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Plutoberth

Why do you still use external GPS devices?

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To OP's question............

1. No data rates or limitations on handheld GPS

2. Coverage more dependable

3. Usually more accurate, particularly when phone signal is weak

4. Can cache and talk at same time

5 Features in a handheld your phone may not have

6. Conserves phone battery for emergency calls and solitaire game on the ride home.

7. The number one reason why carry a handheld along with a phone and other gear...........

When it's all over with, whoever has the most toys wins.

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To OP's question............

1. No data rates or limitations on handheld GPS

2. Coverage more dependable

3. Usually more accurate, particularly when phone signal is weak

4. Can cache and talk at same time

5 Features in a handheld your phone may not have

6. Conserves phone battery for emergency calls and solitaire game on the ride home.

7. The number one reason why carry a handheld along with a phone and other gear...........

When it's all over with, whoever has the most toys wins.

 

1- download beforehand, just like standalone.... standalone can't check for new caches in the field

2- exactly the same 'coverage', if you're talking about gps satellites... standalone has zero 'coverage' if you're talking about cellular coverage

3- completely wrong. see the differences between cellular triangulation vs gps triangulation... phones are more accurate

4- speakerphone... but this doesn't sound like fun to me.

5- suchas ?

6- bring batteries, no worries.

7- well, ok. :)

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Currently I have rescued my old smartphone that I've retired 2 years ago to be my "standalone" gps for geocaching. Only with apps for geocaching/trekking, using it with airplane mode on (anyway it has not sim card), wifi off and gps on (and configuring to not use "Google Play Services" localization, just using the gps chip). With this set up it works quite well for me (ok, i'm not a heavy geocacher) with good gps precision (although it is true that it take a while to reach it, much slower than using a data-assisted smartphone) and quite reduced battery consumption (compared to my regular smartphone). I have offline maps that i can use with the cgeo and all I need is to download a PQ or some caches while i'm in a wifi (at home/hotel/cafe/mall), including log images if needed. The only thing I cannot do, it is to have live data while caching (if there are recent logs...) but, hey, I have my phone with me also to check any "live" data if needed. Furthermore, when I'm going for a long walk I always bring my power bank with me, and it serves for two full loads of my phone.

 

I'm not sure if the precision of a dedicated gps is much higher than that in my "standalone"-gps-phone, or if the battery consumption is dramatically a bottleneck for me if I go for an intensive geocaching day (By now, my record is only 10 in a day, so that's an unknown world for me). At least for me is much more easy to have a deprecated phone I could adapt as gps device (no wires needed to download data, same interface/app, flashlight, it is light, I really don't worry if it breaks [after all it was in a drawer a couple of weeks before], I still can use it as a phone in a true emergency [even without sim card yo can call the emergency number, at least in Spain]).

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Currently I have rescued my old smartphone that I've retired 2 years ago to be my "standalone" gps for geocaching.

What is the brand/model? Very important bit of info ;)

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Currently I have rescued my old smartphone that I've retired 2 years ago to be my "standalone" gps for geocaching.

What is the brand/model? Very important bit of info ;)

 

Sure! It's a Samsung Galaxy Ace II, I think it is from 2012. It wasn't a top model when lauched, with a common GPS chip. Something I realized after some time it was that you have to disable the "localization using Google Play Services" in order to the GPS acquire signal offline.

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Here are some preliminary results of my wading into the brave new world of The Smartphone.

...

Thank you very much for your review, I really appreciate it since this is the only way I consider using a smartphone (Orwell's Telescreens). You saved me a lot of hassle.

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1 google maps and the geocaching app are both poor metrics for offline usage.

I suspect that using a separate app isn't really going to change anything. The location services are part of the OS and are just providing location information to any app that needs location information.

NYPC - Your comment is what I suspected would be true. That is why I questioned ohgood's comment. Any app using my phone's GPS chip would get the same location info, so if the Maps app doesn't register my location than I'd suspect another app wouldn't be able to either.

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1 google maps and the geocaching app are both poor metrics for offline usage.

I suspect that using a separate app isn't really going to change anything. The location services are part of the OS and are just providing location information to any app that needs location information.

NYPC - Your comment is what I suspected would be true. That is why I questioned ohgood's comment. Any app using my phone's GPS chip would get the same location info, so if the Maps app doesn't register my location than I'd suspect another app wouldn't be able to either.

