone to find geocaches.

Because you prefer to use a dedicated GPSr is your personal choice but that doesn't mean your choice is right for everyone. I've found hundreds of caches using my phone as well as hundreds of caches using a dedicated GPSr.

 

My first GPSr I used for caching was a Garmin GPS V back in 2003. I then upgraded to a Garmin GPS 76cs. I stopped caching for a few years and when starting up again, I exclusively used my phone, logging 400+ caches in the past few months. The phone, iPhone 6 in my case, using Cachly works well. Before the end of 2016 I plan on purchasing an Oregon 700, which is why I'm monitoring this thread. Even with that, I will have no issue caching with my phone.

 

What DSLR do you use to take the pictures you post on GC.com? I sure hope they aren't pictures taken with a smartphone - you wouldn't use your DSLR to make phones calls so you shouldn't use your smartphone to take pictures.

 

 

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When will people learn that comparing smartphones to GPSr is like comparing apples to oranges? I don't use my GPSr to make phone calls, and I don't use my smartphone to find geocaches.

 

they aren't that different, really.

 

it's not about smartphone vs stand alone at all. the device he owns now is already familiar. the quirks and work arounds are familiar. a new device that is still having the bugs worked out, just wouldn't be my personal choice for an inter state let alone international trip.

 

the suggestion to carry whatever smartphone is for when pulling out a laptop, wifi access point, charging cables etc, wouldn't be convenient. :-) it's kind of handy for pictures n stuff too.

 

if you wanted to make/take a call through your gps to a paired smartphone, you could. if you wanted to cache with either of them, you could. again, no biggie :-)

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When will people learn that comparing smartphones to GPSr is like comparing apples to oranges? I don't use my GPSr to make phone calls, and I don't use my smartphone to find geocaches.

 

The real question that should be asked because we all own cellphones.

 

Are there enough benefits to spending $100 up to $500 on a GPSr over what a cellphone does.

 

For most people, the answer is no.

 

Now in saying that, I do use my GPSr most of the time because geocaching isn't my main purpose, tracking my bicycle tracks is.

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When will people learn that comparing smartphones to GPSr is like comparing apples to oranges? I don't use my GPSr to make phone calls, and I don't use my smartphone to find geocaches.

 

The real question that should be asked because we all own cellphones.

 

Are there enough benefits to spending $100 up to $500 on a GPSr over what a cellphone does.

 

For most people, the answer is no.

 

Now in saying that, I do use my GPSr most of the time because geocaching isn't my main purpose, tracking my bicycle tracks is.

 

But you can track your bicycle tracks on your phone. Even pair it with a speed, cadence, and heartrate sensor. So I'm not sure you've made a convincing argument.

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The real question that should be asked because we all own cellphones.

 

Cellphone? probably yes, smartphone? No.

And then there's the price for data.

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When will people learn that comparing smartphones to GPSr is like comparing apples to oranges? I don't use my GPSr to make phone calls, and I don't use my smartphone to find geocaches.

 

The real question that should be asked because we all own cellphones.

 

Are there enough benefits to spending $100 up to $500 on a GPSr over what a cellphone does.

 

For most people, the answer is no.

 

Now in saying that, I do use my GPSr most of the time because geocaching isn't my main purpose, tracking my bicycle tracks is.

 

i haven't seen a regular cellphone in maybe a year? kind of contemplated getting a super rugged blackview mini like the old Nokia's, but they be pricey.

 

put one of those new 276cx on your bars, and hang out with the fixie crowd for a few rides.... before you know it there will be a slew of them making vlogs about "timeless design" and "their back to simple times" with pictures of their fixie illuminating the coffee shop sidewalk with that huge gps screen. ;-)

 

jokes aside, tracking a ride and blasting Amazon prime music at the same time, is pretty sweet.

Edited by ohgood

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Still sticking with a purpose built GPSr. When I cache, it's usually for a full (dawn to dusk) day, and the combination of durability and battery life cinch it for me.

