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Charming243

Backpack?

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Im just curious on what other cachers pack and bring when caching?? I am fairly new and would love some more advice.

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I'm just a day hiker but I love my Camelbak Rim Runner 22. It has a huge 3L bladder and numerous large pockets to hold quite a bit of stuff! Hope that helps.

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Source Assault 20L Hydration Cargo Pack

 

This is a high-quality lightweight backpack with a 3L hydration bladder plus plenty of room for additional gear. I'd definitely recommend a backpack with a hydration bladder, it's a lot more convenient than fumbling around with a water bottle.

 

As for what other gear I take:

 

Smartphone (with geocaching app of course)

 

Portable charger for smartphone

 

Camera (Canon 60D)

 

Gorillapod (clipped to back of backpack)

 

Pen (+ backup pen)

 

Notepad

 

Torch

 

Hand wipes

 

Small first aid kit

 

Snacks

 

And I have a mini swiss army knife on my keychain that contains tweezers, that can be useful for some nano caches

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Source Assault 20L Hydration Cargo Pack

 

This is a high-quality lightweight backpack with a 3L hydration bladder plus plenty of room for additional gear. I'd definitely recommend a backpack with a hydration bladder, it's a lot more convenient than fumbling around with a water bottle.

 

Lightweight? No. My full on backpack has more than 3X the capacity, and weighs about 5 ounces less. I'd agree with durable though.

 

After more than 20 years as a devout hydration bladder user, I've jumped ship and returned to more traditional water bottles mounted on the front of my pack. My current system for day hikes is the SJ Vest by UD (11 ounces with empty bottles):

 

c071a2f7-84c4-4cc8-bb52-d06440887590.jpg

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I can provide a full inventory of my day pack if anyone is interested. Generally, I hike in the back country to find caches when I day hike so my pack is a work in progress as far as the essentials are concerned. Each item is planned to allow me to either navigate or survive at least three days in the wild including making a tent with a floor from a 10x10 tarp in case I become immobilized. In addition, I carry three forms of communication. My phone, a shortwave radio (GMS will also work), and an inReach. I also carry a harmonica to keep me occupied. Finally and most important, I leave a map of my planned location at home with my wife in case I become a permanent display of what not to do.

 

Overnights I always carry 2 days more rations than my planned trip.

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Howdy Tadpole,

 

What I take depends largely on where I'm going, how long I'll be out, and what the expected conditions are. For dayhiking, I carry an Osprey Daylite pack with the general essentials: snacks, extra layer/rainshirt, gps, knife, geocaching supplies (including extra batteries), a headlamp, a map, communication device, trinkets, and either a water filter (if there's a water supply) and collapsible water containers, or a water filter and a full hydration bladder (if it's a dry hike). If I'm out longer than a day, I basically just add the geocaching supplies to the same kit I hike the backcountry with on any normal trekking trip. I have the setup to do 1 day to months on the trail, I just have to adjust for time. If you have any questions about specific gear, feel free to e-mail!

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Hi.

I bought a new Backpack, the Camelbak BFM 500 OD Futura (built for french Army), with Antidote 3L reservoir.

I bought it not new, for 95CHF less than new price (175 instead 270).

It is as a new pack, I m really happy.

It is a big Pack (51.5 liters, 42 liters only the main compartiment), but not so heavy (2.2 kg empty).

Many pockets, inside and outside, and many MOLLE attaches, and scratch bands for patches.

We will see with time, but I m sure, it s a great pack.

camelbak-sac-bfm-500-od-futura.jpg

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If you are just going on a day's geocaching I would recommend the Keep Pursuing Sling bag. It is not made to carry a lot of stuff but the design is perfect for Geocaching. The main compartment can hold a regular gps unit, notebook and some travel bugs etc. The top zip opens into a padded compartment for your mobile device (designed to hold an iPad mini).

Worn as a front pack the compartments are easily accessible, making the exercise of getting out your device and pen very easy. Zip everything up and you can crawl around looking for that elusive cache.

Ready to head home? - just sling it on your back.

 

I often wear it with a backpack which carries water, snacks etc. When caching I can access all my caching stuff from the sling and only need to take off the pack for lunch and water breaks (I don't have a water bladder).

