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Barrikady

Garmin Introduces the Oregon 700 series

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I'm surprised that the 700 has [differential] support for opencaching.com caches, since the site has been down longer than the 700 has been out.

 

The 7xx series does not support Garmin Opencaching.com. caches, they show up as normal geocaches.

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I'm surprised that the 700 has [differential] support for opencaching.com caches, since the site has been down longer than the 700 has been out.

 

The 7xx series does not support Garmin Opencaching.com. caches, they show up as normal geocaches.

 

OK. I see now. The screen shots a few posts up are from the 600 series.

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A view from a new 700 owner, who has owned 450 and 650 models previously

 

Activities are basically profiles, but now presented on the first screen and you can slide left and right to select which one. Like profiles, you can set every preference under settings and it locks to that activity. They switch much faster than profiles too (which on my 650 used to crash if the gps had been on for a while) Yes, you can add, delete, edit names and icons relating to them.

 

Overall I think they will be better for many, but need some polishing yet. Some icons are old, some new, some bits are available in multiple places (saving tracklogs for example, is accessible under a slide-up menu on the map page and then you press 'Stop' to access a new save/delete page. The old menu is available, bizarrely, by sliding down and pressing the activity name on that menu. The cohesiveness of the UI is quite poor and I hope Garmin address this quickly.

 

There are a lot of functionally different aspects. Caching itself works similarly, although with different (and to my taste, uglier) icons. Although I have been unable to mark a waypoint or access any of the other waypoint functions from any of the activity pages. (You can map the user key to open it, and the list of functions is now called the 'status page', which can also be mapped). Despite a lot of searching I haven't found a way to access waypoints from the activity menus anywhere.

 

You can revert to 'classic' mode, but I'm not poking that as I want to give Activities more of a good try.

 

There are "IQ Apps", but despite my loading them successfully, according to the Garmin Express software, they aren't showing as available. (Also, there is a very limited selection as yet)

 

The "Geocaching live" works and shows a greater cooperation between Garmin and Groundspeak which has to be good. That said, it's not as well developed or refined as most smartphone apps.

 

Battery life is reasonable, about the 6?? spec. A lot more free space on the internal memory, and uses a memory card in the same way as previous models. (For extra maps)

 

Is the 700 worth the money? Honestly, it's a lot of cash and you could get a great smartphone for that if the live caching is a big thing for you. I prefer to have a separate gps device (battery and ruggedness reasons, mostly) but the gap is less than it was. I wanted to replace my 650 which has done well, but has always been a bit crashy and recently has lost caches halfway through a trip.

 

Overall I wouldn't say jump to this from a 6?? range. If all of the design and UI improvements had been made before release and it hung together in an intuitive way I'd be a lot more positive, but it just doesn't.

 

I don't exactly have buyers remorse, but I don't have buyer's elation either...

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Is the 700 worth the money? Honestly, it's a lot of cash and you could get a great smartphone for that if the live caching is a big thing for you. I prefer to have a separate gps device (battery and ruggedness reasons, mostly) but the gap is less than it was. I wanted to replace my 650 which has done well, but has always been a bit crashy and recently has lost caches halfway through a trip.

 

Overall I wouldn't say jump to this from a 6?? range. If all of the design and UI improvements had been made before release and it hung together in an intuitive way I'd be a lot more positive, but it just doesn't.

 

I don't exactly have buyers remorse, but I don't have buyer's elation either...

 

I pretty much agree with all of this. I have owned a 550, 650 and a 750. The jump from 550 to 650 was immense and well worth the money. The jump from 650 to 750 not so much. The Live Caching has its uses but could definitely be better. The Activites I tried, but found them so awful, I rapidly swapped back to Classic View. I have not been able to get an IQ Apps working, but haven't tried again after I first got the device and found nothing worked.

 

I won't compare it to a Smart Phone, as I often cache in areas where there is no data (and sometimes no phone) signal and I want to be able to have everything stored locally and be able to swap batteries easily.

 

What it should really be compared to is the 600 series and currently the improvements aren't that great. The Live Services are the big selling point from Garmin's point of view, and I try hard NOT to use them (as I prefer to have the full data loaded onto the device via USB), but there are times when I don't have data loaded for the area I happen to be in, and it makes a very handy fallback. However for me the most useful everyday features are the faster processor and the faster upload speed (USB connection). This means when you have a lot of caches loaded and want to find the next nearest cache, you aren't hanging around waiting as long for it to chew through the data, and also when you send the data to the device from GSAK (I use the GarminExport macro) they get put onto the device quite a bit quicker.

 

Therefore to quote dartymoor above "I don't exactly have buyers remorse, but I don't have buyer's elation either..." that pretty much sums it up for me too. When I bought my 650, I did indeed have buyer elation (as it spanks the 550), but I certainly did not get this feeling updating to the 750. There are some useful (but quite minor) updates, but are they really enough to stop people using the 600 series? I'm not so sure...

 

BTW, is the WebUpdater software still a version 2.6? I was expecting a faster turnaround of update releases this early in the 700 series release lifecycle...

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Is the 700 worth the money? Honestly, it's a lot of cash and you could get a great smartphone for that if the live caching is a big thing for you. I prefer to have a separate gps device (battery and ruggedness reasons, mostly) but the gap is less than it was. I wanted to replace my 650 which has done well, but has always been a bit crashy and recently has lost caches halfway through a trip.

 

Overall I wouldn't say jump to this from a 6?? range. If all of the design and UI improvements had been made before release and it hung together in an intuitive way I'd be a lot more positive, but it just doesn't.

 

I don't exactly have buyers remorse, but I don't have buyer's elation either...

 

I pretty much agree with all of this. I have owned a 550, 650 and a 750. The jump from 550 to 650 was immense and well worth the money. The jump from 650 to 750 not so much. The Live Caching has its uses but could definitely be better. The Activites I tried, but found them so awful, I rapidly swapped back to Classic View. I have not been able to get an IQ Apps working, but haven't tried again after I first got the device and found nothing worked.

 

Exactly my experience.

 

I won't compare it to a Smart Phone, as I often cache in areas where there is no data (and sometimes no phone) signal and I want to be able to have everything stored locally and be able to swap batteries easily.

 

What it should really be compared to is the 600 series and currently the improvements aren't that great. The Live Services are the big selling point from Garmin's point of view, and I try hard NOT to use them (as I prefer to have the full data loaded onto the device via USB), but there are times when I don't have data loaded for the area I happen to be in, and it makes a very handy fallback. However for me the most useful everyday features are the faster processor and the faster upload speed (USB connection). This means when you have a lot of caches loaded and want to find the next nearest cache, you aren't hanging around waiting as long for it to chew through the data, and also when you send the data to the device from GSAK (I use the GarminExport macro) they get put onto the device quite a bit quicker.