Cell phone only used when far from home, and looking to see if there's anything in the 'neighborhood' that I might find on the spur of the moment.

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G'day

 

I am currently looking at upgrading from my Oregon 400 to the Oregon 700. However, reading through this thread, I have some reservations. I was wondering if someone could provide answers to the following please?

 

1. I primarily (99% of the time) load my gpx files through GSAK via the GarminExport Macro. Some people have posted here that there have been issues with this process, and the files being overwritten when the Oregon goes online. Is this still the case? Am I going to be able to still upload my gpx files via this method with relative ease?

 

2. Does anyone have a (rough?) idea of how many caches can be loaded onto the 700? My 400 is limited to 1,975 caches uploaded (via gpx). I do not really understand ggz, but again have read that it seems to have certain limitations. I am going to be travelling to the US from Australia next month, and would love to be able to upload all of the caches nearby to where I will be, and not have to continuously change gpx files like on my previous visit. I currently have a GSAK database of some 18,000 US caches. Is this likely to be able to work on the 700?

 

3. Is it true that when going online to download the nearest 25 caches, the 700 does not filter caches already found (this in itself seems ludicrous to me, and a major oversight by Garmin/Groundspeak)? If so, how do people find this in areas that they have "cached out." For example, near your home. I think it would be great to be able to straight away get the nearest 25 unfound caches sent to the 700, especially if new caches have been published, but I have already found every cache (let's say 1,500) within 30km of my house, I would not want to have to download them all again to eventually receive the latest published and unfound caches. Have users of the 700 found this a limiting factor?

 

I realise that updating from a seven year old device will mean a learning curve and know people that use the 600, so understand that the units work quite differently, in terms of filters and things like that, but also expect that the changes will for the most part be good!

 

Any and all feedback welcome!

 

Thanks,

Hoojar (Greg)

Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

 

Not sure why you'd use the Macro. I've been using the standard File -> Export GPX/POI/GGZ option for a few years now. First on my Oregon 450 and then on my Oregon 600. I use .ggz on my 600. Works like a charm. I've had as many as 100K in my .ggz file and it's no problem. It basically packs them into tiles of gpx's inside the ggz and only pulls out what's needed, so it may only have several thousand on screen. Right now it can support more than the total active geocaches in existence, so even if it is a 4M geocache limit it's beyond what's realistically needed.

 

I had similar questions regarding Live. Sounds like that part is buggy and it's the major change going from the 600 to the 700 that I was interested in. I don't mind plugging in a cable when downloading my .gpx/.ggz from GSAK or loading new .img maps and .kml overlays. Not worth the upgrade to the 700 from the 600. But I'd definitely say I love the 600 over the 400 series. The touch screen is much more sensitive and accurate, about like a smartphone, and the best part is that it's like reading paper when in full sunlight (I turn the backlighting down really low - not quite off, I need to be able to see it when I first turn it on if at night.) I'd also highly recommend programming the lower button as a quick button to toggle the screen off. It does to things, 1 - saves the battery by turning the screen off when you're not using it and 2 - Prevents the tons of touches the screen will get if you're walking around with it clipped on your pack/beltloop/... as you'll end up in some menu somewhere, changing settings (especially the cache filters - and you know there was supposed to be a cache here - why isn't it showing up now...) You'll get use to grabbing it, quick push the screen's on, looking, quick push screen's off put it back...

 

For what it's worth, the differences in operating between the 400 series and the 600/700 series aren't that difficult to figure out. Put it in geocaching mode, click geocache icon, you got three tabs up top - The left most (looks like a play button i.e. triangle pointed to the right ) shows the current selected cache - you can get the description, logs, hints, coordinates, log it .. from that screen, the middle one (looks like a geocache box) shows the list of nearby geoaches, the right most has (filter icon - looks like a funnel) has the filter options - when you look at it it's pretty self explanatory - grey'd out means it's filtered out.

