Jump to content

Logging an old archived cache


Ge0Patr0l
Followers 2

Recommended Posts

Question for the group on how others would handle this. We moved away from an area in July of 2015 and went through picking up and archiving our caches since we would no longer be close enough to maintain them. We recently had a very old backlogged find (Oct 2014) on one of those caches.

 

At this point the log book is gone so there's no evidence that it's a legitimate find, but I can't disprove it either. How would others handle it? Let it be? Delete the log?

 

Thanks in advance!

Link to comment

Question for the group on how others would handle this. We moved away from an area in July of 2015 and went through picking up and archiving our caches since we would no longer be close enough to maintain them. We recently had a very old backlogged find (Oct 2014) on one of those caches.

 

At this point the log book is gone so there's no evidence that it's a legitimate find, but I can't disprove it either. How would others handle it? Let it be? Delete the log?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

To me, if the container is still in place, the absence of the log sheet/logbook is the deciding factor here. No log, no find. If everything is still there, including the log book, I'd say it ought to stand. It's really your call, though. You could probably request the cache be locked so no further logs can be posted.

Link to comment

So the "Found it" log is dated in 2014, when the cache certainly was there? In which case it could be one of:

 

Someone who was part of a team now backloging their old finds to an individual account, or vice-versa.

Someone who is really behind in their logs, yes I've seen people who say they're over a year behind.

Someone who just realised they didn't log it at the time for some reason and is rectifying that.

Someone entered the wrong GC code and accidentally logged the wrong cache.

Someone who never found it but is deliberately logging it in order to get some statistic for a challenge or similar and reckoned that they'd get away with it on an old archived cache.

 

Take your pick, and whatever you decide to do about it is entirely up to you.

Why not contact them and ask why they did it?

Link to comment
At this point the log book is gone so there's no evidence that it's a legitimate find, but I can't disprove it either. How would others handle it? Let it be? Delete the log?

Reviewers treat every correspondence as true unless we know better (or have been previously burned). I think most cachers are honest and as a player, when I get logs like that, I accept them and move on.

 

Is there a reason to think they didn't find it in 2014?

 

Maybe there was a divorce (and separating of accounts), maybe a child got old enough that they wanted their own account, maybe they are that far behind in logging, etc. I can think of other reasons; lying because they need a single find on your archived cache isn't anywhere near the top of that list.

Edited by OReviewer
Link to comment

So the "Found it" log is dated in 2014, when the cache certainly was there? In which case it could be one of:

 

Someone who was part of a team now backloging their old finds to an individual account, or vice-versa.

Someone who is really behind in their logs, yes I've seen people who say they're over a year behind.

Someone who just realised they didn't log it at the time for some reason and is rectifying that.

Someone entered the wrong GC code and accidentally logged the wrong cache.

Someone who never found it but is deliberately logging it in order to get some statistic for a challenge or similar and reckoned that they'd get away with it on an old archived cache.

 

Take your pick, and whatever you decide to do about it is entirely up to you.

Why not contact them and ask why they did it?

+1

Most we received on our archived hides are folks who split from a team, starting their own account.

Link to comment

I would take a look at the cacher's profile just for peace of mind. If it's someone logging it dishonestly you'll probably be able to tell pretty quickly if you glance at their find history. If it's one of these spam accounts that finds caches in multiple countries on the same day or something, you'll see that.

 

Chances are it's just someone who is way behind, or someone who started a new account for some reason.

Link to comment

Sorry. I misunderstood. I was thinking you said they found the cache recently.

I've had a number of folks log caches of mine long after they found them. While I'll never really understand that mentality, it happens often enough.

Personally, I don't ever wait even until the next day. I think the longest I ever went before logging a find was maybe an hour or two.

