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Quantification spoils the fun of geocaching?


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A newly-published study byProfessor Jordan Etkin of Duke University's Fuqua School of Business implies that geocaching's focus on measuring all kinds of statistics could, counterintuitively, be reducing participation.

 

The key finding is that when you try to measure an activity, in an effort to optimize and increase your participation, the focus on the measurement decreases enjoyment and precipitates the exact opposite of the intended outcome, namely reduced participation. The study focuses on devices like Fitbit, aimed at measuring physical activity with the aim of encouraging exercise, but found that these devices actually reduce participation. Despite the focus on exercise, the author says the conclusion is equally applicable to other ostensibly enjoyable activities. They don't mention geocaching, but frankly, I don't know of any other enjoyable activity that more strongly encourages the quantification of every imaginable aspect (baseball may be a contender).

 

Here's a link to the article on Duke's web site, and a link to a summary on USAToday.

 

Among long-time geocachers, I've observed a high incidence of an "I'm not in it for the numbers" attitude, and wonder now if this phenomenon is explained.

 

I'm not a truly long-time geocacher, having only been at this for just over 3 years, but while I agree that the appeal of the destination is a stronger motivation than the statistics, I have also been motivated to find caches I otherwise would not have pursued, or would have left for later, in order to satisfy a statistical objective. Another thing to consider is that geocaching does seem to attract interest more strongly among that part of the population that is just a little "nerdier", for lack of a better term, than average. So for many, a statistical approach seems like a natural fit. Is it possible that a natural affinity for numerical analysis could actually ADD enjoyment, thus exempting geocaching from the conclusions of the study, or does the focus on statistics counterintuitively discourage the very activity it seeks to encourage?

 

 

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A pity the study isn't a long term one, because it would be more interesting to see what happens after, for instance, 6 months.

 

The fun with a fitbit or with geocaching is to explore something new, first it might be interesting to have as many steps/caches as possible within a certain time frame, because you have never done it before. But as soon as it gets common enough for someone it wil get boring and the focus will shift. Then it might be more interesting to compare steps/heartrates/finds/logs with others and share this information. Then this gets common and something else takes over.

 

I remember in the first year we really wanted to have a FTF. It took a while (weren't even premium member) but eventually we managed a FTF, a very special moment. And a few more FTFs followed and after about 5 FTFs we didn't care about them anymore, the new (=exciting) part of this game element was gone. Now we still enjoy a FTF in another country, because that is still new, since every country has his own styles on hiding, caching communities are different, some with more FTF-hunters, some with none.

A few years ago we thought it might be fun to try to find 50 or 100 (don't even remember anymore) on one day. After 15 boring finds, we had enough of getting in and out of the car, just signing logs, so that was not for us, but others really enjoy this.

 

A lot of things are interesting to me, something new to explore, to try, to experience. But to know if it's really fun for the long term, I'll have to try and see. People have a lot of interests like sports, hobbies, collections etc. After a certain amount of time something else might be more fun/interesting/new to do and then people change how they spend their free time. With geocaching you can play the game in a lot of ways, if you are aware of this variety you can play the game for many years because there are different ways to play it and keep having fun: going for a FTF, if this gets boring: going for a certain amount per..., if this gets boring: going for caches with a lot of favorites, if this gets boring: going for all the oldest caches, if this gets boring: let the goal of a trackable decide where to go, if this gets boring: go to events to just chat, if this gets boring: make caches instead of finding them, if this gets boring: etc etc. etc.

 

The amount of variety a fitbit can offer is less than what geocaching can offer and I think variety is the key to have fun on a long term.

Edited by irisisleuk
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The key finding is that when you try to measure an activity, in an effort to optimize and increase your participation, the focus on the measurement decreases enjoyment and precipitates the exact opposite of the intended outcome, namely reduced participation.

 

Interesting article. I haven't found this to be true at all for my participation in this game and I have been keeping track of our stats since day one. I view the stats to be a measure of our fun and experience and not primarily as a comparison to others.

 

We started in November 2001 and find 500 to 800 caches per year and the pace has been steady for these 14 years. Power trail caching has been about 2% of our total and at least half of those have been on foot or bike.

 

I created a spread sheet in early 2002 that I have kept continually maintained. In this spreadsheet I track finds by month, year and running total; finds by state; century marks; two categories of dnfs: cache in place and cache missing; Locationless caches; benchmarks; high find-count days, and more.