 

Therefore to quote dartymoor above "I don't exactly have buyers remorse, but I don't have buyer's elation either..." that pretty much sums it up for me too.

 

Me 3.

 

When I bought my 650, I did indeed have buyer elation (as it spanks the 550), but I certainly did not get this feeling updating to the 750. There are some useful (but quite minor) updates, but are they really enough to stop people using the 600 series? I'm not so sure...

 

Nope. Still use my 600 more than the 700.

 

BTW, is the WebUpdater software still a version 2.6? I was expecting a faster turnaround of update releases this early in the 700 series release lifecycle...

 

Same here. New units historically get updates every 6-8 weeks for the first 12-18 months, then taper off. So far, Garmin is already treating 7xx users like yesterdays news, leaving the 7xx series mostly hype without any real execution.

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From the Manual for the 700 - http://www8.garmin.com/manuals/webhelp/oregon7xx/EN-US/GUID-77070B10-3ABF-4904-8FDA-558120F68F3E.html

 

"Select Setup > System > Battery Type.

 

Select Alkaline, Lithium, NiMH, or Precharged NiMH."

 

I have no 'Battery Type' option to select within the 'System' menu. Is this an issue for anyone else? Subsequently, I cannot tell my unit which type of battery I have inside of it.

 

Thanks for your help.

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When I view the recent logs on caches that I have loaded onto my 700 via GPX from GSAK, the dates of the logs are MM/DD/YYYY. In Australia we use the format DD/MM/YYYY. My unit is set to 'Sydney' time zone, and my GSAK is exporting the data to the GPX in DD/MM/YYYY. Does anyone know how to change the date format on the 700?

 

Thanks again for your help!

 

Hoojar

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From the Manual for the 700 - http://www8.garmin.com/manuals/webhelp/oregon7xx/EN-US/GUID-77070B10-3ABF-4904-8FDA-558120F68F3E.html

 

"Select Setup > System > Battery Type.

 

Select Alkaline, Lithium, NiMH, or Precharged NiMH."

 

I have no 'Battery Type' option to select within the 'System' menu. Is this an issue for anyone else? Subsequently, I cannot tell my unit which type of battery I have inside of it.

 

Thanks for your help.

 

Do you have the Garmin battery pack installed? If so, the battery selection is automatic and that menu is no longer available.

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I have no 'Battery Type' option to select within the 'System' menu. Is this an issue for anyone else? Subsequently, I cannot tell my unit which type of battery I have inside of it.

 

Do you have the Garmin battery pack installed? If so, the battery selection is automatic and that menu is no longer available.

 

Yes I have the Garmin Battery Pack installed. That explains it!

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Is the 700 worth the money? Honestly, it's a lot of cash and you could get a great smartphone for that if the live caching is a big thing for you. I prefer to have a separate gps device (battery and ruggedness reasons, mostly) but the gap is less than it was. I wanted to replace my 650 which has done well, but has always been a bit crashy and recently has lost caches halfway through a trip.

 

Overall I wouldn't say jump to this from a 6?? range. If all of the design and UI improvements had been made before release and it hung together in an intuitive way I'd be a lot more positive, but it just doesn't.

 

I don't exactly have buyers remorse, but I don't have buyer's elation either...

 

I pretty much agree with all of this. I have owned a 550, 650 and a 750. The jump from 550 to 650 was immense and well worth the money. The jump from 650 to 750 not so much. The Live Caching has its uses but could definitely be better. The Activites I tried, but found them so awful, I rapidly swapped back to Classic View. I have not been able to get an IQ Apps working, but haven't tried again after I first got the device and found nothing worked.

 

I won't compare it to a Smart Phone, as I often cache in areas where there is no data (and sometimes no phone) signal and I want to be able to have everything stored locally and be able to swap batteries easily.

 

What it should really be compared to is the 600 series and currently the improvements aren't that great. The Live Services are the big selling point from Garmin's point of view, and I try hard NOT to use them (as I prefer to have the full data loaded onto the device via USB), but there are times when I don't have data loaded for the area I happen to be in, and it makes a very handy fallback. However for me the most useful everyday features are the faster processor and the faster upload speed (USB connection). This means when you have a lot of caches loaded and want to find the next nearest cache, you aren't hanging around waiting as long for it to chew through the data, and also when you send the data to the device from GSAK (I use the GarminExport macro) they get put onto the device quite a bit quicker.

 

Therefore to quote dartymoor above "I don't exactly have buyers remorse, but I don't have buyer's elation either..." that pretty much sums it up for me too. When I bought my 650, I did indeed have buyer elation (as it spanks the 550), but I certainly did not get this feeling updating to the 750. There are some useful (but quite minor) updates, but are they really enough to stop people using the 600 series? I'm not so sure...

 

BTW, is the WebUpdater software still a version 2.6? I was expecting a faster turnaround of update releases this early in the 700 series release lifecycle...

 

You don't need data or cellular signals to use the phones GPS functions. You can store everything on a standalone GPS, just like you can on a phone, and access it all without cellular data or signal.

 

It's interesting that people still mention that, I'm assuming they haven't ventured away from the official GC app when they do.

 

I've heard similar take it or leave it impression from people that have paid for the latest 750, most are surprised how little has been improved.

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You don't need data or cellular signals to use the phones GPS functions. You can store everything on a standalone GPS, just like you can on a phone, and access it all without cellular data or signal.

 

It's interesting that people still mention that, I'm assuming they haven't ventured away from the official GC app when they do.

 

I've heard similar take it or leave it impression from people that have paid for the latest 750, most are surprised how little has been improved.

 

I will answer that point in two ways;

 

Firstly, I have never found an android app that is as good as the Oregon for offline caching. The basic geocaching interface on the Garmin is as good as I've seen - everything I expect and need is on the map or the geocaching sub-menu. I use C:Geo on my phone as a fallback, but I found it quite crashy especially if you forget to go backwards. I also paid for Neongeo which I really like for its live map, but it doesn't seem to be in active development any more. If you can recommend an Android app that is as good as the Garmin, uses OSM offline mapping and operates from .ggz files so I can store a lot of caches, and also does cache notes so that I can integrate nicely with GSAK for offline logging, I'll be very interested in trying it! (In fact, if Garmin made an app that replicated the Garmin's geocaching and tracking UI I'd probably pay and use that)

 

Secondly - I have never used an android app that is as BAD as the oregon for ONLINE caching. The much vaunted "Live geocaching" aspect of the new 7xx range is very basic, and that's being kind. However, it is in its early stages and perhaps I shouldn't be so forgiving - but it may be a handy fallback for those days when you forgot to load a recent PQ/GGZ, or the caches got lost somehow.