 

it's mo better to TEST than to assume and suspect. go test it. :)

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Currently I have rescued my old smartphone that I've retired 2 years ago to be my "standalone" gps for geocaching. Only with apps for geocaching/trekking, using it with airplane mode on (anyway it has not sim card), wifi off and gps on (and configuring to not use "Google Play Services" localization, just using the gps chip). With this set up it works quite well for me (ok, i'm not a heavy geocacher) with good gps precision (although it is true that it take a while to reach it, much slower than using a data-assisted smartphone) and quite reduced battery consumption (compared to my regular smartphone). I have offline maps that i can use with the cgeo and all I need is to download a PQ or some caches while i'm in a wifi (at home/hotel/cafe/mall), including log images if needed. The only thing I cannot do, it is to have live data while caching (if there are recent logs...) but, hey, I have my phone with me also to check any "live" data if needed. Furthermore, when I'm going for a long walk I always bring my power bank with me, and it serves for two full loads of my phone.

 

I'm not sure if the precision of a dedicated gps is much higher than that in my "standalone"-gps-phone, or if the battery consumption is dramatically a bottleneck for me if I go for an intensive geocaching day (By now, my record is only 10 in a day, so that's an unknown world for me). At least for me is much more easy to have a deprecated phone I could adapt as gps device (no wires needed to download data, same interface/app, flashlight, it is light, I really don't worry if it breaks [after all it was in a drawer a couple of weeks before], I still can use it as a phone in a true emergency [even without sim card yo can call the emergency number, at least in Spain]).

 

thanks for going out and TESTING instead of assuming it wouldn't work ! :)

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1 google maps and the geocaching app are both poor metrics for offline usage.

I suspect that using a separate app isn't really going to change anything. The location services are part of the OS and are just providing location information to any app that needs location information.

NYPC - Your comment is what I suspected would be true. That is why I questioned ohgood's comment. Any app using my phone's GPS chip would get the same location info, so if the Maps app doesn't register my location than I'd suspect another app wouldn't be able to either.

 

it's mo better to TEST than to assume and suspect. go test it. :)

Are you on Android? Actually, the app "GPS Test Plus" may help you. It can clear the A-GPS data and force a fresh download of A-GPS data. That can definitely help. Every once in awhile my phone can't seem to get a GPS location, and that app usually fixes the problem quickly.

Edited by Andronicus

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Currently I have rescued my old smartphone that I've retired 2 years ago to be my "standalone" gps for geocaching. Only with apps for geocaching/trekking, using it with airplane mode on (anyway it has not sim card), wifi off and gps on (and configuring to not use "Google Play Services" localization, just using the gps chip). With this set up it works quite well for me (ok, i'm not a heavy geocacher) with good gps precision (although it is true that it take a while to reach it, much slower than using a data-assisted smartphone) and quite reduced battery consumption (compared to my regular smartphone). I have offline maps that i can use with the cgeo and all I need is to download a PQ or some caches while i'm in a wifi (at home/hotel/cafe/mall), including log images if needed. The only thing I cannot do, it is to have live data while caching (if there are recent logs...) but, hey, I have my phone with me also to check any "live" data if needed. Furthermore, when I'm going for a long walk I always bring my power bank with me, and it serves for two full loads of my phone.

 

I'm not sure if the precision of a dedicated gps is much higher than that in my "standalone"-gps-phone, or if the battery consumption is dramatically a bottleneck for me if I go for an intensive geocaching day (By now, my record is only 10 in a day, so that's an unknown world for me). At least for me is much more easy to have a deprecated phone I could adapt as gps device (no wires needed to download data, same interface/app, flashlight, it is light, I really don't worry if it breaks [after all it was in a drawer a couple of weeks before], I still can use it as a phone in a true emergency [even without sim card yo can call the emergency number, at least in Spain]).

You know what you could do is use wifi or bluetooth tethering to give you old smartphone data while in the field.

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Mental note: Immediately save any cache info for offline use, any time I load it.

 

The advice given above to find an app that works for you was good. After using handheld gpsr units for years, I felt domewhat freer when I upgraded to the iPhone 5 with Geosphere. The transitions between online and offline caching are seamless so I rarely notice when I am switching between one or the other; I linked it to offline maps such as Pocket Earth, Here, Navigon, and GaiaGPS; and have never looked back. I would not want to read a detailed cache description using any other type of device. Once I upgraded from the 3GS the accuracy was comparable to my handheld gpsr - although I do not recommend dropping the phone into water (which I did when I was careless or overconfident when getting out of my kayak).