Link to comment

My husband is easily two years behind on his logging right now. He's just very busy, but he takes pride in writing nice logs for every cache he finds, so they pile up. Every once in a while he has a logging sprint to try to catch up. I don't think he's ever had a log deleted because it was delayed, though you'll occasionally see some people on the forum express really heartless comments about late logging. Of course, the same people make equally heartless comments about TFTC logs. I just don't see this severity very often from actual cache owners.

Edited by narcissa
Link to comment

Is there a reason to think they didn't find it in 2014?

This is my question as well. I wouldn't think anything about a late log unless something seemed out of place. But even if something did look fishy, it'd be hard to be 100% sure of anything since you no longer have the logbook.

 

Having said that, you could take a look at the cacher's profile and stats to see how many caches he or she claimed on the day they said they found yours on. Not just how many, but also distances from each other on that day. If his stats showed something really far fetched, then you could maybe email for clarification or just go ahead and delete. If not, i'd give the cacher the benefit of the doubt and move on.

Edited by Mudfrog
Link to comment

Personally, I don't ever wait even until the next day. I think the longest I ever went before logging a find was maybe an hour or two.

 

+1

I take written notes on a pad while caching, then log online as soon as we are home, might have to wait until after kids are fed/washed though....

 

 

 

Link to comment

My husband is easily two years behind on his logging right now. He's just very busy, but he takes pride in writing nice logs for every cache he finds, so they pile up. Every once in a while he has a logging sprint to try to catch up. I don't think he's ever had a log deleted because it was delayed, though you'll occasionally see some people on the forum express really heartless comments about late logging. Of course, the same people make equally heartless comments about TFTC logs. I just don't see this severity very often from actual cache owners.

 

Well, nothing I said could be remotely interpreted as "heartless", so I hope you aren't referring to me. I merely said I didn't understand it. I still don't.

Link to comment

Personally, I don't ever wait even until the next day. I think the longest I ever went before logging a find was maybe an hour or two.

 

+1

I take written notes on a pad while caching, then log online as soon as we are home, might have to wait until after kids are fed/washed though....

 

 

 

 

I always try to log my experiences online the same day. It helps that I don't find more more caches than I can remember. The longest time from find to online log was 6 days, when I didn't have internet access or a cellular connection for a week.

 

I someone is so busy that they get a year or two behind in their logging I would wonder how they find time to go geocaching.

Link to comment

That one should be in the 'Found it, didn't find it' thread! What a gratuitous smiley grab......

 

Why is it gratuitous to log a cache that you found?

I think (s)he was referring to the immediately preceeding reply from on4bam re the find on this cache http://coord.info/GC1958 where the "finder" clearly didn't find it.

 

I didn't manage to edit my post in time to prevent someone from jumping on the error. Sometimes it is difficult to tell what people mean when they reply without quoting.

Link to comment
I someone is so busy that they get a year or two behind in their logging I would wonder how they find time to go geocaching.
Finding and logging are completely different activities, performed in completely different situations.

 

Finding is done in the field, with a mobile device, possibly during a few spare moments between other activities.

 

Logging is done at home, with a computer with a real keyboard, when I have time to review my field notes and write real online logs.

Link to comment
I someone is so busy that they get a year or two behind in their logging I would wonder how they find time to go geocaching.
Finding and logging are completely different activities, performed in completely different situations.

 

Finding is done in the field, with a mobile device, possibly during a few spare moments between other activities.

 

Logging is done at home, with a computer with a real keyboard, when I have time to review my field notes and write real online logs.

 

Not everyone does it like you. I've written lengthy logs from my phone while still standing at GZ or nearby. I've found that it's only worthwhile if the experience is still fresh. I'm actually more likely to write something dull and unenthusiastic if I wait. Also, I'm not interested in "taking notes" or anything like that. If I can't remember it, it wasn't memorable.

Link to comment

While the notion that a person might rather spend their limited time finding more geocaches instead of logging geocaches may be extraordinarily horrifying and confusing to some, the fact remains that many geocachers don't place a high priority on logging quickly (or logging at all).