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You don't need data or cellular signals to use the phones GPS functions. You can store everything on a standalone GPS, just like you can on a phone, and access it all without cellular data or signal.

 

It's interesting that people still mention that, I'm assuming they haven't ventured away from the official GC app when they do.

 

I've heard similar take it or leave it impression from people that have paid for the latest 750, most are surprised how little has been improved.

 

I will answer that point in two ways;

 

Firstly, I have never found an android app that is as good as the Oregon for offline caching. The basic geocaching interface on the Garmin is as good as I've seen - everything I expect and need is on the map or the geocaching sub-menu. I use C:Geo on my phone as a fallback, but I found it quite crashy especially if you forget to go backwards. I also paid for Neongeo which I really like for its live map, but it doesn't seem to be in active development any more. If you can recommend an Android app that is as good as the Garmin, uses OSM offline mapping and operates from .ggz files so I can store a lot of caches, and also does cache notes so that I can integrate nicely with GSAK for offline logging, I'll be very interested in trying it! (In fact, if Garmin made an app that replicated the Garmin's geocaching and tracking UI I'd probably pay and use that)

 

Secondly - I have never used an android app that is as BAD as the oregon for ONLINE caching. The much vaunted "Live geocaching" aspect of the new 7xx range is very basic, and that's being kind. However, it is in its early stages and perhaps I shouldn't be so forgiving - but it may be a handy fallback for those days when you forgot to load a recent PQ/GGZ, or the caches got lost somehow.

 

Whilst I agree with a lot of what dartymoor says (I too have c:geo and the Official App installed on my phone as a fallback, and use my Garmin with GSAK for both loading caches and submitting logs) I would like to add the following.

 

I find the Garmin device is far more accurate, far more likely to lock on to the satellites and has way better battery life than any phone I have ever owned. I can also carry spare AA's in my pocket just in case. The Garmin is also water resistant (I'm often out in the rain), drop resilient and scratch resistant and far more holdable (i.e. fits in my hand much better). To compare a phone to a Garmin is a bit like saying you could take a road car off-roading. Yes, sure you could..., but you'd probably get in to trouble and a Landrover (or other 4wd off-roader) would do a far better job and would almost certainly not let you down. I should probably add here that I like to do my caching out in the wild (think mud, thorns, tree climbing, kayaking etc rather than in the city where a phone may well get you by.

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You don't need data or cellular signals to use the phones GPS functions. You can store everything on a standalone GPS, just like you can on a phone, and access it all without cellular data or signal.

 

It's interesting that people still mention that, I'm assuming they haven't ventured away from the official GC app when they do.

 

I've heard similar take it or leave it impression from people that have paid for the latest 750, most are surprised how little has been improved.

 

I will answer that point in two ways;

 

Firstly, I have never found an android app that is as good as the Oregon for offline caching. The basic geocaching interface on the Garmin is as good as I've seen - everything I expect and need is on the map or the geocaching sub-menu. I use C:Geo on my phone as a fallback, but I found it quite crashy especially if you forget to go backwards. I also paid for Neongeo which I really like for its live map, but it doesn't seem to be in active development any more. If you can recommend an Android app that is as good as the Garmin, uses OSM offline mapping and operates from .ggz files so I can store a lot of caches, and also does cache notes so that I can integrate nicely with GSAK for offline logging, I'll be very interested in trying it! (In fact, if Garmin made an app that replicated the Garmin's geocaching and tracking UI I'd probably pay and use that)

 

Secondly - I have never used an android app that is as BAD as the oregon for ONLINE caching. The much vaunted "Live geocaching" aspect of the new 7xx range is very basic, and that's being kind. However, it is in its early stages and perhaps I shouldn't be so forgiving - but it may be a handy fallback for those days when you forgot to load a recent PQ/GGZ, or the caches got lost somehow.

 

i don't know what you mean by "forget to go backwards" ? I've been beta testing cgeo for a while and not seen a crash yet.

 

cgeo and locus share a gpx file that contains about 13,000 caches. they don't seem to have a problem with handling those, or the other 150mb of tracks and waypoints. I'm not familiar with the ggz format you mentioned, maybe it's proprietary? unfortunately i can't compare anything Garmin to these apps, as I've shelved the stand alones until they can start doing everything as easily as smartphones.

 

gsak is awesome, but there is no Mac OS client, so i don't really have a machine for it to run on, or really a need for it. the phone handles databases very well in locus. I've heard gsak may come to Mac, tomorrow ? ;-)

 

you sugar coated the review of tethering the Garmin you'll a wifi source, it's really poorly done. just my opinion.

 

your solution is working well, don't mess with it.

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i don't know what you mean by "forget to go backwards" ? I've been beta testing cgeo for a while and not seen a crash yet.

 

Last month the garmin let me down - I'd loaded caches from gsak as usual, tested they were all there, set it to the first one. I arrived and did the first cache, hit "Find next closest" (extremely useful feature) and... Nothing. It had lost every other cache.

 

So I switched to the phone and C:Geo. I had to miss the next two caches as I climbed the hill far enough to get a signal, and c:geo took about 20 minutes of weak signal to load the 20 other caches I wanted to do, but it did so and I was able to rescue most of the day.

 

I mention this because it was the first time I used C:Geo for an extended time and it wasn't as good for me - in fact I ended up copying the coords of each cache onto the garmin and setting them as a waypoint for navigating.

 

The "Going backwards" issue is my assumption of why C:Geo would freeze. The screen would stop responding and eventually Android would give its "No longer responding, Wait/Close" warning and I had to bail out. I then learned that if I didn't go from cache to cache each time, instead navigating back from each cache once done to the first menu page, the crashes stopped. So I'm assuming, rightly or wrongly, that it's not freeing memory when used in the way I was doing so. (The phone is a Moto-G4, 2gb ram and plenty of onboard memory, everything else runs well)

 

I don't want to be negative about c:geo because it's the best I've tried and it's truly awesome that it's free and not crippled with adverts. It's just... I don't find the interface as intuitive as Garmin (personal choice) although every feature I want is there, somewhere...