 

On our profile page I post nearly up-to-date maps that show the number of finds per county in our primary caching states. The counties are colored coded for number of caches found and a side goal is to get each county to the next color.

 

The page also has a map of the US by county showing where we have cached and the side goal here is to color in new counties.

 

We had a counter at the top of our profile page that showed dnfs where cache was in place but that recently fell blank with changes to cache page formatting. I will try to get that back.

 

Through the years we have focused on and completed six state DeLorme Challenges and the County Challenges for those states.

 

And... I still enjoy the game!

 

And, I have not noticed any decline in the enjoyment of tracking our stats. But the numbers are only part of the fun. Preparing for cache trips, driving to the caches, "the hunt" - found or dnf, and logging caches online are equally fun. During logging online I usually read the pages and some past logs and then write a unique log for each cache, even for a 100 cache find day.

 

I have met many cachers over the years that eventually dropped out of the game or took it way back to minimal levels but I don't know if quantifying their caching contributed to the loss of interest.

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The key finding is that when you try to measure an activity, in an effort to optimize and increase your participation, the focus on the measurement decreases enjoyment and precipitates the exact opposite of the intended outcome, namely reduced participation.

 

Interesting article. I haven't found this to be true at all for my participation in this game and I have been keeping track of our stats since day one. I view the stats to be a measure of our fun and experience and not primarily as a comparison to others.

 

We started in November 2001 and find 500 to 800 caches per year and the pace has been steady for these 14 years. Power trail caching has been about 2% of our total and at least half of those have been on foot or bike.

 

I created a spread sheet in early 2002 that I have kept continually maintained. In this spreadsheet I track finds by month, year and running total; finds by state; century marks; two categories of dnfs: cache in place and cache missing; Locationless caches; benchmarks; high find-count days, and more.

 

On our profile page I post nearly up-to-date maps that show the number of finds per county in our primary caching states. The counties are colored coded for number of caches found and a side goal is to get each county to the next color.

 

The page also has a map of the US by county showing where we have cached and the side goal here is to color in new counties.

 

We had a counter at the top of our profile page that showed dnfs where cache was in place but that recently fell blank with changes to cache page formatting. I will try to get that back.

 

Through the years we have focused on and completed six state DeLorme Challenges and the County Challenges for those states.

 

And... I still enjoy the game!

 

And, I have not noticed any decline in the enjoyment of tracking our stats. But the numbers are only part of the fun. Preparing for cache trips, driving to the caches, "the hunt" - found or dnf, and logging caches online are equally fun. During logging online I usually read the pages and some past logs and then write a unique log for each cache, even for a 100 cache find day.

 

I have met many cachers over the years that eventually dropped out of the game or took it way back to minimal levels but I don't know if quantifying their caching contributed to the loss of interest.

 

I keeps statistics, not quite as detailed as Team Sagefox, and a lot of my geocaching is geared towards completing self-imposed goals. How and when I go geocaching is based on trying to complete those goals. I am usually working on multiple goals simultaneously, so the fact that I have completed Jan-mid Aug on my goal of filling out the 365/366 grid does not dramatically affect caching in those months. (On the other hand, snow does.) I did complete my Jasmer goal last August, but I have since added a Circle 360 goal. I also have several GeoTours as goals. And, filling in the D/T matrix is a goal, but health may prohibit me from completing that one.

 

When I started, I would go after any cache. Now, I limit what I go after, because I don't get enjoyment out of LPC's, and caches placed by certain CO's.

 

So, for me, any perceived reduced participation in my level of caching is not directly because of keeping statistics, but would be more based on a lack of interesting goals.

 

Skye.

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With FitBit you're trying to track your daily exercise. But that means you become very aware of when you fall short of your goal. If FitBit is essentially telling you of your daily failure then you are motivated to either work harder, change your goals, or quit trying. I think the study is saying people get FitBit find that reaching their goal is too hard and quit trying; without FitBit to give them statistics they would not have been aware of their shortcomings.

 

In geocaching are number hounds prone to quiting geocaching entirely if they frequently fail to get the FTFs they seek or the Find rate they want or maintain a streak? Meanwhile those who cache when they want seeking what they want stick around longer?