 

Their finds are still legitimate. If there isn't an obvious reason to delete a log, don't delete the log. "Not logged within the arbitrary time limit I've decided is acceptable" is not an obvious reason to delete a log.

Link to comment

While the notion that a person might rather spend their limited time finding more geocaches instead of logging geocaches may be extraordinarily horrifying and confusing to some, the fact remains that many geocachers don't place a high priority on logging quickly (or logging at all).

 

How did you get from "I would wonder" to "extraordinarily horrifying and confusing to some"?

 

 

 

Link to comment

Question for the group on how others would handle this. We moved away from an area in July of 2015 and went through picking up and archiving our caches since we would no longer be close enough to maintain them. We recently had a very old backlogged find (Oct 2014) on one of those caches.

 

At this point the log book is gone so there's no evidence that it's a legitimate find, but I can't disprove it either. How would others handle it? Let it be? Delete the log?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Delete the log because it improves your chances of winning the game. ... Oh wait, there is no winner.

Link to comment

Did you simply ask the finder why they delayed logging it before starting a thread based on guessing and conjecture in the forums? :unsure:

That's would really wreck the drama. Much better to bring it here so we can generate some drama and hash it out for 30 pages.

Link to comment
I someone is so busy that they get a year or two behind in their logging I would wonder how they find time to go geocaching.
Finding and logging are completely different activities, performed in completely different situations.

 

Finding is done in the field, with a mobile device, possibly during a few spare moments between other activities.

 

Logging is done at home, with a computer with a real keyboard, when I have time to review my field notes and write real online logs.

 

Not everyone does it like you. I've written lengthy logs from my phone while still standing at GZ or nearby. I've found that it's only worthwhile if the experience is still fresh. I'm actually more likely to write something dull and unenthusiastic if I wait. Also, I'm not interested in "taking notes" or anything like that. If I can't remember it, it wasn't memorable.

I don't log from the field unless i made a ftf and knew i wouldn't be back home in short order. For the most part, i don't take notes because i know i'll get my logging done while my memory is still fresh. I may however, on those long days of caching, write notes for caches that were interesting, had something interesting happen at, or that needed maintenance. Suffice it to say, except for the NMs, i don't do much note taking.

Link to comment
I someone is so busy that they get a year or two behind in their logging I would wonder how they find time to go geocaching.
Finding and logging are completely different activities, performed in completely different situations.

 

Finding is done in the field, with a mobile device, possibly during a few spare moments between other activities.

 

Logging is done at home, with a computer with a real keyboard, when I have time to review my field notes and write real online logs.

 

Not everyone does it like you. I've written lengthy logs from my phone while still standing at GZ or nearby. I've found that it's only worthwhile if the experience is still fresh. I'm actually more likely to write something dull and unenthusiastic if I wait. Also, I'm not interested in "taking notes" or anything like that. If I can't remember it, it wasn't memorable.

I don't log from the field unless i made a ftf and knew i wouldn't be back home in short order. For the most part, i don't take notes because i know i'll get my logging done while my memory is still fresh. I may however, on those long days of caching, write notes for caches that were interesting, had something interesting happen at, or that needed maintenance. Suffice it to say, except for the NMs, i don't do much note taking.

 

I own five caches and I like to know when someone finds one of them relatively quickly. I might sound judgmental here, but it kind of seems a bit selfish to wait a long time to log a find. If I provided you with some entertainment finding my cache (even if it was just a few minutes) I think you should take the time to log your experience within a reasonable amount of time.

Link to comment

I own five caches and I like to know when someone finds one of them relatively quickly. I might sound judgmental here, but it kind of seems a bit selfish to wait a long time to log a find. If I provided you with some entertainment finding my cache (even if it was just a few minutes) I think you should take the time to log your experience within a reasonable amount of time.

 

So do you delete logs that are logged too late for your liking?