 

Worth a look.

 

http://www.keeppursuing.com/sling/

post-1417176-021626100 1456138968_thumb.jpg

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Charming, have you looked into the Florida Geocaching Associations?

 

They could be a big help to you as to what they carry. I'm sure they have events in which you could meet folks and learn a lot from the various members. They may even have a list of Tools of the Trade. :unsure:

 

Good luck on your quest.

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In keeping with the spirit of the day, I present the ultimate in backpacking comfort and responsiveness :rolleyes: :

 

1b522b33-de1f-45b8-a2b1-9ddd83aead70.jpg

 

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As a true backpack addict, you are all officially enablers at this point. :P

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Depending on my plans I take a variety of stuff:

 

My everyday bag for going to work etc is a 20l Eastpak so if I'm caching on my way home from work/shopping I'll just have that with my smartphone, a pen, bottle of water and maybe a snack.

51nYtnBpJKL._AC_UL320_SR224,320_.jpg

 

For day hikes I have a Deuter Futura 28l with a hydration bladder and in addition to the above will carry my Garmin GPSr, more food and a small first aid/medication kit, if it's a wilderness area or I think I'll need extra clothing I'll take a map and compass, waterproofs, hat and gloves and maybe some trekking poles.

998_img1_598x1196.jpg

 

For overnight hikes taking in a mountain hut or cabin I'll use my Lowe Alpine Khumbu pack which is 65-80l and I'll add spare clothes, sleeping equipment, cooking kit and food, toilet roll, bivvy bag and some coal or firewood for the fire.

7605_enlarged.jpg

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In keeping with the spirit of the day, I present the ultimate in backpacking comfort and responsiveness :rolleyes: :

 

1b522b33-de1f-45b8-a2b1-9ddd83aead70.jpg

 

dadgum .....Groundspeak need to implement a like button. Excellent post.

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Im just curious on what other cachers pack and bring when caching?? I am fairly new and would love some more advice.

 

short 5 mile hike just the smartphone

short 25 mile dual sport ride just the smartphone

hard hike smartphone and camelbak

hard single track smartphone and 40 liter osprey with bladder/tools/hammock/food/etc

 

the stuff in the packs varies according to the hike/ride/camp conditions.

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I carry a 25L backpack - too big for casual caching (when not far from car) and a touch small for true day-hike stuff (but I need to pack for a child too). I make sure, if we are in a remote area that we have emergency communications (PLB/Find Me Spot) and gear to survive comfortably overnight if we were to get stuck (warm clothes, tarp for a cover, fire lighters). Also of course is food/water/first aid/TOTTs/pens etc etc

 

I've thought of getting two packs due to the above size probs, but then I know I will not have stuff I want/need because it will be in the other pack....

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I'd start by making a list of what you want to take, then figuring out how big a pack you need to carry it all. As a newbie, you may not have seen a list of the ten essentials you should take on a day-hike. Here's a version of that, from our website:

 

The Ten Essentials for Hiking

 

Does it really have to be ten? We’re not so sure. We’ve certainly seen a lot of lists that include things we would never take backpacking. Like what, you might ask? Well, since you asked…

 

A lot of these lists include a big heavy knife. Why? The explanation is that you need the knife to chop kindling for a fire, ward off bears, and maybe look more masculine on the trail or something. We find that tiny pocket knife does just fine to cut our salami and cheese for lunch. We don’t make fires, don’t whittle down trees for fun, and don’t imagine using a knife to ward off any wildlife except for the occasional dead trout.

 

What about a multi-tool? What is it going to fix? The sleeping bag? The tent? We’ve used our sewing kit to fix all sorts of things on the trail, and we’ve never found ourselves wishing we had a pair of pliers or a screwdriver. And it weighs a lot. Leave it at home.

 

We don’t take a cellphone on the trail, because where we hike, there is never any cellphone coverage. We do usually leave one in the car at the trailhead…but we usually have to drive at least an hour before we find any cellphone coverage.