 

I cache with Bluetooth/wifi off. A battery case more than meets my needs if I will be away from a charger for a long time. I collect photo apps as well and doing photo editing can affect the battery.

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although I do not recommend dropping the phone into water (which I did when I was careless or overconfident when getting out of my kayak).

 

When I had a Garmin 76Cx I would tether it to the deck line under the bungies on the deck of my kayak where I could easily see it. I would even leave there when I was out on the lake doing some rolling practice. I never did actually test to see if it would float (though the specs indicated that it does).

 

 

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1 google maps and the geocaching app are both poor metrics for offline usage.

I suspect that using a separate app isn't really going to change anything. The location services are part of the OS and are just providing location information to any app that needs location information.

NYPC - Your comment is what I suspected would be true. That is why I questioned ohgood's comment. Any app using my phone's GPS chip would get the same location info, so if the Maps app doesn't register my location than I'd suspect another app wouldn't be able to either.

it's mo better to TEST than to assume and suspect. go test it. :)

I tested my phone (LG Optimus Pro G) this past weekend. Was in an area without any cell reception. Put my phone on Airplane Mode, set Location Settings to GPS Only, and opened Locus Map Free. My phone couldn't locate my position after more than 15 minutes. Also tried with the Geocaching-R app and then the Google Maps apps. No luck there either. The manufacturer's specs say my phone has GPS / A-GPS / S-GPS, but I've also read in forums that GPS issues are not uncommon. I'll have to try a hardware fix to remedy that. Testing different apps within the same phone obviously wasn't telling, since none of them worked, so would have to try again when at least one of those apps works.

 

I was able to use a Samsung Galaxy S7 with the same settings, but could only try the Google Maps app. I wasn't able to install other apps on it, since it's not my phone. That phone was able to locate my position within a minute. This would be a good phone for geocaching, since it's a brand new model and is water resistant. From what I've read, the Samsung Galaxy series seems to perform pretty well with GPS functions.

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1 google maps and the geocaching app are both poor metrics for offline usage.

I suspect that using a separate app isn't really going to change anything. The location services are part of the OS and are just providing location information to any app that needs location information.

NYPC - Your comment is what I suspected would be true. That is why I questioned ohgood's comment. Any app using my phone's GPS chip would get the same location info, so if the Maps app doesn't register my location than I'd suspect another app wouldn't be able to either.

it's mo better to TEST than to assume and suspect. go test it. :)

I tested my phone (LG Optimus Pro G) this past weekend. Was in an area without any cell reception. Put my phone on Airplane Mode, set Location Settings to GPS Only, and opened Locus Map Free. My phone couldn't locate my position after more than 15 minutes. Also tried with the Geocaching-R app and then the Google Maps apps. No luck there either. The manufacturer's specs say my phone has GPS / A-GPS / S-GPS, but I've also read in forums that GPS issues are not uncommon. I'll have to try a hardware fix to remedy that. Testing different apps within the same phone obviously wasn't telling, since none of them worked, so would have to try again when at least one of those apps works.

 

I was able to use a Samsung Galaxy S7 with the same settings, but could only try the Google Maps app. I wasn't able to install other apps on it, since it's not my phone. That phone was able to locate my position within a minute. This would be a good phone for geocaching, since it's a brand new model and is water resistant. From what I've read, the Samsung Galaxy series seems to perform pretty well with GPS functions.

 

great! testing!

 

I'm not familiar with that LG model. looks like you've nailed down one device that definitely has issues, given the stuff that pops up on XDA developers about that models issues.

 

good job

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1 google maps and the geocaching app are both poor metrics for offline usage.

I suspect that using a separate app isn't really going to change anything. The location services are part of the OS and are just providing location information to any app that needs location information.

NYPC - Your comment is what I suspected would be true. That is why I questioned ohgood's comment. Any app using my phone's GPS chip would get the same location info, so if the Maps app doesn't register my location than I'd suspect another app wouldn't be able to either.

it's mo better to TEST than to assume and suspect. go test it. :)

I tested my phone (LG Optimus Pro G) this past weekend. Was in an area without any cell reception. Put my phone on Airplane Mode, set Location Settings to GPS Only, and opened Locus Map Free. My phone couldn't locate my position after more than 15 minutes. Also tried with the Geocaching-R app and then the Google Maps apps. No luck there either. The manufacturer's specs say my phone has GPS / A-GPS / S-GPS, but I've also read in forums that GPS issues are not uncommon. I'll have to try a hardware fix to remedy that. Testing different apps within the same phone obviously wasn't telling, since none of them worked, so would have to try again when at least one of those apps works.