 

It is difficult to be fair and impartial because each of us forms a strong routine for doing this stuff; we have a personal set of tools, systems and methods and there is probably a default negative position when we have to change from that routine. Much as I like tinkering with software and maps, I'd rather things worked perfectly and as I want them when I'm out and caching, allowing me to focus more on my surroundings than on the technology.

 

My perfect system probably will never exist unless I write it, and its user base will be exactly 1 if I do.

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It is difficult to be fair and impartial because each of us forms a strong routine for doing this stuff; we have a personal set of tools, systems and methods and there is probably a default negative position when we have to change from that routine. Much as I like tinkering with software and maps, I'd rather things worked perfectly and as I want them when I'm out and caching, allowing me to focus more on my surroundings than on the technology.

 

My perfect system probably will never exist unless I write it, and its user base will be exactly 1 if I do.

 

The strong routine is probably why passions run high. My routine is based on using my iPhone/iPad (Geosphere) as my cache manager, and loading caches from it to my Oregon 600 or waterproof Android (GCDroid) in specific situations. Others have different routines - and we make judgments based on that. The bottom line (for this thread) is that the 700 gave me no reason to upgrade since it would not change my routine in any way. Perhaps one day there will be the perfect system but then I might decide that my present routine works so well that there is still not any need to upgrade.

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i don't know what you mean by "forget to go backwards" ? I've been beta testing cgeo for a while and not seen a crash yet.

 

Last month the garmin let me down - I'd loaded caches from gsak as usual, tested they were all there, set it to the first one. I arrived and did the first cache, hit "Find next closest" (extremely useful feature) and... Nothing. It had lost every other cache.

 

So I switched to the phone and C:Geo. I had to miss the next two caches as I climbed the hill far enough to get a signal, and c:geo took about 20 minutes of weak signal to load the 20 other caches I wanted to do, but it did so and I was able to rescue most of the day.

 

I mention this because it was the first time I used C:Geo for an extended time and it wasn't as good for me - in fact I ended up copying the coords of each cache onto the garmin and setting them as a waypoint for navigating.

 

The "Going backwards" issue is my assumption of why C:Geo would freeze. The screen would stop responding and eventually Android would give its "No longer responding, Wait/Close" warning and I had to bail out. I then learned that if I didn't go from cache to cache each time, instead navigating back from each cache once done to the first menu page, the crashes stopped. So I'm assuming, rightly or wrongly, that it's not freeing memory when used in the way I was doing so. (The phone is a Moto-G4, 2gb ram and plenty of onboard memory, everything else runs well)

 

I don't want to be negative about c:geo because it's the best I've tried and it's truly awesome that it's free and not crippled with adverts. It's just... I don't find the interface as intuitive as Garmin (personal choice) although every feature I want is there, somewhere...

 

It is difficult to be fair and impartial because each of us forms a strong routine for doing this stuff; we have a personal set of tools, systems and methods and there is probably a default negative position when we have to change from that routine. Much as I like tinkering with software and maps, I'd rather things worked perfectly and as I want them when I'm out and caching, allowing me to focus more on my surroundings than on the technology.

 

My perfect system probably will never exist unless I write it, and its user base will be exactly 1 if I do.

 

oh OK. thanks for the explanation. first off, having a poor signal is bad for processing power/RAM and battery life. personally i do not cache online, because of the issues listed above.

 

my current devices are much older than yours, and have not frozen. i would assume it has something to do with poor signal or trying to pull data from the internet. honestly i have no idea, but i haven't had an application crash in the last three or four months.

 

i would suggest downloading caches prior to leaving a good cellular and or wifi signal area. it's much easier on the battery, and caching offline works much better.

 

normally i use locus or cgeo, but i know the forum is completely against cgeo so i don't provide much info beyond that. i will tell you that gathering data about caches while in a good wifi/cellular area makes for a much better experience.

 

you can use locus to navigate right up to the end of the road, and then guidance for the rest of the easy, or even plot your own path while offline. it's extremely powerful for offline routing/planning, and has the ground speak blessing because it strips out the useful info they want you to pay for. cgeo doesn't play by the rules, and gives a better data set to cache from so it gets lots of hate here. personally i could care less, but you should expect some backlash from mentioning it very much. :-)

 

i think you could get used to using either application while offline just like your stand alone. I've been traveling with only offline applications for years without issue, through some fairly rough terrain. hopefully I'll continue to enjoy it as is for much longer.

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i don't know what you mean by "forget to go backwards" ? I've been beta testing cgeo for a while and not seen a crash yet.

 

Last month the garmin let me down - I'd loaded caches from gsak as usual, tested they were all there, set it to the first one. I arrived and did the first cache, hit "Find next closest" (extremely useful feature) and... Nothing. It had lost every other cache.

 

So I switched to the phone and C:Geo. I had to miss the next two caches as I climbed the hill far enough to get a signal, and c:geo took about 20 minutes of weak signal to load the 20 other caches I wanted to do, but it did so and I was able to rescue most of the day.

 

I mention this because it was the first time I used C:Geo for an extended time and it wasn't as good for me - in fact I ended up copying the coords of each cache onto the garmin and setting them as a waypoint for navigating.

 

The "Going backwards" issue is my assumption of why C:Geo would freeze. The screen would stop responding and eventually Android would give its "No longer responding, Wait/Close" warning and I had to bail out. I then learned that if I didn't go from cache to cache each time, instead navigating back from each cache once done to the first menu page, the crashes stopped. So I'm assuming, rightly or wrongly, that it's not freeing memory when used in the way I was doing so. (The phone is a Moto-G4, 2gb ram and plenty of onboard memory, everything else runs well)

 

I don't want to be negative about c:geo because it's the best I've tried and it's truly awesome that it's free and not crippled with adverts. It's just... I don't find the interface as intuitive as Garmin (personal choice) although every feature I want is there, somewhere...

 

It is difficult to be fair and impartial because each of us forms a strong routine for doing this stuff; we have a personal set of tools, systems and methods and there is probably a default negative position when we have to change from that routine. Much as I like tinkering with software and maps, I'd rather things worked perfectly and as I want them when I'm out and caching, allowing me to focus more on my surroundings than on the technology.

 

My perfect system probably will never exist unless I write it, and its user base will be exactly 1 if I do.

 

I had pretty much the same question. And with the exception of maybe opening a list w/ > 30K geocaches in it. I've seldom seen it crash in the past 5yrs or so (not sense the first few months or so after the group of Android developers took it over from Caramichael or whatever the original creators name was back in 2011 - and then the few issues do to API changes from Groundspeak which were quickly patched.)