Link to comment

I own five caches and I like to know when someone finds one of them relatively quickly. I might sound judgmental here, but it kind of seems a bit selfish to wait a long time to log a find. If I provided you with some entertainment finding my cache (even if it was just a few minutes) I think you should take the time to log your experience within a reasonable amount of time.

 

So do you delete logs that are logged too late for your liking?

 

Haven't had it happen yet, but I wouldn't delete anything unless there was inappropriate language or spoilers in it. I also need to emphasize that I don't mean any disrespect by my comment, it's just my personal opinion on the matter.

Link to comment
I someone is so busy that they get a year or two behind in their logging I would wonder how they find time to go geocaching.
Finding and logging are completely different activities, performed in completely different situations.

 

Finding is done in the field, with a mobile device, possibly during a few spare moments between other activities.

 

Logging is done at home, with a computer with a real keyboard, when I have time to review my field notes and write real online logs.

 

Not everyone does it like you. I've written lengthy logs from my phone while still standing at GZ or nearby. I've found that it's only worthwhile if the experience is still fresh. I'm actually more likely to write something dull and unenthusiastic if I wait. Also, I'm not interested in "taking notes" or anything like that. If I can't remember it, it wasn't memorable.

I don't log from the field unless i made a ftf and knew i wouldn't be back home in short order. For the most part, i don't take notes because i know i'll get my logging done while my memory is still fresh. I may however, on those long days of caching, write notes for caches that were interesting, had something interesting happen at, or that needed maintenance. Suffice it to say, except for the NMs, i don't do much note taking.

 

I own five caches and I like to know when someone finds one of them relatively quickly. I might sound judgmental here, but it kind of seems a bit selfish to wait a long time to log a find. If I provided you with some entertainment finding my cache (even if it was just a few minutes) I think you should take the time to log your experience within a reasonable amount of time.

I hope that my statement above didn't give the wrong impression. Even though i rarely use my phone to log on the fly, i still try to log as soon as i can. Even after a long day of caching, i'll usually get on the computer when i get home to at least start the logging process. As far as going days, months, or even years before logging, i don't understand that.

Link to comment

I own five caches and I like to know when someone finds one of them relatively quickly. I might sound judgmental here, but it kind of seems a bit selfish to wait a long time to log a find. If I provided you with some entertainment finding my cache (even if it was just a few minutes) I think you should take the time to log your experience within a reasonable amount of time.

 

So do you delete logs that are logged too late for your liking?

 

Reading back through, I don't see any wording that would lead one to believe they would delete anything. Kind of an odd assumption to make.

I don't really care whether someone logs my cache immediately or after a week...but honestly, I can't really understand why it might take months or years to post a log. If it really means so much to get the wording perfect in a 1000 word essay, maybe a short "found it, more later" type of log would be in order to at least let other folks know when it was found. I won't throw out words like "inconsiderate" or "selfish" since I don't really agree with such usage in this context...I do think it can be helpful and informative to at least indicate a day that it was found to others who may want to look for it, especially for the "lonelier" caches that do not get a lot of traffic.

Link to comment

I own five caches and I like to know when someone finds one of them relatively quickly. I might sound judgmental here, but it kind of seems a bit selfish to wait a long time to log a find. If I provided you with some entertainment finding my cache (even if it was just a few minutes) I think you should take the time to log your experience within a reasonable amount of time.

 

So do you delete logs that are logged too late for your liking?

 

Haven't had it happen yet, but I wouldn't delete anything unless there was inappropriate language or spoilers in it. I also need to emphasize that I don't mean any disrespect by my comment, it's just my personal opinion on the matter.

 

Would you prefer nothing but "TFTC" immediately, or a detailed log later?

Link to comment
If I provided you with some entertainment finding my cache (even if it was just a few minutes) I think you should take the time to log your experience within a reasonable amount of time.

I can kinda agree to that, if you can define a 'reasonable' amount of time that even twenty folks could agree with. :laughing:

Link to comment

I own five caches and I like to know when someone finds one of them relatively quickly. I might sound judgmental here, but it kind of seems a bit selfish to wait a long time to log a find. If I provided you with some entertainment finding my cache (even if it was just a few minutes) I think you should take the time to log your experience within a reasonable amount of time.