 

Garmin-Oregon-650-geocaching-screens.jpg

 

You may need to spend some time figuring a few things out, but it's mostly intuitive.

 

I don't know if you downloaded the free OSM maps for your 450, but I'd not pay Garmin for what you can get more accurate and up to date maps for free.

 

I'd recommend looking at this website - which gives details about how to load them and a list of various sites to get them from.

 

http://garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com/Maps

 

I like the maps from https://www.openmapchest.org/ for my country/content maps. I've used them in North America, South America and Europe.

 

If you have any questions on how to do this send a message to me on Geocaching.com (TAZ427) - Don't message me through the forum as I don't check it frequently, if you message me through geocaching.com I'll get it and respond quickly.

Edited by TAZ427

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1. Don't use the LIVE features until they get ironed out by Garmin, you'll be OK.

2. Over 4 million.

3. True. And only basic information for each cache (insufficient to actually find and log) until each individual cache is opened, then the LIVE access is used again to download the rest of the information for that cache alone, updated in your GPSr SQL database, overwriting any reference to GPX/GGZ data you may have already had loaded for that specific cache.

 

Essentially, >90% of the 700 operates just as the Oregon 600, and the Oregon 600 wiki has a ton of information for you!

 

 

Not sure why you'd use the Macro. I've been using the standard File -> Export GPX/POI/GGZ option for a few years now. First on my Oregon 450 and then on my Oregon 600. I use .ggz on my 600. Works like a charm. I've had as many as 100K in my .ggz file and it's no problem. It basically packs them into tiles of gpx's inside the ggz and only pulls out what's needed, so it may only have several thousand on screen. Right now it can support more than the total active geocaches in existence, so even if it is a 4M geocache limit it's beyond what's realistically needed.

 

I had similar questions regarding Live. Sounds like that part is buggy and it's the major change going from the 600 to the 700 that I was interested in. I don't mind plugging in a cable when downloading my .gpx/.ggz from GSAK or loading new .img maps and .kml overlays. Not worth the upgrade to the 700 from the 600. But I'd definitely say I love the 600 over the 400 series. The touch screen is much more sensitive and accurate, about like a smartphone, and the best part is that it's like reading paper when in full sunlight (I turn the backlighting down really low - not quite off, I need to be able to see it when I first turn it on if at night.) I'd also highly recommend programming the lower button as a quick button to toggle the screen off. It does to things, 1 - saves the battery by turning the screen off when you're not using it and 2 - Prevents the tons of touches the screen will get if you're walking around with it clipped on your pack/beltloop/... as you'll end up in some menu somewhere, changing settings (especially the cache filters - and you know there was supposed to be a cache here - why isn't it showing up now...) You'll get use to grabbing it, quick push the screen's on, looking, quick push screen's off put it back...

 

For what it's worth, the differences in operating between the 400 series and the 600/700 series aren't that difficult to figure out. Put it in geocaching mode, click geocache icon, you got three tabs up top - The left most (looks like a play button i.e. triangle pointed to the right ) shows the current selected cache - you can get the description, logs, hints, coordinates, log it .. from that screen, the middle one (looks like a geocache box) shows the list of nearby geoaches, the right most has (filter icon - looks like a funnel) has the filter options - when you look at it it's pretty self explanatory - grey'd out means it's filtered out.

 

Garmin-Oregon-650-geocaching-screens.jpg

 

You may need to spend some time figuring a few things out, but it's mostly intuitive.

 

I don't know if you downloaded the free OSM maps for your 450, but I'd not pay Garmin for what you can get more accurate and up to date maps for free.

 

I'd recommend looking at this website - which gives details about how to load them and a list of various sites to get them from.

 

http://garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com/Maps

 

I like the maps from https://www.openmapchest.org/ for my country/content maps. I've used them in North America, South America and Europe.