 

That said, i've got the same caches stored on my phone as my GPSr. I tend to sync them together w/ GSAK every couple weeks or so and keep all caches w/i about 65mi fresh.

 

The one advantage that c:geo has is definitely being able to update caches as occasionally when looking you want to pull old logs, pictures, and sometimes even the refresh you'll find out that the cache was removed and archived the day before :(

 

I have had the Oregon do the freeze when trying to get Hints, Logs, and other Details. And also had it select the same cache that I'm at when hitting find next cache (got to let it sit for several seconds after marking cache as found to avoid this.)

 

Like was mentioned everyone has there own routines. I prefer my Oregon 600 while walking a trail to grab caches and c:geo when Navigating to a cache by car. And I'll more often then not pull out my phone if I want extra details about a cache, or if I want a quick Sat elite view. As far as accuracy. I can't say I see much difference between my Galaxy S5 vs my Oregon 600. And I'd say my S5 was better than my Oregon 450 was (no GLONASS on the 450)

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I have had the Oregon do the freeze when trying to get Hints, Logs, and other Details. And also had it select the same cache that I'm at when hitting find next cache (got to let it sit for several seconds after marking cache as found to avoid this.)

 

My 650 froze so often I returned it to Garmin after 11 months. Many people said theirs was fine. Garmin replaced it with a brand new one - which did exactly the same thing. Sometimes I would be removing batteries and putting them back in 3 times an hour. (I'm fairly sure it's power related as when the batteries discharge somewhat it actually gets more stable)

 

The 700 hasn't crashed once, touch wood.

 

I was amused to see you mention the re-select same cache when hitting find next - mine did that too and I found the same solution you did. Interestingly, the 700 has this same behaviour - they haven't sorted that out.

 

I have a fresh moan about the 700 - no way to access the waypoint manager (which I use to show distance from my last laid caches) from the Activities mode. I had to revert to Classic mode when laying a new trail today. As classic mode now has no Profiles, it's quite clumsy to have to switch back to activities if I want to change profile/activities.

 

Also it seems to be saving two copies of each tracklog, one coloured as per settings, one not. And despite deleting them in Garmin Basecamp, they keep returning.

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When I view the recent logs on caches that I have loaded onto my 700 via GPX from GSAK, the dates of the logs are MM/DD/YYYY. In Australia we use the format DD/MM/YYYY. My unit is set to 'Sydney' time zone, and my GSAK is exporting the data to the GPX in DD/MM/YYYY. Does anyone know how to change the date format on the 700?

 

Thanks again for your help!

 

Hoojar

 

Does anyone else have this issue, or does no one have a solution :-)

 

Hoojar

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I have had the Oregon do the freeze when trying to get Hints, Logs, and other Details. And also had it select the same cache that I'm at when hitting find next cache (got to let it sit for several seconds after marking cache as found to avoid this.)

 

My 650 froze so often I returned it to Garmin after 11 months. Many people said theirs was fine. Garmin replaced it with a brand new one - which did exactly the same thing. Sometimes I would be removing batteries and putting them back in 3 times an hour. (I'm fairly sure it's power related as when the batteries discharge somewhat it actually gets more stable)

I get that occasionally on my 600. There is no rhyme or reason to it.

Sometimes I can go all day with no issues, other times I need to pull the batteries several times an outing. (For the record, my GPSMAP 62s also did this, so I think it's a common element in some of the firmwares).

 

I was amused to see you mention the re-select same cache when hitting find next - mine did that too and I found the same solution you did. Interestingly, the 700 has this same behaviour - they haven't sorted that out.

My caching buddy uses "find next closest" quite a bit, and you have to wait a bit before actually pressing it.

I think the device takes a bit to mark the cache as being found.

 

We both use GGZ files when we load our devices with GSAK.

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I have a fresh moan about the 700 - no way to access the waypoint manager (which I use to show distance from my last laid caches) from the Activities mode. I had to revert to Classic mode when laying a new trail today. As classic mode now has no Profiles, it's quite clumsy to have to switch back to activities if I want to change profile/activities.

 

Also it seems to be saving two copies of each tracklog, one coloured as per settings, one not. And despite deleting them in Garmin Basecamp, they keep returning.

 

You can have plenty of different Profiles in Classic Mode. In fact the same profiles are in Classic Mode as are in Activity mode. You can either change the profiles in Setup or add the App to your drawer or Main Menu.

 

Could the "two copies"of the tracklog be a GPX and a FIT?

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You can have plenty of different Profiles in Classic Mode. In fact the same profiles are in Classic Mode as are in Activity mode. You can either change the profiles in Setup or add the App to your drawer or Main Menu.

 

Perhaps you'd like to tell me where - because there's no Profile Manager icon and where the Profile section was in Setup is now replaced by Activities, which doesn't act like Profiles at all. (Unless you mean having to switch back into Activity mode to change and then back into Classic)

 

Could the "two copies"of the tracklog be a GPX and a FIT?

 

Ah yes, that'll be it. I did have GPX/FIT enabled, but the only alternative is FIT and I prefer GPX. On the 4x and 6x products, you get to choose either or both, but not with the 7xx. Very strange omission and it means I'll have to continue creating two files for each trip.

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You can have plenty of different Profiles in Classic Mode. In fact the same profiles are in Classic Mode as are in Activity mode. You can either change the profiles in Setup or add the App to your drawer or Main Menu.

 

Perhaps you'd like to tell me where - because there's no Profile Manager icon and where the Profile section was in Setup is now replaced by Activities, which doesn't act like Profiles at all. (Unless you mean having to switch back into Activity mode to change and then back into Classic)

 

Activities is the new term for Profiles. Same thing, different name.

 

Could the "two copies"of the tracklog be a GPX and a FIT?

 

Ah yes, that'll be it. I did have GPX/FIT enabled, but the only alternative is FIT and I prefer GPX. On the 4x and 6x products, you get to choose either or both, but not with the 7xx. Very strange omission and it means I'll have to continue creating two files for each trip.

 

Yes, I also wish there was just a GPX option, so there must be something the FIT file does that they can not do with GPX, thus it is always required?

Edited by Atlas Cached

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Activities is the new term for Profiles. Same thing, different name.

 

Not exactly - as I was saying, in Classic mode you cannot change to another Profile or Activity.

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Activities is the new term for Profiles. Same thing, different name.

 

Not exactly - as I was saying, in Classic mode you cannot change to another Profile or Activity.