 

So do you delete logs that are logged too late for your liking?

 

Haven't had it happen yet, but I wouldn't delete anything unless there was inappropriate language or spoilers in it. I also need to emphasize that I don't mean any disrespect by my comment, it's just my personal opinion on the matter.

 

Would you prefer nothing but "TFTC" immediately, or a detailed log later?

 

By "reasonable amount of time" I mean within a couple of days.

Link to comment
If I provided you with some entertainment finding my cache (even if it was just a few minutes) I think you should take the time to log your experience within a reasonable amount of time.

I can kinda agree to that, if you can define a 'reasonable' amount of time that even twenty folks could agree with. :laughing:

 

I think any reasonable cache owner would agree that it's nice to get logs so that we know our caches are okay, but "TFTC" from the field doesn't tell me anything. I can't even trust that someone really found the cache with that.

 

I don't see any need to attach mean-spirited adjectives to fellow geocachers who get busy and can't log within some arbitrary time frame.

 

At the end of the day, I'm just pleased when I receive sincere logs from geocachers who enjoyed the cache, whether those logs are immediate or back-dated.

Link to comment

I own five caches and I like to know when someone finds one of them relatively quickly. I might sound judgmental here, but it kind of seems a bit selfish to wait a long time to log a find. If I provided you with some entertainment finding my cache (even if it was just a few minutes) I think you should take the time to log your experience within a reasonable amount of time.

 

So do you delete logs that are logged too late for your liking?

 

Haven't had it happen yet, but I wouldn't delete anything unless there was inappropriate language or spoilers in it. I also need to emphasize that I don't mean any disrespect by my comment, it's just my personal opinion on the matter.

 

Would you prefer nothing but "TFTC" immediately, or a detailed log later?

 

By "reasonable amount of time" I mean within a couple of days.

 

By this arbitrary standard, a geocacher who is on vacation for two weeks is, in your words, "selfish" for not logging until she gets home.

Link to comment
If I provided you with some entertainment finding my cache (even if it was just a few minutes) I think you should take the time to log your experience within a reasonable amount of time.

I can kinda agree to that, if you can define a 'reasonable' amount of time that even twenty folks could agree with. :laughing:

 

I think any reasonable cache owner would agree that it's nice to get logs so that we know our caches are okay, but "TFTC" from the field doesn't tell me anything. I can't even trust that someone really found the cache with that.

 

I don't see any need to attach mean-spirited adjectives to fellow geocachers who get busy and can't log within some arbitrary time frame.

 

At the end of the day, I'm just pleased when I receive sincere logs from geocachers who enjoyed the cache, whether those logs are immediate or back-dated.

 

Fair enough. But it's my simple, PERSONAL belief that waiting two years to log a find is a bit strange. As a cache owner I would question why it took so long to log it. It's just me. I always make sure to log a find the same day. If not, by the next day at latest.

Link to comment
If I provided you with some entertainment finding my cache (even if it was just a few minutes) I think you should take the time to log your experience within a reasonable amount of time.

I can kinda agree to that, if you can define a 'reasonable' amount of time that even twenty folks could agree with. :laughing:

 

I think any reasonable cache owner would agree that it's nice to get logs so that we know our caches are okay, but "TFTC" from the field doesn't tell me anything. I can't even trust that someone really found the cache with that.

 

I don't see any need to attach mean-spirited adjectives to fellow geocachers who get busy and can't log within some arbitrary time frame.

 

At the end of the day, I'm just pleased when I receive sincere logs from geocachers who enjoyed the cache, whether those logs are immediate or back-dated.

 

Fair enough. But it's my simple, PERSONAL belief that waiting two years to log a find is a bit strange. As a cache owner I would question why it took so long to log it. It's just me. I always make sure to log a find the same day. If not, by the next day at latest.