Edited by Joshism
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When my wife and I started geocaching in 2005, it was a way for her to agree to go off-roading in my Jeep. At first, we pretty much ignored the stats we kept. We were in it for the novelty, and even more so, for the places the game took us. Places where we would not have visited were it not for geocaching. There was also a social aspect to it. Finally, in the last two years or so, we have completed nearly all of the typical matrices one sees on a profile page. (We only lack in finding a few of the oldest geocaches around.) It was nice to see those grids filled. Now, we are mostly going after caches because a) we are in the area, or B) the caches sound interesting. I also have to admit to some power trails. On January 1, the two of us found 366 caches...a cache a day for the year, so to speak. It was a long day, but an interesting one on old Route 66!

 

The stats have their attraction, no doubt. And I am nerdy enough to keep all sorts of odd stats, too. For instance, my D/T ratings of my FTFs (which is much higher than my overall D/T rating). But then. I do love baseball!

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We found our first 6 caches 12/26/2003. Our kids were 10 and 7. This created a great potential opportunity for us to share a family experience. It worked for a few years and all 4 of our family members still cache to some extent. Our find count has declined in recent years since our kids grew up and moved away. I still am on the forums every day and am certainly emotionally invested in the game. Still a premium member. In our early years I took pride in and worked hard to maintain our find count among the top 100 in Washington State. As power trails and the popularity of the game grew, I found our team was not able to "keep up" so I/we changed our focus and we now find caches when we can and we still enjoy the game very much. Our stats are just that. One of these years we may finally complete a challenge to find a cache every day of the year. Not in a single year, but over time. Not too many days left, but January has two days that we didn't make a point of, or try to "check off" this year just to satisfy some list.

 

In the early days there were many cachers who adamantly claimed that anyone and everyone who was finding caches MUST hide at least one cache for every 10 found. Thankfully this debate has quietly receded into our glorious history. Perhaps a professor can find a way to quantify what people find to be engaging in geocaching. The reasons to start and the reasons to stop are as entertaining as the reasons to keep playing. I choose to keep playing regardless of the stats.

 

 

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:lol: Howdy WRASTRO!! It's been awhile, great to know you're not caught up in the insecurities of some PowerPoint Chart builder.

 

OOPs! Back on track of the subject at hand.

 

Some folks live for Stats/Numbers and various other reasons. No one is holding a GPS to anyones head and saying you must go find a Cache right this minute, only you can make that decision.

 

It's only a game that each of you plays your own way. As I play it my way.

 

Walk, ride, hike or climbing out doors is fantastic instead of sitting staring out a window. You can call it exercise or maybe grabbing some fresh air, each to his own. Even just sitting on a bench watching to Sun rise or set is great. ( Oh, by the way I hear there;s a cache located under that bench.. HaHa :lol: ) Gotcha!

 

So in short don't listen or read about Geocaching just do what you want or like to do. Enjoy the outdoors, there is some amazing places out there. Go find them, if there happens to be a Cache nearby, OK, if not, OK.

 

Let step down off this soap box and venture over to that lamp skirt. :anibad:

 

Go have some fun, maybe go fishing with your mind. B)

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I don't see statistics as being a detriment to participation in geocaching. In fact I see people going out of their way to fulfill all sorts of grids (Fizzy, 366 day, DeLorme challenges, etc.), accumulate icons and souvineers, keep streaks going,etc. All you need to do is to follow a few Facebook geocaching pages to see the obsession that many have over achieving certain statistical levels.

 

Statistics appear to be the focus of many, if not most geocachers, their raison d'être. Reaching a certain arbitrary number of finds, number of finds in a year, "clearing" all unfound caches with X miles of home. Some discuss raising their D/T average over 2. Numbers and goals are the most common topic of discussion in the Facebook world.

 

With the current snow storm in the northeast, the chief topic I saw on most Facebook pages was how to keep streaks alive under the conditions. Go to a major event and you will find countless cachers who are more into using the event as an opportunity to fulfill some arbitrary statistical goal, rather than socializing.

 

I'm a long time geocacher who is truly not into numbers at all. I haven't seen my souvenir page in a year or more. I have no idea what my "Fizzy grid" or "366 day grid" looks like. I do know what my D/T average is because someone asked in a FB forum, but it's not important to me. I find that I'm more of an outlier in this respect. I believe that statistics are a huge incentive for continued participation in the sport for many.

Edited by briansnat
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I would imagine the percentage of cachers who do it simply for the enjoyment of the finds - never looking at any stats, grids or maps - is pretty small.