 

I was able to use a Samsung Galaxy S7 with the same settings, but could only try the Google Maps app. I wasn't able to install other apps on it, since it's not my phone. That phone was able to locate my position within a minute. This would be a good phone for geocaching, since it's a brand new model and is water resistant. From what I've read, the Samsung Galaxy series seems to perform pretty well with GPS functions.

I had a LG Optimus 7 (running Windows Phone 7), and has similar results as your Pro G.

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My Samsung galaxy 5 doesn't seem to have nearly the accuracy of good old Garmin 60 CSX. My cell phone would have never helped me find a geocache in Ethiopia last year. I love my old GPS.

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I use both a handheld GPS (Garmin 62S) and a smartphone (iPhone 6).

 

1. The GPS is better when I'm out hiking in the woods where I'm likely to lose cell reception.

2. When I know I'll be in an area with poor/no cell reception, it's faster to load the GPS than it is to save caches on the iPhone along with their maps.

3. The batteries in my GPS last a lot longer than my iPhone battery. It's easier to change the GPS batteries than to remember to carry a USB charger for the phone.

4. Even though I have a Lifeproof case for my phone, if I'm navigating across the a boulder garden, bushwacking up a hill or fording a stream, I'd rather have a GPS in my hand (or clipped to my belt or knapsack) than to be holding my iPhone.

5. I prefer creating custom GPX files that filter out caches with lots of DNF's, puzzle caches, etc. It's too many extra steps to get that list onto my iPhone, versus a few mouse clicks to send my filtered list from GSAK to my Garmin.

 

The iPhone is helpful for spur of the moment geocaching in areas with good cell coverage, and for viewing photos if I'm having trouble finding the cache. It's easier to type a field note on my iPhone. Field notes are not yet available in the Geocaching® app so I am forced to keep using the Geocaching Classic app.

 

This says it all.

 

Newer isn't always better!

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My Samsung galaxy 5 doesn't seem to have nearly the accuracy of good old Garmin 60 CSX. My cell phone would have never helped me find a geocache in Ethiopia last year. I love my old GPS.

 

I've used one of those briefly, if Google services are allowed it's about +/- 50 feet, but with "GPS only" it stayed constraint at +/-9 feet.

 

what are your settings?

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My Samsung galaxy 5 doesn't seem to have nearly the accuracy of good old Garmin 60 CSX. My cell phone would have never helped me find a geocache in Ethiopia last year. I love my old GPS.

 

I've also found that cache in Ethiopia. That's not a very good example as it can easily be found without a GPS at all. I also prefer my handheld GPS when geocaching abroad without a data plan. The only exception was in Cuba (where I am likely to return in April) where it's illegal to bring a handheld GPS into the country.

 

 

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I just dusted off my Magellan 710 and went out caching for the first time in about 3 years. I also downloaded the app for my phone and found the app to be very cumbersome to use and the app doesn't allow you to find 95% of the caches unless you're a premium member. For someone like me who goes long periods of time without caching I cant justify buying a premium membership and the app is useless without it

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I just dusted off my Magellan 710 and went out caching for the first time in about 3 years. I also downloaded the app for my phone and found the app to be very cumbersome to use and the app doesn't allow you to find 95% of the caches unless you're a premium member. For someone like me who goes long periods of time without caching I cant justify buying a premium membership and the app is useless without it

 

There are a number of different apps on various platforms - some are more useful than others. Third party apps that use the Groundspeak API allow standard members to obtain the full (paperless) cache information for three caches a day and the basic "light" cache information for 10000 a day (regardless of the type or difficulty level). But if you have the system down with the Magellan there is no reason to switch.

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One other thing: it's legal to drive with a GPSr in hand, but not a phone. My car GPS unit doesn't accept coordinates, only addresses, intersections, etc. I can load the parking waypoint for a geocache into my GPSr and navigate with that, holding the unit with both hands on the wheel and my eyes always forward on the road. The screen of the GPSr is in my field of vision even when I am watching the road. I find it safer than having to look at the dashboard GPSr and sometimes reach over to press a button or the screen. If I leave the main roads into non-mapped areas such as huge mall parking areas or a series of campground parking areas I can switch off road mode and still drive.