 

If you have any questions on how to do this send a message to me on Geocaching.com (TAZ427) - Don't message me through the forum as I don't check it frequently, if you message me through geocaching.com I'll get it and respond quickly.

 

Thank you both for your meaningful replies. I have a 700 now sitting on my desk, I am sure I will be in contact if (when!) things get confusing!

 

Greg

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G'day

 

I am currently looking at upgrading from my Oregon 400 to the Oregon 700. However, reading through this thread, I have some reservations. I was wondering if someone could provide answers to the following please?

 

1. I primarily (99% of the time) load my gpx files through GSAK via the GarminExport Macro. Some people have posted here that there have been issues with this process, and the files being overwritten when the Oregon goes online. Is this still the case? Am I going to be able to still upload my gpx files via this method with relative ease?

 

2. Does anyone have a (rough?) idea of how many caches can be loaded onto the 700? My 400 is limited to 1,975 caches uploaded (via gpx). I do not really understand ggz, but again have read that it seems to have certain limitations. I am going to be travelling to the US from Australia next month, and would love to be able to upload all of the caches nearby to where I will be, and not have to continuously change gpx files like on my previous visit. I currently have a GSAK database of some 18,000 US caches. Is this likely to be able to work on the 700?

 

3. Is it true that when going online to download the nearest 25 caches, the 700 does not filter caches already found (this in itself seems ludicrous to me, and a major oversight by Garmin/Groundspeak)? If so, how do people find this in areas that they have "cached out." For example, near your home. I think it would be great to be able to straight away get the nearest 25 unfound caches sent to the 700, especially if new caches have been published, but I have already found every cache (let's say 1,500) within 30km of my house, I would not want to have to download them all again to eventually receive the latest published and unfound caches. Have users of the 700 found this a limiting factor?

 

I realise that updating from a seven year old device will mean a learning curve and know people that use the 600, so understand that the units work quite differently, in terms of filters and things like that, but also expect that the changes will for the most part be good!

 

Any and all feedback welcome!

 

Thanks,

Hoojar (Greg)

Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

 

Not sure why you'd use the Macro. I've been using the standard File -> Export GPX/POI/GGZ option for a few years now. First on my Oregon 450 and then on my Oregon 600. I use .ggz on my 600. Works like a charm. I've had as many as 100K in my .ggz file and it's no problem. It basically packs them into tiles of gpx's inside the ggz and only pulls out what's needed, so it may only have several thousand on screen. Right now it can support more than the total active geocaches in existence, so even if it is a 4M geocache limit it's beyond what's realistically needed.

 

I had similar questions regarding Live. Sounds like that part is buggy and it's the major change going from the 600 to the 700 that I was interested in. I don't mind plugging in a cable when downloading my .gpx/.ggz from GSAK or loading new .img maps and .kml overlays. Not worth the upgrade to the 700 from the 600. But I'd definitely say I love the 600 over the 400 series. The touch screen is much more sensitive and accurate, about like a smartphone, and the best part is that it's like reading paper when in full sunlight (I turn the backlighting down really low - not quite off, I need to be able to see it when I first turn it on if at night.) I'd also highly recommend programming the lower button as a quick button to toggle the screen off. It does to things, 1 - saves the battery by turning the screen off when you're not using it and 2 - Prevents the tons of touches the screen will get if you're walking around with it clipped on your pack/beltloop/... as you'll end up in some menu somewhere, changing settings (especially the cache filters - and you know there was supposed to be a cache here - why isn't it showing up now...) You'll get use to grabbing it, quick push the screen's on, looking, quick push screen's off put it back...

 

For what it's worth, the differences in operating between the 400 series and the 600/700 series aren't that difficult to figure out. Put it in geocaching mode, click geocache icon, you got three tabs up top - The left most (looks like a play button i.e. triangle pointed to the right ) shows the current selected cache - you can get the description, logs, hints, coordinates, log it .. from that screen, the middle one (looks like a geocache box) shows the list of nearby geoaches, the right most has (filter icon - looks like a funnel) has the filter options - when you look at it it's pretty self explanatory - grey'd out means it's filtered out.