 

There is no harm in checking on a log that seems strange for any reason. There is harm in attaching harsh labels to fellow geocachers.

Link to comment

 

I don't see any need to attach mean-spirited adjectives to fellow geocachers who get busy and can't log within some arbitrary time frame.

 

 

I haven't seen anything even remotely 'mean-spirited' in here?

There is a saying here (maybe elsewhere) - 'if you want a job done, give it to a busy person....'

 

 

Link to comment

 

Fair enough. But it's my simple, PERSONAL belief that waiting two years to log a find is a bit strange. As a cache owner I would question why it took so long to log it. It's just me. I always make sure to log a find the same day. If not, by the next day at latest.

 

It isn't just your personal belief, I would say it would be the general consensus.....

 

 

Link to comment

 

Fair enough. But it's my simple, PERSONAL belief that waiting two years to log a find is a bit strange. As a cache owner I would question why it took so long to log it. It's just me. I always make sure to log a find the same day. If not, by the next day at latest.

 

It isn't just your personal belief, I would say it would be the general consensus.....

 

It is unusual, in that most geocachers don't take that long to log. I don't think anyone disagrees about this basic fact, and it is easy enough to glance at someone's profile to make a decision about the legitimacy of a log that seems unusual.

 

I certainly hope it isn't "consensus" to attach value-laden adjectives like "selfish" to someone who didn't log within an arbitrary time frame. I'd like to think better of this community than that.

Edited by narcissa
Link to comment

Fair enough. But it's my simple, PERSONAL belief that waiting two years to log a find is a bit strange. As a cache owner I would question why it took so long to log it. It's just me. I always make sure to log a find the same day. If not, by the next day at latest.

It isn't just your personal belief, I would say it would be the general consensus.....

If that's the consensus, then I guess I'm not part of the consensus. While I might find it a bit odd to receive a log several years late, I wouldn't even consider questioning the reason behind it unless the log text gave me some reason to think the log may not be valid. Frankly, it simply doesn't matter.

 

My views on this are the same as narcissa: "At the end of the day, I'm just pleased when I receive sincere logs from geocachers who enjoyed the cache, whether those logs are immediate or back-dated."

Link to comment

Fair enough. But it's my simple, PERSONAL belief that waiting two years to log a find is a bit strange. As a cache owner I would question why it took so long to log it. It's just me. I always make sure to log a find the same day. If not, by the next day at latest.

It isn't just your personal belief, I would say it would be the general consensus.....

If that's the consensus, then I guess I'm not part of the consensus. While I might find it a bit odd to receive a log several years late, I wouldn't even consider questioning the reason behind it unless the log text gave me some reason to think the log may not be valid. Frankly, it simply doesn't matter.

 

My views on this are the same as narcissa: "At the end of the day, I'm just pleased when I receive sincere logs from geocachers who enjoyed the cache, whether those logs are immediate or back-dated."

 

But if you enjoyed a find, wouldn't you want the CO to know that you enjoyed it soon after you found it? Positive logs will draw more people to the cache which is a good thing. If someone logged a find for one of my hides two years after the fact I'd question in my head why it took you over 700 days to log it. I think if you find someone's cache (even if it's less than stellar) it's common geocaching courtesy to log it within a reasonable amount of time...I also think that if you sign the physical log, an online log shouldn't be too far behind.

Edited by SicilianCyclops
Link to comment

While I might find it a bit odd to receive a log several years late, I wouldn't even consider questioning the reason behind it unless the log text gave me some reason to think the log may not be valid. Frankly, it simply doesn't matter.

 

My views on this are the same as narcissa: "At the end of the day, I'm just pleased when I receive sincere logs from geocachers who enjoyed the cache, whether those logs are immediate or back-dated."

But if you enjoyed a find, wouldn't you want the CO to know that you enjoyed it soon after you found it? Positive logs will draw more people to the cache which is a good thing. If someone logged a find for one of my hides two years after the fact I'd question in my head why it took you over 700 days to log it.