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One other thing: it's legal to drive with a GPSr in hand, but not a phone. My car GPS unit doesn't accept coordinates, only addresses, intersections, etc. I can load the parking waypoint for a geocache into my GPSr and navigate with that, holding the unit with both hands on the wheel and my eyes always forward on the road. The screen of the GPSr is in my field of vision even when I am watching the road. I find it safer than having to look at the dashboard GPSr and sometimes reach over to press a button or the screen. If I leave the main roads into non-mapped areas such as huge mall parking areas or a series of campground parking areas I can switch off road mode and still drive.

I would suggest that this rule applies where you are and mileage will vary wildly away from your exact location. I know if you attempted to hold something in both your hands at all while driving here you would have very little sympathy when pulled up.

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One other thing: it's legal to drive with a GPSr in hand, but not a phone. My car GPS unit doesn't accept coordinates, only addresses, intersections, etc. I can load the parking waypoint for a geocache into my GPSr and navigate with that, holding the unit with both hands on the wheel and my eyes always forward on the road. The screen of the GPSr is in my field of vision even when I am watching the road. I find it safer than having to look at the dashboard GPSr and sometimes reach over to press a button or the screen. If I leave the main roads into non-mapped areas such as huge mall parking areas or a series of campground parking areas I can switch off road mode and still drive.

 

i watched a guy jump several parking curbs while messing with either a gps or phone on his dash, in a parking lot. i already knew it was a bad idea, but the sparks were a nice reminder.

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One other thing: it's legal to drive with a GPSr in hand, but not a phone.

 

It's not a clear line. In California (where we both live) you cannot hold a phone to talk. You cannot text. You can hold your phone to use its gps. (People v Spriggs.). But if you are driving while distracted - whether it be from a handheld gpsr, cellphone, applying makeup, or reading the newspaper - you could be ticketed.

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Here in Minnesota you may not hold a GPS while driving. You may hold a phone only if you use it as a phone. You may not use the GPS on the smart phone. Due to the fact that it accesses the internet while in use.

You may not even put it on the dashboard, mounted due to the fact that it is still accessing the internet while being used as a GPS. You may however use a dash board mounted GPS such as TOM TOM. Many here have found the hard way when they got a large ticket for using the phone GPS.

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Here in Minnesota you may not hold a GPS while driving. You may hold a phone only if you use it as a phone. You may not use the GPS on the smart phone. Due to the fact that it accesses the internet while in use.

You may not even put it on the dashboard, mounted due to the fact that it is still accessing the internet while being used as a GPS. You may however use a dash board mounted GPS such as TOM TOM. Many here have found the hard way when they got a large ticket for using the phone GPS.

What if you put the phone in airplane mode, so it no longer accesses the internet while being used as a GPS? (My phone caches the route and continues to provide directions even when I lose my data connection, as long as I don't deviate too far from the route that it expects me to take.)

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Here in Minnesota you may not hold a GPS while driving. You may hold a phone only if you use it as a phone. You may not use the GPS on the smart phone. Due to the fact that it accesses the internet while in use.

You may not even put it on the dashboard, mounted due to the fact that it is still accessing the internet while being used as a GPS. You may however use a dash board mounted GPS such as TOM TOM. Many here have found the hard way when they got a large ticket for using the phone GPS.

 

lol that's ridiculous. we need more laws.

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I've never used an external GPS before, my unit does not have an input port for one. I've been tempted by an external bluetooth GPS for the phone as it would reduce phone battery consumption.

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Here in Minnesota you may not hold a GPS while driving. You may hold a phone only if you use it as a phone. You may not use the GPS on the smart phone. Due to the fact that it accesses the internet while in use.

You may not even put it on the dashboard, mounted due to the fact that it is still accessing the internet while being used as a GPS. You may however use a dash board mounted GPS such as TOM TOM. Many here have found the hard way when they got a large ticket for using the phone GPS.

What if you put the phone in airplane mode, so it no longer accesses the internet while being used as a GPS? (My phone caches the route and continues to provide directions even when I lose my data connection, as long as I don't deviate too far from the route that it expects me to take.)

Well good luck with the judge. The cop won't care what mode you claim to have it in. You still get the fine for using the smart phone/ hand held gps. Remember you may only use it as a phone in the car if you are the driver. You may however give it to the passenger and they become your

Navigator.

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I've never used an external GPS before, my unit does not have an input port for one. I've been tempted by an external bluetooth GPS for the phone as it would reduce phone battery consumption.