 

Garmin-Oregon-650-geocaching-screens.jpg

 

You may need to spend some time figuring a few things out, but it's mostly intuitive.

 

I don't know if you downloaded the free OSM maps for your 450, but I'd not pay Garmin for what you can get more accurate and up to date maps for free.

 

I'd recommend looking at this website - which gives details about how to load them and a list of various sites to get them from.

 

http://garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com/Maps

 

I like the maps from https://www.openmapchest.org/ for my country/content maps. I've used them in North America, South America and Europe.

 

If you have any questions on how to do this send a message to me on Geocaching.com (TAZ427) - Don't message me through the forum as I don't check it frequently, if you message me through geocaching.com I'll get it and respond quickly.

 

Why are there duplicate (and triplicate) listings in the cache list?

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G'day

 

I am currently looking at upgrading from my Oregon 400 to the Oregon 700. However, reading through this thread, I have some reservations. I was wondering if someone could provide answers to the following please?

 

1. I primarily (99% of the time) load my gpx files through GSAK via the GarminExport Macro. Some people have posted here that there have been issues with this process, and the files being overwritten when the Oregon goes online. Is this still the case? Am I going to be able to still upload my gpx files via this method with relative ease?

 

2. Does anyone have a (rough?) idea of how many caches can be loaded onto the 700? My 400 is limited to 1,975 caches uploaded (via gpx). I do not really understand ggz, but again have read that it seems to have certain limitations. I am going to be travelling to the US from Australia next month, and would love to be able to upload all of the caches nearby to where I will be, and not have to continuously change gpx files like on my previous visit. I currently have a GSAK database of some 18,000 US caches. Is this likely to be able to work on the 700?

 

3. Is it true that when going online to download the nearest 25 caches, the 700 does not filter caches already found (this in itself seems ludicrous to me, and a major oversight by Garmin/Groundspeak)? If so, how do people find this in areas that they have "cached out." For example, near your home. I think it would be great to be able to straight away get the nearest 25 unfound caches sent to the 700, especially if new caches have been published, but I have already found every cache (let's say 1,500) within 30km of my house, I would not want to have to download them all again to eventually receive the latest published and unfound caches. Have users of the 700 found this a limiting factor?

 

I realise that updating from a seven year old device will mean a learning curve and know people that use the 600, so understand that the units work quite differently, in terms of filters and things like that, but also expect that the changes will for the most part be good!

 

Any and all feedback welcome!

 

Thanks,

Hoojar (Greg)

Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

 

Not sure why you'd use the Macro. I've been using the standard File -> Export GPX/POI/GGZ option for a few years now. First on my Oregon 450 and then on my Oregon 600. I use .ggz on my 600. Works like a charm. I've had as many as 100K in my .ggz file and it's no problem. It basically packs them into tiles of gpx's inside the ggz and only pulls out what's needed, so it may only have several thousand on screen. Right now it can support more than the total active geocaches in existence, so even if it is a 4M geocache limit it's beyond what's realistically needed.

 

I had similar questions regarding Live. Sounds like that part is buggy and it's the major change going from the 600 to the 700 that I was interested in. I don't mind plugging in a cable when downloading my .gpx/.ggz from GSAK or loading new .img maps and .kml overlays. Not worth the upgrade to the 700 from the 600. But I'd definitely say I love the 600 over the 400 series. The touch screen is much more sensitive and accurate, about like a smartphone, and the best part is that it's like reading paper when in full sunlight (I turn the backlighting down really low - not quite off, I need to be able to see it when I first turn it on if at night.) I'd also highly recommend programming the lower button as a quick button to toggle the screen off. It does to things, 1 - saves the battery by turning the screen off when you're not using it and 2 - Prevents the tons of touches the screen will get if you're walking around with it clipped on your pack/beltloop/... as you'll end up in some menu somewhere, changing settings (especially the cache filters - and you know there was supposed to be a cache here - why isn't it showing up now...) You'll get use to grabbing it, quick push the screen's on, looking, quick push screen's off put it back...