For the record, as a finder, I try to log soon after making the find. This usually means later on the same day, and sometimes a day or two later. On rare occasions like when I've been traveling, there could be a delay of a couple of weeks. I really can't say why I try to log so soon after. It's just the way I've always done it.

 

Looking at it as a CO, if a finder enjoyed my cache, it doesn't matter to me when they enjoyed it, as long as they did.

 

If some of you find the few cachers logging years late to be odd and/or selfish, I have to wonder why your head hasn't exploded with all the cachers who never log online. There are far more of those.

Link to comment
If some of you find the few cachers logging years late to be odd and/or selfish, I have to wonder why your head hasn't exploded with all the cachers who never log online. There are far more of those.

:laughing: +1

Since we started, there's been a handful that signed the physical log, but rarely (if ever) logged online.

- But we're seeing a few more now who's names come up on, "Find Another Player" (so not muggles...), out on distance hides with higher terrain.

By the logs, these folks repair caches, and sometimes even leave swag, but just don't wanna log in online anymore I guess.

Link to comment

But if you enjoyed a find, wouldn't you want the CO to know that you enjoyed it soon after you found it? Positive logs will draw more people to the cache which is a good thing. If someone logged a find for one of my hides two years after the fact I'd question in my head why it took you over 700 days to log it. I think if you find someone's cache (even if it's less than stellar) it's common geocaching courtesy to log it within a reasonable amount of time...I also think that if you sign the physical log, an online log shouldn't be too far behind.

 

Oh, there's that "courtesy" word that gets trotted out every time this comes up.

 

Any good geocacher *wants* to be helpful and "courteous" to other geocachers.

 

Sometimes life gets busy and people fall behind on things.

 

You just never know when the shoe will on the other foot and you might be grateful that other geocachers were willing to cut you a break instead of saying awful things about you.

 

A back-dated log *is* unusual. Questioning that is fine. Look at the person's profile and see if you can get a sense of what's happening. It will probably be easy to tell if this fellow geocacher is just behind on logging or starting a new account, or if they're one of these spam people writing fake logs.

 

There's no need to attach harsh judgment beyond that. Investigate, make a decision move on. We all have different lives.

Link to comment

But if you enjoyed a find, wouldn't you want the CO to know that you enjoyed it soon after you found it? Positive logs will draw more people to the cache which is a good thing. If someone logged a find for one of my hides two years after the fact I'd question in my head why it took you over 700 days to log it. I think if you find someone's cache (even if it's less than stellar) it's common geocaching courtesy to log it within a reasonable amount of time...I also think that if you sign the physical log, an online log shouldn't be too far behind.

 

Oh, there's that "courtesy" word that gets trotted out every time this comes up.

 

Any good geocacher *wants* to be helpful and "courteous" to other geocachers.

 

Sometimes life gets busy and people fall behind on things.

 

You just never know when the shoe will on the other foot and you might be grateful that other geocachers were willing to cut you a break instead of saying awful things about you.

 

A back-dated log *is* unusual. Questioning that is fine. Look at the person's profile and see if you can get a sense of what's happening. It will probably be easy to tell if this fellow geocacher is just behind on logging or starting a new account, or if they're one of these spam people writing fake logs.

 

There's no need to attach harsh judgment beyond that. Investigate, make a decision move on. We all have different lives.

 

I stated a number of posts back that I didn't mean any disrespect, and I apologize if I did; it was a simple opinion not a "harsh judgment" as you keep saying. I stand by my belief that it's common courtesy in the geocaching world to log a find within a reasonable amount of time (I think within a month is a reasonable amount of time). If you take the time to find someone's cache, you should take the time to log it in a timely manner. If I ever found myself in a situation where I couldn't log caches for two years, I just wouldn't continue with the hobby.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 2
×
×
  • Create New...