 

I've obsessed over different stats (total finds - stretch - the various grids - maps) at different times. Currently it's mystery caches within 15 miles of home (157 down 66 to go) and a 2nd loop of the date found grid (I can relax until 29 Feb and then 2 April!) - next year it'll no doubt be something else. Maybe there will be some new challenge caches to go for by then?!?!?

 

Because the total finds number is not terribly exciting at the moment (I'm in the mid 2000s), this weekend's 2 walks (2 miles 2 caches, derelict 200-year-old canal lock in the middle of a field; 2 miles 10 caches, nice viewpoint above the Thames and yes 2 mystery caches ticked off) felt equally fulfilling.

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1390142517866241/?fref=ts a recent discovery for people who like all the stats!

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I still have a lot to read before I can comment even reasonably intelligent on the real subject matter here, but I immediately picked up on this: "I've observed a high incidence of an "I'm not in it for the numbers" attitude, and wonder now if this phenomenon is explained." and had to ask, why does it need an explanation at all? VERY few geocachers, I suspect, got involved in geocaching as a game of scores. Rather, we got swept up in it as we got to know other cachers.

 

In other words, I'd suggest that NOT comparing counts with other cachers is the natural way of things. Competing in this game is a learned behavior.

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Some people are very goal-oriented. I think that our society encourages that, considering all the annual reviews that I had when I was working that always had a question of "What are your goals for the next year?" somewhere in it. I have never been goal oriented. That implies planning, and I am a very spontaneous person. My goal is pretty much to do what I want to do.

 

Now, as to keeping score and its effect on your fun & pleasure, imagine you were keeping score on how many times you and your spouse made love. Imagine that you actually had a webpage that showed those statistics (forget about the rest of the world being able to see them). Is your satisfaction really based upon the score on that web page? If it is, I would suggest that something may be seriously wrong with your love life. Is that an unfair comparison to geocaching?

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Sex life is a much more private subject that batting average or Find count.

 

I think there is a distinction to be made between numbers cachers and statistics cachers. Mind you I think the two circles fo overlap on a Venn diagram.

 

Numbers cachers are looking for more and more where the only real criteria is quantity. They may be competing with friends or even strangers.

 

Statistics cachers want to fill grids, meet challenges, etc. This is often more goal oriented (as noted by a previous poster) rather than competitive. Some folks are just real interested in numbers - not their accumulation but the crunching of the data.

 

I skip GRIM power trails, but filling my DT and Calendar grids are important to me.

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Is that an unfair comparison to geocaching?

 

I think, ahh, yes. One of these activities is typically not a social game... B)

To some, it is.

 

But I deliberately put the part in parenthesis about the fictional web page not being public. Let's just change that to a journal or diary... better analogy The point is that you do it for love (or other motives) and not generally for the number of times you do it.

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I suspect the difference between the quantification provided by Fitbit and other exercise apps, and by the assorted stats modules for geocaching is that there is a sort of moral imperative about getting X amount of exercise per unit of time (thou shalt... weekly or daily).

When that's quantified and reported back to you, you get to see yourself fail.

 

Whereas few conflate their geocaching stats with any "moral" purpose. It's fun to try to succeed at X goal, and if not.... oh well.

 

Maintaining streaks seems create the greatest pressure, because of the relentless daily pressure of it - but people understand that their find streak is going to end at some point.

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I don't see statistics as being a detriment to participation in geocaching. In fact I see people going out of their way to fulfill all sorts of grids (Fizzy, 366 day, DeLorme challenges, etc.), accumulate icons and souvineers, keep streaks going,etc. All you need to do is to follow a few Facebook geocaching pages to see the obsession that many have over achieving certain statistical levels.

 

Statistics appear to be the focus of many, if not most geocachers, their raison d'être. Reaching a certain arbitrary number of finds, number of finds in a year, "clearing" all unfound caches with X miles of home. Some discuss raising their D/T average over 2. Numbers and goals are the most common topic of discussion in the Facebook world.

 

With the current snow storm in the northeast, the chief topic I saw on most Facebook pages was how to keep streaks alive under the conditions. Go to a major event and you will find countless cachers who are more into using the event as an opportunity to fulfill some arbitrary statistical goal, rather than socializing.

 

I'm a long time geocacher who is truly not into numbers at all. I haven't seen my souvenir page in a year or more. I have no idea what my "Fizzy grid" or "366 day grid" looks like. I do know what my D/T average is because someone asked in a FB forum, but it's not important to me. I find that I'm more of an outlier in this respect. I believe that statistics are a huge incentive for continued participation in the sport for many.