 

For what it's worth, the differences in operating between the 400 series and the 600/700 series aren't that difficult to figure out. Put it in geocaching mode, click geocache icon, you got three tabs up top - The left most (looks like a play button i.e. triangle pointed to the right ) shows the current selected cache - you can get the description, logs, hints, coordinates, log it .. from that screen, the middle one (looks like a geocache box) shows the list of nearby geoaches, the right most has (filter icon - looks like a funnel) has the filter options - when you look at it it's pretty self explanatory - grey'd out means it's filtered out.

 

Garmin-Oregon-650-geocaching-screens.jpg

 

You may need to spend some time figuring a few things out, but it's mostly intuitive.

 

I don't know if you downloaded the free OSM maps for your 450, but I'd not pay Garmin for what you can get more accurate and up to date maps for free.

 

I'd recommend looking at this website - which gives details about how to load them and a list of various sites to get them from.

 

http://garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com/Maps

 

I like the maps from https://www.openmapchest.org/ for my country/content maps. I've used them in North America, South America and Europe.

 

If you have any questions on how to do this send a message to me on Geocaching.com (TAZ427) - Don't message me through the forum as I don't check it frequently, if you message me through geocaching.com I'll get it and respond quickly.

 

Why are there duplicate (and triplicate) listings in the cache list?

 

I probably should have snagged another picture off the internet. I believe the other's are from the now defunct OpenCaching.com (Garmin gave up on having it's own listing service) and parking Waypoints. I've never loaded them so I never see them.

 

A couple more images are more typical

 

garmin_etrex_touch_geocaches_en.jpg

 

This one shows it with D/T info in a star system and black background (Auto switches to the black background at night)

There's also other options to have more are less details as to the direction and distance to cache (i.e. have degrees vs NW general info)

Bug2%2001%20Example%2001.png

Edited by TAZ427

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G'day

 

I am currently looking at upgrading from my Oregon 400 to the Oregon 700. However, reading through this thread, I have some reservations. I was wondering if someone could provide answers to the following please?

 

1. I primarily (99% of the time) load my gpx files through GSAK via the GarminExport Macro. Some people have posted here that there have been issues with this process, and the files being overwritten when the Oregon goes online. Is this still the case? Am I going to be able to still upload my gpx files via this method with relative ease?

 

2. Does anyone have a (rough?) idea of how many caches can be loaded onto the 700? My 400 is limited to 1,975 caches uploaded (via gpx). I do not really understand ggz, but again have read that it seems to have certain limitations. I am going to be travelling to the US from Australia next month, and would love to be able to upload all of the caches nearby to where I will be, and not have to continuously change gpx files like on my previous visit. I currently have a GSAK database of some 18,000 US caches. Is this likely to be able to work on the 700?

 

3. Is it true that when going online to download the nearest 25 caches, the 700 does not filter caches already found (this in itself seems ludicrous to me, and a major oversight by Garmin/Groundspeak)? If so, how do people find this in areas that they have "cached out." For example, near your home. I think it would be great to be able to straight away get the nearest 25 unfound caches sent to the 700, especially if new caches have been published, but I have already found every cache (let's say 1,500) within 30km of my house, I would not want to have to download them all again to eventually receive the latest published and unfound caches. Have users of the 700 found this a limiting factor?

 

I realise that updating from a seven year old device will mean a learning curve and know people that use the 600, so understand that the units work quite differently, in terms of filters and things like that, but also expect that the changes will for the most part be good!

 

Any and all feedback welcome!