 

Bluetooth (ble also) needs more energy than just using the phones onboard antenna. gps uses very little energy at all, it's the cellular/wifi antennas and screen that consume the most.

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The caching app I use talks to me. In 300 meters turn right. (Does your caching app do this?) I leave the phone in the console, or in the in the shirt pocket.

 

Even where I live, I'm pretty sure it's still legal to listen to things. (Otherwise husbands and wives would have to travel separately.) Sorry dear, it's the law...

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The caching app I use talks to me. In 300 meters turn right. (Does your caching app do this?) I leave the phone in the console, or in the in the shirt pocket.

 

...

 

Oh, I must get an app that talks to me! Other hikers will be in awe of me! :ph34r::D

 

The trouble is, while finding an urban cache, just as I'm being stealthy crawling under a bench, everyone nearby will hear, "You have arrived at your destination."

:shocked:

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I want Geosphere to incorporate proximity beeps like handhelds. Useful for roadsides, or biking trails, so you don't have to keep checking the device to see how close you are.

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Locus has a continuous-beeping option, where it beeps faster and faster the closer you get to the cache. Like a hyperactive geiger counter.

 

I used that feature exactly once. :lol:

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The caching app I use talks to me. In 300 meters turn right. (Does your caching app do this?) I leave the phone in the console, or in the in the shirt pocket.

 

...

 

Oh, I must get an app that talks to me! Other hikers will be in awe of me! :ph34r::D

My GPSr does turn by turn navigation even on hiking trails, but it's just a "BEEP" when I should take a turn :D

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Locus has a continuous-beeping option, where it beeps faster and faster the closer you get to the cache. Like a hyperactive geiger counter.

 

I used that feature exactly once. :lol:

 

We use it every time. The kids live to hear the first beep, then they turn on their finding skills and just listen as we get closer. Lots of fun, wether it's really a gc or letter or open or other. :-)

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The caching app I use talks to me. In 300 meters turn right. (Does your caching app do this?) I leave the phone in the console, or in the in the shirt pocket.

 

...

 

Oh, I must get an app that talks to me! Other hikers will be in awe of me! :ph34r::D

My GPSr does turn by turn navigation even on hiking trails, but it's just a "BEEP" when I should take a turn :D

 

Are you allowing your "6th sense" to atrophy?? Will the device turn into a hyperactive geiger counter if a bear is stalking you?? :yikes:

:ph34r:

 

Also, why the industrial age "BEEP"? Why not a new age "OMMM"?!

 

The trouble is, while finding an urban cache, just as I'm being stealthy crawling under a bench, everyone nearby will hear, "BEEP," which I guess is better than "You have arrived at your destination."

:D

Edited by wmpastor

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The caching app I use talks to me. In 300 meters turn right. (Does your caching app do this?) I leave the phone in the console, or in the in the shirt pocket.

 

...

 

Oh, I must get an app that talks to me! Other hikers will be in awe of me! :ph34r::D

My GPSr does turn by turn navigation even on hiking trails, but it's just a "BEEP" when I should take a turn :D

 

Are you allowing your "6th sense" to atrophy?? Will the device turn into a hyperactive geiger counter if a bear is stalking you?? :yikes:

:ph34r:

 

Also, why the industrial age "BEEP"? Why not a new age "OMMM"?!

 

The trouble is, while finding an urban cache, just as I'm being stealthy crawling under a bench, everyone nearby will hear, "BEEP," which I guess is better than "You have arrived at your destination."

:D

 

It can be set to OMMMMMM or beep, or Neep, or whatever sound file you prefer or just vibrate for stealth. The beep is handy for when climbing or biking near danger (roads/ledges) is required , so instead of watching the screen I can just listen.

 

Yes, you could use turn by turn after building a route right to the cache, but that wouldn't be a whole lot of a challenge. I'm assuming though, cause I don't think I've done that yet.

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The caching app I use talks to me. In 300 meters turn right. (Does your caching app do this?) I leave the phone in the console, or in the in the shirt pocket.

 

...

 

Oh, I must get an app that talks to me! Other hikers will be in awe of me! :ph34r::D

My GPSr does turn by turn navigation even on hiking trails, but it's just a "BEEP" when I should take a turn :D

 

Are you allowing your "6th sense" to atrophy?? Will the device turn into a hyperactive geiger counter if a bear is stalking you?? :yikes:

:ph34r:

 

Also, why the industrial age "BEEP"? Why not a new age "OMMM"?!