 

I wonder how regional this sort of thing is. Even though I know high numbers/statistics cachers, I don't think I've ever been asked in 14 years how many caches I've found. The events I go to are all about the socialization, and people stick around and enjoy talking to each other for hours.

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The events I go to are all about the socialization, and people stick around and enjoy talking to each other for hours.

 

Then I guess that you do not go to those events that exist due to a special souvenir. It's crazy meanwhile what is happening. In some areas every village needs its own 29/02 event. I for a while consider to attend one of two 29/02 events in my city (it was by far the first 29/02 event published in my area and the background idea is more creative than for the mass of the 29/02 which are only about souvenir collecting) because the organizer asked me to join and as it is not a drive in event, but I do not want to be part of this crazyness. There is absolutely nothing special about 29/02 and it's a Monday - a day when in my area normally no events take place at all. Now every week new events pop up. The same would happen if another souvenir were available say for March 1 regardless of whether the people already met on February 29. Rather attend two short events to collect two souvenirs than staying longer at one.

 

By the way: I have asked for my find count several times over the years and I know many cachers who think that before having found 1000 caches, one is not a serious cacher.

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The events I go to are all about the socialization, and people stick around and enjoy talking to each other for hours.

 

Then I guess that you do not go to those events that exist due to a special souvenir. It's crazy meanwhile what is happening. In some areas every village needs its own 29/02 event. I for a while consider to attend one of two 29/02 events in my city (it was by far the first 29/02 event published in my area and the background idea is more creative than for the mass of the 29/02 which are only about souvenir collecting) because the organizer asked me to join and as it is not a drive in event, but I do not want to be part of this crazyness. There is absolutely nothing special about 29/02 and it's a Monday - a day when in my area normally no events take place at all. Now every week new events pop up. The same would happen if another souvenir were available say for March 1 regardless of whether the people already met on February 29. Rather attend two short events to collect two souvenirs than staying longer at one.

 

By the way: I have asked for my find count several times over the years and I know many cachers who think that before having found 1000 caches, one is not a serious cacher.

 

We have some people who are interested in souvenirs, including me. Enough that we always have an event if it's one needed for a new souvenir. I've hosted a few myself. But the key is that our local group really enjoys events and getting together, so any excuse to hold an event is welcomed. If it happens to be for a souvenir, all the better. But it's not the focus. The community is the focus.

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Interesting article.

 

Quote from the article: "Enjoyable activities can became almost like a job, by focusing on the outcomes of things that used to be fun."

 

The Fitbit example I can understand, but I don't think Geocaching is similar. E.g. someone who walks for an hour every day, and feels good about doing that, and enjoy it. Then they get a Fitbit which tells them a number of steps which is regarded as "not good enough". The person can react by walking more (and still enjoying it), OR forcing them to walk more may make it feel less fun.. and in the long run they get fed up and walk less.

 

I don't see that happening so much with Geocaching. I Geocache because I enjoy it. I also enjoy looking at my various stats, but they NEVER make me feel "I'm not doing enough". They never take away from the enjoyment. However, one example where I have seen this is streaks. I've not tried to do a streak myself, but I have talked to friends with long streaks and they admitted the streak often made Geocaching a chore; "forcing" them to go find a cache when they would rather not.

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Interesting article.

 

Quote from the article: "Enjoyable activities can became almost like a job, by focusing on the outcomes of things that used to be fun."

 

The Fitbit example I can understand, but I don't think Geocaching is similar. E.g. someone who walks for an hour every day, and feels good about doing that, and enjoy it. Then they get a Fitbit which tells them a number of steps which is regarded as "not good enough". The person can react by walking more (and still enjoying it), OR forcing them to walk more may make it feel less fun.. and in the long run they get fed up and walk less.

 

I don't see that happening so much with Geocaching. I Geocache because I enjoy it. I also enjoy looking at my various stats, but they NEVER make me feel "I'm not doing enough". They never take away from the enjoyment. However, one example where I have seen this is streaks. I've not tried to do a streak myself, but I have talked to friends with long streaks and they admitted the streak often made Geocaching a chore; "forcing" them to go find a cache when they would rather not.

 

The difference is that some let the statistics dictate their caching. We go caching and see what we've done in the statistics but we don't look at our statistics to decide where/when/what we will go find. The same goes for a caching day, we don't start with the idea of finding xx caches today but when returning home we will take a look at how many we found. Finding 50 or just one makes no difference if the day out was worth it. In fact we even prefer doing just one multi with many WPs on our bikes in summer as opposed to a 50 traditional trail.