 

Thanks,

Hoojar (Greg)

Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

 

Not sure why you'd use the Macro. I've been using the standard File -> Export GPX/POI/GGZ option for a few years now. First on my Oregon 450 and then on my Oregon 600. I use .ggz on my 600. Works like a charm. I've had as many as 100K in my .ggz file and it's no problem. It basically packs them into tiles of gpx's inside the ggz and only pulls out what's needed, so it may only have several thousand on screen. Right now it can support more than the total active geocaches in existence, so even if it is a 4M geocache limit it's beyond what's realistically needed.

 

I had similar questions regarding Live. Sounds like that part is buggy and it's the major change going from the 600 to the 700 that I was interested in. I don't mind plugging in a cable when downloading my .gpx/.ggz from GSAK or loading new .img maps and .kml overlays. Not worth the upgrade to the 700 from the 600. But I'd definitely say I love the 600 over the 400 series. The touch screen is much more sensitive and accurate, about like a smartphone, and the best part is that it's like reading paper when in full sunlight (I turn the backlighting down really low - not quite off, I need to be able to see it when I first turn it on if at night.) I'd also highly recommend programming the lower button as a quick button to toggle the screen off. It does to things, 1 - saves the battery by turning the screen off when you're not using it and 2 - Prevents the tons of touches the screen will get if you're walking around with it clipped on your pack/beltloop/... as you'll end up in some menu somewhere, changing settings (especially the cache filters - and you know there was supposed to be a cache here - why isn't it showing up now...) You'll get use to grabbing it, quick push the screen's on, looking, quick push screen's off put it back...

 

For what it's worth, the differences in operating between the 400 series and the 600/700 series aren't that difficult to figure out. Put it in geocaching mode, click geocache icon, you got three tabs up top - The left most (looks like a play button i.e. triangle pointed to the right ) shows the current selected cache - you can get the description, logs, hints, coordinates, log it .. from that screen, the middle one (looks like a geocache box) shows the list of nearby geoaches, the right most has (filter icon - looks like a funnel) has the filter options - when you look at it it's pretty self explanatory - grey'd out means it's filtered out.

 

Garmin-Oregon-650-geocaching-screens.jpg

 

You may need to spend some time figuring a few things out, but it's mostly intuitive.

 

I don't know if you downloaded the free OSM maps for your 450, but I'd not pay Garmin for what you can get more accurate and up to date maps for free.

 

I'd recommend looking at this website - which gives details about how to load them and a list of various sites to get them from.

 

http://garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com/Maps

 

I like the maps from https://www.openmapchest.org/ for my country/content maps. I've used them in North America, South America and Europe.

 

If you have any questions on how to do this send a message to me on Geocaching.com (TAZ427) - Don't message me through the forum as I don't check it frequently, if you message me through geocaching.com I'll get it and respond quickly.

 

Why are there duplicate (and triplicate) listings in the cache list?

 

There are several caches there that have titles longer than can be displayed, and are not duplicates so much as they are all part of the same series.

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There are several caches there that have titles longer than can be displayed, and are not duplicates so much as they are all part of the same series.

 

Yeah, the ones where the distance is different, but there's ones that the distance was the same, but on different listing sites.

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I noticed that the background wallpaper images seem to be missing from the 700 series. I kind of liked those. Am I missing something obvious or is there a workaround?

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I noticed that the background wallpaper images seem to be missing from the 700 series. I kind of liked those. Am I missing something obvious or is there a workaround?

 

You're not missing anything, those are no more, at least as of the current firmware version 2.60.

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There are several caches there that have titles longer than can be displayed, and are not duplicates so much as they are all part of the same series.

 

Yeah, the ones where the distance is different, but there's ones that the distance was the same, but on different listing sites.

 

You are correct. I know this as those were all my geocaches 8^)

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I'm surprised that the 700 has [differential] support for opencaching.com caches, since the site has been down longer than the 700 has been out.

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