 

The trouble is, while finding an urban cache, just as I'm being stealthy crawling under a bench, everyone nearby will hear, "BEEP," which I guess is better than "You have arrived at your destination."

:D

I've just tried it once and it worked well, but I quickly found out that I always have to take the hard way/steep path. A bear or wolf detector would be awesome though, they are very rarely seen around here. :)

I mostly ignore urban caches and just look at the maps/aerial images before I head out for one. I'm afraid that someone will call the bomb squad if I'm beeping under a bench. "You have arrived at your destination" will just make you look like a homeless person. :D

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So many interesting points. I use a GPS...new to geocaching. I bought an older model the Garmin Venture HC. It does not use the Gloss system. My sweetie uses a newer model and his is more accurate than mine by 5 to 10 ft. We have also used a smartphone but find that we don't have cell service in many, if not most of the areas we cache in. The one thing that comes in handy with the phone is: if we end up somewhere when we haven't planned on geocaching, or we feel we want to do more, we can look these up on the phone. But again, we have to be in an area where there is cell service. Overall, for us, the GPS is the way to go. I also used it when we were traveling out of the country, and it worked great. The diff. between the older GPS and the newer one has not made any substantial difference in finding the cache. Sometimes he finds it first, other times I do. In heavily forested areas, we always end up using our geocaching eyes to find GZ. I'm sure whatever folks use, its all about the adventure. And finally, we both got our GPS's on ebay, for very little money. Happy Caching!

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The caching app I use talks to me. In 300 meters turn right. (Does your caching app do this?) I leave the phone in the console, or in the in the shirt pocket.

 

...

 

Oh, I must get an app that talks to me! Other hikers will be in awe of me! :ph34r::D

My GPSr does turn by turn navigation even on hiking trails, but it's just a "BEEP" when I should take a turn :D

 

Are you allowing your "6th sense" to atrophy?? Will the device turn into a hyperactive geiger counter if a bear is stalking you?? :yikes:

:ph34r:

 

Also, why the industrial age "BEEP"? Why not a new age "OMMM"?!

 

The trouble is, while finding an urban cache, just as I'm being stealthy crawling under a bench, everyone nearby will hear, "BEEP," which I guess is better than "You have arrived at your destination."

:D

I've just tried it once and it worked well, but I quickly found out that I always have to take the hard way/steep path. A bear or wolf detector would be awesome though, they are very rarely seen around here. :)

I mostly ignore urban caches and just look at the maps/aerial images before I head out for one. I'm afraid that someone will call the bomb squad if I'm beeping under a bench. "You have arrived at your destination" will just make you look like a homeless person. :D

 

Buhahahaha I think you've pretty much nailed the right kind of attitude to have! :-)

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I don't feel the need to pay biggie whopper bucks for a data plan. My mobile phone is a phone, first and foremost - it's there for essential communication and emergencies (I was brought up in an era where making a phone call was not a casual thing) Running my battery down for fun is kinda foolish in my view. I go with pre-paid basic phone service and averaging under $10/month I couldn't be happier.

 

I can swap out NiMH AA cells at the drop of a hat in my handheld GPSr. I can also carry detailed TOPO maps, record trails and drop it on rocks without worrying the screen will fracture (again)

 

While out of range of cell towers I have no problems. I can swap MicroSD cards to bring in a new set of PQs when I'm on an extended trip, covering a large area.

 

It's pretty obvious, when I think about it, why it's such a good idea to use a dedicated device.

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To OP's question............

1. No data rates or limitations on handheld GPS

2. Coverage more dependable

3. Usually more accurate, particularly when phone signal is weak

4. Can cache and talk at same time

5 Features in a handheld your phone may not have

6. Conserves phone battery for emergency calls and solitaire game on the ride home.

7. The number one reason why carry a handheld along with a phone and other gear...........

When it's all over with, whoever has the most toys wins.

 

1- download beforehand, just like standalone.... standalone can't check for new caches in the field

2- exactly the same 'coverage', if you're talking about gps satellites... standalone has zero 'coverage' if you're talking about cellular coverage

3- completely wrong. see the differences between cellular triangulation vs gps triangulation... phones are more accurate

4- speakerphone... but this doesn't sound like fun to me.

5- suchas ?

6- bring batteries, no worries.

7- well, ok. :)

I bring both, GPS to load geocaches, find them and log them in field notes so I have time to write something longer then TFTC. More accurate judging by the cachers who log my caches. I can tell who is using a smartphone and who is using a GPS.