Yes, you can, i do it all the time. There is a shortcut that you can place in the main menu, it gives you the option to choose another profile. Or you create your own shortcut that with one click switches directly to the profile of your choice.

I don't remember exactly where i found that already existing schortcut, somewhere in the drawer or you can add it when you are in the drawer, from there you place it in the main menu.

Edited by dopey1311

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Activities is the new term for Profiles. Same thing, different name.

 

Not exactly - as I was saying, in Classic mode you cannot change to another Profile or Activity.

 

You most certainly can!

 

Spend more time with your GPSR, less time online complaining things are not there when they actually are.

 

As I stated, 'Activity' is the new term for 'Profile', and the 'Activity Change' icon on your 7xx will accomplish the same.

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Activities is the new term for Profiles. Same thing, different name.

 

Not exactly - as I was saying, in Classic mode you cannot change to another Profile or Activity.

Yes, you can, i do it all the time. There is a shortcut that you can place in the main menu, it gives you the option to choose another profile. Or you create your own shortcut that with one click switches directly to the profile of your choice.

I don't remember exactly where i found that already existing schortcut, somewhere in the drawer or you can add it when you are in the drawer, from there you place it in the main menu.

 

Ah, thank you. That was the bit of info I was missing.

 

I don't think it's as obvious as Atlas makes out - nowhere is that icon referenced in documentation nor in the setup menu unless you happen to see it.

 

BTW, the 700 has crashed 3 times on me now, each time immediately after hitting "Find next cache". As crashes go it's less hassle than the 650's hang since you can just power up again, but still - I'm disappointed it's not as stable as it should be.

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I have had the Oregon do the freeze when trying to get Hints, Logs, and other Details. And also had it select the same cache that I'm at when hitting find next cache (got to let it sit for several seconds after marking cache as found to avoid this.)

 

My 650 froze so often I returned it to Garmin after 11 months. Many people said theirs was fine. Garmin replaced it with a brand new one - which did exactly the same thing. Sometimes I would be removing batteries and putting them back in 3 times an hour. (I'm fairly sure it's power related as when the batteries discharge somewhat it actually gets more stable)

I get that occasionally on my 600. There is no rhyme or reason to it.

Sometimes I can go all day with no issues, other times I need to pull the batteries several times an outing. (For the record, my GPSMAP 62s also did this, so I think it's a common element in some of the firmwares).

 

I was amused to see you mention the re-select same cache when hitting find next - mine did that too and I found the same solution you did. Interestingly, the 700 has this same behaviour - they haven't sorted that out.

My caching buddy uses "find next closest" quite a bit, and you have to wait a bit before actually pressing it.

I think the device takes a bit to mark the cache as being found.

 

We both use GGZ files when we load our devices with GSAK.

 

Never pulled the batter for the lockup. I simply hold the power button until it powers down and then power it back up. I prefer not to pull the battery as that means I need to recalibrate the compass. Which is another pet-peeve of mine. Why does the compass calibration go out when you pull the battery. I'd think they'd keep the info in long term data storage, but it doesn't appear that way as my compass is never happy after pulling the batteries.

 

One recommendation is to user key (button below the power key) quick push to toggle the screen. It makes life a lot easier if you're hiking and you toggle the screen off as it also stops the touch screen actions (i.e. you're not in some remote menu or didn't accidentally change all your filter settings from it bouncing around.) After you use it a couple times this way, it becomes second nature to hit the button when you grab it to look at at and when you put it away. Everything else stays active with the screen is off, and the on is near instantaneous so it's a great feature.

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Never pulled the batter for the lockup. I simply hold the power button until it powers down and then power it back up. I prefer not to pull the battery as that means I need to recalibrate the compass. Which is another pet-peeve of mine. Why does the compass calibration go out when you pull the battery. I'd think they'd keep the info in long term data storage, but it doesn't appear that way as my compass is never happy after pulling the batteries.

 

I suspect the material and charge level inside each battery affects the compass reading to some small degree, and the calibration is to offset that value. Each time the batteries are removed, the GPSr must assume the newly installed batteries are not the same batteries removed, and re-calibrate to the 'new' batteries.

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"The magnetic signature in AAA batteries can influence compass readings. To prevent this, the Kestrel Weather Meter has a flexible plastic shim that slides in between the batteries"

 

Kestrel shim

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Never pulled the batter for the lockup. I simply hold the power button until it powers down and then power it back up. I prefer not to pull the battery as that means I need to recalibrate the compass. Which is another pet-peeve of mine. Why does the compass calibration go out when you pull the battery. I'd think they'd keep the info in long term data storage, but it doesn't appear that way as my compass is never happy after pulling the batteries.

 

I suspect the material and charge level inside each battery affects the compass reading to some small degree, and the calibration is to offset that value. Each time the batteries are removed, the GPSr must assume the newly installed batteries are not the same batteries removed, and re-calibrate to the 'new' batteries.

 

While there is some small amount of truth to this, it's should be minimal, hence the some small degree. It appears to reset to the factory calibration, which is awful (at least on mine and every person that I know IRL that ones one.) I even tried it with their 'Battery Pack' that I borrowed for a test and still had the same experience.

 

The manual actually states that it was calibrated at the factory, and uses automatic calibrating by default. And it says nothing about needing to re-calibrate after replacing the batteries or that it goes back to factory calibration settings (which appears to be the case, and which are complete crap.)

 

I've never seen it auto calibrate - I've used it for couple long days of caching with frustration the compass being bad and it never got better when I first bought it. It wasn't until I did some looking online and found others that had discovered you need to recalibrate it after changing the batteries did I figure this out.

 

I'd even accept it to a degree if Garmin would have put it in their documentation something like "For best performance, you should re-calibrate the compass after swapping out batteries"

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While there is some small amount of truth to this, it's should be minimal, hence the some small degree. It appears to reset to the factory calibration, which is awful (at least on mine and every person that I know IRL that ones one.) I even tried it with their 'Battery Pack' that I borrowed for a test and still had the same experience.

 

The manual actually states that it was calibrated at the factory, and uses automatic calibrating by default. And it says nothing about needing to re-calibrate after replacing the batteries or that it goes back to factory calibration settings (which appears to be the case, and which are complete crap.)

 

I've never seen it auto calibrate - I've used it for couple long days of caching with frustration the compass being bad and it never got better when I first bought it. It wasn't until I did some looking online and found others that had discovered you need to recalibrate it after changing the batteries did I figure this out.