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In fact we even prefer doing just one multi with many WPs on our bikes in summer as opposed to a 50 traditional trail.

 

Me too. However due to those whose caching is driven by quantification and statistics driven goals for caching, it is more and more difficult for those who are driven by the experience along the way to find appropriate caches.

 

When I read through the thread about plans for the caching year 2016, almost all posts were of a quantitative type.

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In fact we even prefer doing just one multi with many WPs on our bikes in summer as opposed to a 50 traditional trail.

 

Me too. However due to those whose caching is driven by quantification and statistics driven goals for caching, it is more and more difficult for those who are driven by the experience along the way to find appropriate caches.

 

When I read through the thread about plans for the caching year 2016, almost all posts were of a quantitative type.

 

I don't have any difficulties finding the caches I like to find in the sea of geo-junk. I find it takes less energy to search for what I like to find than to complain about it and do nothing.

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I don't have any difficulties finding the caches I like to find in the sea of geo-junk. I find it takes less energy to search for what I like to find than to complain about it and do nothing.

 

Apparently you misunderstand my post. If the nice 20 stage multi cache does not get hidden, those who enjoy such caches cannot head out to find them.

The post was not about the issue of ignoring what ever cache you do not want to find (not necessarily geo-junk). In the end I often prefer to go for caches that are not attractive to me than to stay at home.

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However due to those whose caching is driven by quantification and statistics driven goals for caching, it is more and more difficult for those who are driven by the experience along the way to find appropriate caches.

 

When I read through the thread about plans for the caching year 2016, almost all posts were of a quantitative type.

 

I'm trying for both quantity and quality. Quantity is nice, but I will err on the side of quality.

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I have a FitBit. Generally speaking the goal isn't really about continually increasing step numbers. 10,000 steps a day is the recommended goal for "healthy activity." A FitBit makes you aware of what type/amount of activity is needed to achieve that daily benchmark. And of course it's great to do more if you like. But it's not about continually increasing step numbers. While with caching stats, it IS about continually raising numbers of souvenirs, finds or what ever. In my First Caching Life there were no such things as grids, stats, souvenirs, powertrails, etc. It was just having a good time being outdoors hunting for a cache--woohooo--I found it!!!. I'm a little surprised to see so many comments about caring about stats. I wonder if it's the influence of computer gaming where scores/achievements/stats/badges etc. are the objective. I don't pay attention to that stuff. I didn't even know I had any souvenirs til recently (or for that matter what a souvenir was). It's definitely harder to find experience-based caches these days. Gotta weed through slews of nanos and LPCs "to help your numbers" or "fill your grid" or meet a numbers "challenge." I will continue to Cache Simple and... keep an eye for the magic 10,000 on my FitBit! Caching is a great way to hit that FitBit number!

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I think there are as many differing opinions as there are geocaches. My sweetie and I just started this year and we don't pay attention to the stats. We enjoy finding challenging puzzles and we also do the virtual caches. We choose mostly by interesting areas and have been so pleased with the places we would never have found if not for geocaching. Just this weekend we found what is called a "Roller Barn". It can't be seen from any main road, you have to walk down an access road to this old barn that stores the rollers used by horses to keep the roads cleared of snow, before snow plows came into existence. There is a bench, some historical information and a spectacular view. And...you can go into the barn during special times of the year to check out the rollers and hear all about them from a historical perspective. How cool is that? Also, we especially love the cemeteries. Some of them are just so neat and the stones can be amazing. It's unbelievable just how many really unique places cemeteries exist. We would not have otherwise even found some of these out of the way, in the boonies places. I do know some folks who are very much into stats, and that's okay too. It's all about what keeps you interested in geocaching. It also gets us out and moving. Different strokes for different folks...as long as we are out there keeping the game alive....it's all good no matter what your interest. And thank you to everyone who posts in here. It has helped me understand so many things about geocaching.

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Or if you're so bored with everything geocaching has to offer because you've seen and done it all... go for this one: GCG822

 

The person who finds this one should do a mike drop and pull a Bobby Fischer disappearing act. Legend.

 

Of course the first to find this one would probably post a NM, tftc. :lol:

OH heck, I've been to that one twice. Was not all it is cracked up to be. Only seen two Great whites and One Giant squid on the way down.

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