Only one time I lost reception with my GPS and that was in a tight canyon. I have been using rechargeable batteries lately.

My smartphone for checking for new caches, but my 64 can do that too. Phone a friend if I need to, solve a puzzle or confirm cords. Also use it for Wherigos.

Edited by jellis

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More accurate judging by the cachers who log my caches. I can tell who is using a smartphone and who is using a GPS.

You know, it really bugs me when people say this. What you actually mean is there's a good chance you can guess who is using what device based on either the log content or coordinate accuracy. That's it. Handheld users can be just as bad as the infamous "smartphone user", and plenty of smartphone users have much better generally appreciated caching etiquette than many handheld users.

 

There's no way you can "tell" who used what device when placing or logging a cache. There's no signature or device identifier with the listing or the log. You base your guess on a stereotype.

 

I like to repeat this little story often: I love when caching in a big group looking for a well-hidden forest cache, and I end up finding it; I may look out for a few seconds or a minute to see where everyone else is. Hearing people staring a their device (handheld or smartphone, but mostly the former) and calling out "5 meters over here!" "I've got 15 here!" "I zeroed out over here!" ... And I'm standing on the cache.

That situation has happened often since I started caching.

And oh man, log content - absolutely zero guarantee that a handheld user will post more interesting, useful, longer log text than a smartphone user. Yes, more "tftc" logs may be posted by app users, but IMO "tftc" is just as bad as multi-paragraph copy/paste logs describing an entire day or trip with no comments about the specific cache, often mass-logged with a desktop app. It goes both ways...

 

It does no one any good to associate specific devices or device classes with certain etiquette. Everyone needs to discover and learn what is great and appreciated for the general geocaching community.

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We try to go kayaking on a regular basis since it is our favorite means of transportation. Ever since dropping my iPhone in the water, I have kept it in a dry bag. That is why I find that having an accurate gpsr with great topo and street maps, an IP-68 waterproof rating, dust and shock resistance, a large battery capacity, and the ability to store multiple sets of caches that are fully paperless makes the most sense for me. It just happens to be a phone that is not connected to any data plan.

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We try to go kayaking on a regular basis since it is our favorite means of transportation. Ever since dropping my iPhone in the water, I have kept it in a dry bag. That is why I find that having an accurate gpsr with great topo and street maps, an IP-68 waterproof rating, dust and shock resistance, a large battery capacity, and the ability to store multiple sets of caches that are fully paperless makes the most sense for me. It just happens to be a phone that is not connected to any data plan.

 

Good mystery-story ending there!

 

Having recently cached in your area, I see the issue of signal-reception as more common than I realized. I guess you're saying that the phone's gpsr works okay even without data. And then an app can display the reading.

 

And having recently found one of your earth caches, I recommend padding in your bag to prevent damage from the device falling on a basalt seastack! Even the nearby melange poses a danger. And watch out for that San Andreas Fault, okay?

 

0e76ba61-4924-4caf-9198-dd160a5b94fd.jpg

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More accurate judging by the cachers who log my caches. I can tell who is using a smartphone and who is using a GPS.

You know, it really bugs me when people say this. What you actually mean is there's a good chance you can guess who is using what device based on either the log content or coordinate accuracy. That's it. Handheld users can be just as bad as the infamous "smartphone user", and plenty of smartphone users have much better generally appreciated caching etiquette than many handheld users.

 

There's no way you can "tell" who used what device when placing or logging a cache. There's no signature or device identifier with the listing or the log. You base your guess on a stereotype.

 

I like to repeat this little story often: I love when caching in a big group looking for a well-hidden forest cache, and I end up finding it; I may look out for a few seconds or a minute to see where everyone else is. Hearing people staring a their device (handheld or smartphone, but mostly the former) and calling out "5 meters over here!" "I've got 15 here!" "I zeroed out over here!" ... And I'm standing on the cache.

That situation has happened often since I started caching.

And oh man, log content - absolutely zero guarantee that a handheld user will post more interesting, useful, longer log text than a smartphone user. Yes, more "tftc" logs may be posted by app users, but IMO "tftc" is just as bad as multi-paragraph copy/paste logs describing an entire day or trip with no comments about the specific cache, often mass-logged with a desktop app. It goes both ways...

 

It does no one any good to associate specific devices or device classes with certain etiquette. Everyone needs to discover and learn what is great and appreciated for the general geocaching community.

Maybe or maybe not. But when they tell me my coords are off I am usually (not always) correct when they tell me what they used.

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