 

I'd even accept it to a degree if Garmin would have put it in their documentation something like "For best performance, you should re-calibrate the compass after swapping out batteries"

 

It is documented here 8^)

Edited by Atlas Cached

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While there is some small amount of truth to this, it's should be minimal, hence the some small degree. It appears to reset to the factory calibration, which is awful (at least on mine and every person that I know IRL that ones one.) I even tried it with their 'Battery Pack' that I borrowed for a test and still had the same experience.

 

The manual actually states that it was calibrated at the factory, and uses automatic calibrating by default. And it says nothing about needing to re-calibrate after replacing the batteries or that it goes back to factory calibration settings (which appears to be the case, and which are complete crap.)

 

I've never seen it auto calibrate - I've used it for couple long days of caching with frustration the compass being bad and it never got better when I first bought it. It wasn't until I did some looking online and found others that had discovered you need to recalibrate it after changing the batteries did I figure this out.

 

I'd even accept it to a degree if Garmin would have put it in their documentation something like "For best performance, you should re-calibrate the compass after swapping out batteries"

 

It is documented here 8^)

 

This is pretty much my point. It's known well enough to be documented on wiki's but it's not in official Garmin documentation such as their User Manual http://static.garmincdn.com/pumac/Oregon_6xx_OM_EN.pdf

 

I ended up learning more about my device from the garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com than I did from Garmin (i.e. manual and their webpages.) I don't know when that page came about, but I didn't find it until sometime after Geowoodstock 2013 at which point I had it a couple weeks before going to Geowoodstock 2013 and then got to spend a lot of time getting very familiar with it's capabilities as we had a long roadtrip from Houston, TX to Lakeland, FL

 

Overall I still love my Oregon 600, but there's just those couple of things that I need to complain about on occasion. My pet peeve was probably more about the fact that Garmin didn't document that you need to calibrate it every time and also implied that it was calibrated from the factory and would auto-calibrate over time in their manual which either it did a crap job of it or didn't do it at all. I won't give Garmin any credit for a community driven wiki page that has it documented well.

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While there is some small amount of truth to this, it's should be minimal, hence the some small degree. It appears to reset to the factory calibration, which is awful (at least on mine and every person that I know IRL that ones one.) I even tried it with their 'Battery Pack' that I borrowed for a test and still had the same experience.

 

The manual actually states that it was calibrated at the factory, and uses automatic calibrating by default. And it says nothing about needing to re-calibrate after replacing the batteries or that it goes back to factory calibration settings (which appears to be the case, and which are complete crap.)

 

I've never seen it auto calibrate - I've used it for couple long days of caching with frustration the compass being bad and it never got better when I first bought it. It wasn't until I did some looking online and found others that had discovered you need to recalibrate it after changing the batteries did I figure this out.

 

I'd even accept it to a degree if Garmin would have put it in their documentation something like "For best performance, you should re-calibrate the compass after swapping out batteries"

 

It is documented here 8^)

 

This is pretty much my point. It's known well enough to be documented on wiki's but it's not in official Garmin documentation such as their User Manual http://static.garmincdn.com/pumac/Oregon_6xx_OM_EN.pdf

 

I ended up learning more about my device from the garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com than I did from Garmin (i.e. manual and their webpages.) I don't know when that page came about, but I didn't find it until sometime after Geowoodstock 2013 at which point I had it a couple weeks before going to Geowoodstock 2013 and then got to spend a lot of time getting very familiar with it's capabilities as we had a long roadtrip from Houston, TX to Lakeland, FL

 

Overall I still love my Oregon 600, but there's just those couple of things that I need to complain about on occasion. My pet peeve was probably more about the fact that Garmin didn't document that you need to calibrate it every time and also implied that it was calibrated from the factory and would auto-calibrate over time in their manual which either it did a crap job of it or didn't do it at all. I won't give Garmin any credit for a community driven wiki page that has it documented well.

 

Just about every device out three could use a quick compass calibration. I wouldn't beat up Garmin about that. No telling if is the changing environment around the device, the poles, or vibration, but they all get better after a quick calibration.

Edited by ohgood

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Looks like we're finally getting new firmware (2.70) with it updating the following from 2.60

 

Added support for Connect IQ Apps and Widgets

Added background download of geocache descriptions, hints, and logs for geocaching.com premium members

Added power off pressure trend

Improved Geocache Lists experience by adding bookmark lists as well as fixing some issues

Fixed possible issues using Connect IQ Data Fields

Fixed possible issue where calories were not recording with a heart rate monitor connected

Fixed possible shutdown while measuring distance on the map

Fixed fit file support for track logs with greater than 20,000 points

Fixed possible issue reconnecting to speed and cadence sensors after a power cycle

Fixed display issue after rotating on the notification page

Fixed issue where live geocaches would overwrite geocaches loaded via .gpx file

Fixed inconsistant data reporting for current tracks and saved tracks

Fixed possible issues on the turn review page

 

I particularly like the sound of "Fixed issue where live geocaches would overwrite geocaches loaded via .gpx file"

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At first, I thought -- who wouldn't prefer the more recent information. Then I reconsidered when I realized that corrected coordinates created in GSAK or other means might also be overwritten by 'current' data from gc.com. Is that the issue?

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At first, I thought -- who wouldn't prefer the more recent information. Then I reconsidered when I realized that corrected coordinates created in GSAK or other means might also be overwritten by 'current' data from gc.com. Is that the issue?

 

Yes.

 

Previously, if a LIVE GC upload was made, any GPX/GGZ data already on your device was completely removed from the SQL database, leaving you only the information brought by the LIVE GC upload for the geocaches in that upload. If the LIVE GC data was 'removed' from the Oregon 7xx via the Geocaching Options on the device, existing GPX/GGZ data was not restored, leaving you with no information for those geocaches.

 

Firmware 2.70 now simply recognizes when you already have GPX/GGZ information on your device for geocaches in the LIVE GC upload and does not change anything for those caches. Of course, this means you can not get any updated or newer information for these, so they still have not implemented the best solution, but it is an improvement.

 

I was really hoping they would either do as before, and overwrite the SQL database with the newer information UNTIL you remove the LIVE data, and then restore the GPX/GGZ data already on the device, OR simply show both the LIVE GC geocache data AND the device GPX/GGZ geocache data simultaneously, like they used to show both GC.com and Opencaching.com data simultaneously. IE, you might have two listing for the same cache, one is from the device GPX/GGZ data, the other is from the LIVE GC upload. Simply adding a special symbol or note to the listing would help the user differentiate between the LIVE GC and GPX/GGZ entries.

 

GARMIN, are you listening?

Edited by Atlas Cached

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I was really hoping they would either do as before, and overwrite the SQL database with the newer information UNTIL you remove the LIVE data, and then restore the GPX/GGZ data already on the device, OR simply show both the LIVE GC geocache data AND the device GPX/GGZ geocache data simultaneously, like they used to show both GC.com and Opencaching.com data simultaneously. IE, you might have two listing for the same cache, one is from the device GPX/GGZ data, the other is from the LIVE GC upload. Simply adding a special symbol or note to the listing would help the user differentiate between the LIVE GC and GPX/GGZ entries.

 

GARMIN, are you listening?

 

Seems logical - GPX/GGZ data source and an independent "live" data source. Check the "live" data source and if not found pull from the GPX/GGZ data source. Or maybe more appropriately pull from the data source with the latest update date for the specific cache. If the "live" data source remains persistent when a new GPX/GGZ is loaded, the GPX/GGZ might be more up to date.

 

 

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FWIW, an alternative logic is how GCDroid does (an android app).

 

Right at the start it has an "Offline Caches" and an "Online caches" option. The former selects whatever local databases you've got set up (from PQ's, GSAK or manually added GPX files), the latter from live data via the API.

 

I haven't checked but it may also modify things like logging (live or stored)

 

Probably not useful for this context since it would require a full redesign of the UI for Garmin and they won't be keen on that, but it's a logic that's easily understood and keeps both types entirely separate.

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FWIW, an alternative logic is how GCDroid does (an android app).

 

Right at the start it has an "Offline Caches" and an "Online caches" option. The former selects whatever local databases you've got set up (from PQ's, GSAK or manually added GPX files), the latter from live data via the API.

 

I haven't checked but it may also modify things like logging (live or stored)

 

Probably not useful for this context since it would require a full redesign of the UI for Garmin and they won't be keen on that, but it's a logic that's easily understood and keeps both types entirely separate.

 

Comparing a smartphone app to a GPS is like comparing apples to oranges. Smartphones are meant to be connected to the internet at nearly all times, and apps can be built to take advantage of this. GPSs are just now gaining connectivity, and are still built to be relied upon without any kind of wifi or data connection. That's why the GC Live feature on the Oregon 700 automatically downloads queried caches for offline use.

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At first, I thought -- who wouldn't prefer the more recent information. Then I reconsidered when I realized that corrected coordinates created in GSAK or other means might also be overwritten by 'current' data from gc.com. Is that the issue?

 

Yes.

 

Previously, if a LIVE GC upload was made, any GPX/GGZ data already on your device was completely removed from the SQL database, leaving you only the information brought by the LIVE GC upload for the geocaches in that upload. If the LIVE GC data was 'removed' from the Oregon 7xx via the Geocaching Options on the device, existing GPX/GGZ data was not restored, leaving you with no information for those geocaches.

 

Firmware 2.70 now simply recognizes when you already have GPX/GGZ information on your device for geocaches in the LIVE GC upload and does not change anything for those caches. Of course, this means you can not get any updated or newer information for these, so they still have not implemented the best solution, but it is an improvement.

 

I was really hoping they would either do as before, and overwrite the SQL database with the newer information UNTIL you remove the LIVE data, and then restore the GPX/GGZ data already on the device, OR simply show both the LIVE GC geocache data AND the device GPX/GGZ geocache data simultaneously, like they used to show both GC.com and Opencaching.com data simultaneously. IE, you might have two listing for the same cache, one is from the device GPX/GGZ data, the other is from the LIVE GC upload. Simply adding a special symbol or note to the listing would help the user differentiate between the LIVE GC and GPX/GGZ entries.

 

GARMIN, are you listening?

 

I'd like it to update to the latest online information, just so long as it uses my account and corrected coordinates. If it doesn't use this, then I don't want it overwriting my GPX/GGZ unless I explicitly tell it to.

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I have been out of Geocaching for a while and recently got started again.

 

My Oregon 450 is no longer waterproof, a necessity for where I go caching.

The rubber around the power button has completely perished.

 

The Oregon 750 looks like a good upgrade, one question:

 

If you load two different GPX files (I still use GSAK), say one for all of the caches in your local area and another with only caches that you need to complete a challenge (Matrix etc) can you select just one of the GPX files ?

Edited by AndyT1

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If you load two different GPX files (I still use GSAK), say one for all of the caches in your local area and another with only caches that you need to complete a challenge (Matrix etc) can you select just one of the GPX files ?

 

I don't think so - at least, I've never found that functionality. The 7x series behaves very similarly as your 450 in that regard - new gpx or ggz files are scanned when it detects they've changed on startup, but they're all loaded into one big pool and the map is populated.

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AndyT1,

 

Regarding

 

If you load two different GPX files (I still use GSAK), say one for all of the caches in your local area and another with only caches that you need to complete a challenge (Matrix etc) can you select just one of the GPX files ?

 

Yes you can. You can select/deselect the gpx files you want to be active/inactive on the device via the filter screen.

Edited by NumeroForumUser

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AndyT1,

 

Regarding

 

If you load two different GPX files (I still use GSAK), say one for all of the caches in your local area and another with only caches that you need to complete a challenge (Matrix etc) can you select just one of the GPX files ?

 

Yes you can. You can select/deselect the gpx files you want to be active/inactive on the device via the filter screen.

 

You can enable/disable any GPX/GGZ files on the device or uSD card (if installed) as desired. This feature has been requested by more users than I can count, for longer than I can remember. This one single feature may be the biggest selling point for the Oregon 7xx series to Geocachers than any other.

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Thanks so much guys, very much appreciated.

 

Looks like I'm going shopping soon !!!

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Hi all,

 

I've just received my Oregon 700, it's my first GPS and I have a question about SD cards.

 

Which SD card do you recommend? (Size, speed class etc.).

 

I plan to store as much Birdseye mapping as I can whilst I have a years subscription.

 

Thanks for you help

 

G McC

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. [i don't know why we can't delete posts]

Edited by Mineral2

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Hi all,

 

I've just received my Oregon 700, it's my first GPS and I have a question about SD cards.

 

Which SD card do you recommend? (Size, speed class etc.).

 

I plan to store as much Birdseye mapping as I can whilst I have a years subscription.

 

Thanks for you help

 

G McC

 

32 GB has been the largest that any Garmin unit supports, and I'm assuming (based on no quick search results) that the Oregon 700 is not an exception.

 

You should be ok with a Class 10 / UHC 1. You may notice improvements over a Class 4, but Class 10 is still faster than these units are capable of reading/writing. The good news is that these can now be found for $10 or less.

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