 

What DO we take on a day hike? Let’s make the list, and see if we get to ten items;

 

1. Water. Always enough to get to our next water source. And a filter to make more.

 

2. A first aid kit. The basics (we’re not going to be doing any surgery on a day hike—we would go get help instead) but it does include band-aids, painkillers, an elastic bandage, a roll of gauze, some antibiotic cream, and a sewing kit.

 

3. A map and compass. We like to know where we are going, where we’ve been, and where we are. So should you.

 

4. Snacks. Because low blood sugar is a bad thing, and makes for stupid thinking and lousy hiking.

 

5. A bandana. You cannot imagine all the uses it has.

 

6. A jacket of some kind, just to keep us warm and possibly dry. So that if we have to leave someone for a couple of hours to get help, that person won’t freeze.

 

7. A mylar emergency blanket/shelter—helps keep you warm, dry, and can be used as a reflector to signal.

 

9. A small pocketknife and nail clippers---because your toenails can cause you grief on the trail.

 

10. Some kind of flashlight—just in case it all goes to hell, and you are still walking after dark.

 

11. Sunscreen/bug lotion. Obvious. Don’t forget it.

 

12. Matches. Just in case it all goes to hell, and you decide to stay put until daybreak.

 

OK—that’s twelve. Let’s see…what are we missing? Bug nets for our heads, camera, binoculars, foam pad for sitting, an extra chocolate bar as a surprise, a Sudoku book—no, wait, that’s the firestarter…

 

Look, the main thing is to not get stuck out there with no hope and no help. Always take a little more than you think you'll need, because it doesn't weigh much, and when you do need it, it will make a HUGE difference.

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That's a good list. As you gain experience and start taking longer day hikes, I would add a few items to it with the caveat: The deeper you go, the necessity to survive at least three days for SAR to find you is a reality if you find yourself immobilized.

 

In terms of communication:

  • Whistle. It reaches farther than simple yelling for help. I carry this. I personally proved this as an effective tool as a part of a victim team in a SAR rescue simulation. They couldn't hear me yell, but they definitely heard the whistle over a thousand feet away. Remember to step away from your partner before blowing it if you are able to.
  • Cell phone. Most folks hike within a reasonable distance and even though you might not be able to connect to a tower, a tower can triangulate your weak cell phone signal if you're within 15-20 miles of it. Many rescues have been accomplished with this ability.
  • FMRS/GMRS or VHF (requires a license) radio or satellite communicator. A lot of hikers carry the FMRS/GMRS to keep in touch with each other. You might get lucky. A VHF radio has a bigger reach if there are repeaters in the area. Do your research when you go this route so you know which repeaters are in the area. They are publicly listed. My VHF is hacked to access the GMRS/FMRS channels.
  • Satellite communicator of any type. They can reach a rescue center. Be careful to choose the one that works best for the area you'll be hiking in.

 

In terms of sustenance:

Enough food or snacks to be able to ration across three days. You would do well to start learning which flora in your area is edible to augment your rations. High calorie items like meal bars are have long expiration dates, lightweight, and you can easily open the packaging.

 

In terms of shelter:

A lightweight 10x10 tarp or fly with parachute cord. Tying the cord from tree to tree and draping the tarp makes a good temp shelter. If you have three tent stakes or can find three heavy rocks to act as anchors, you can make a small pup tent with a floor.

 

Long term night light (optional):

Chem sticks or a solar powered lantern (some collapse very flat). Getting up to pee in the middle of the night has caused more people to get lost or worse because they couldn't find their way back.

 

Critically the most important action you can take in all hikes:

Let someone know where you are going, possibly with a map marked with the location. More time is wasted looking for your car to start the rescue operation. It can take hours to days just for this one operation before rescue teams can be assembled.

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Great point about both the whistle---I can vouch for this from personal experience---and the idea of letting someone know where you are going and when you expect to be back. It doesn't cost a dime, and it makes life a lot easier for everyone else!

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I always take my cell phone with me. There have been times my phone was telling me no signal, but I was able to send and receive text messages.

 

I've also been carrying a PLB for several years now. Not so much that I'm in need of help, but it does give family and friend some piece of mind and also gives updates on position to approximate an ETA.

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Yeah---we usually don't take a phone. But on our last trip, my wife took my phone because she was reading a book on it. And we were surprised to see it had reception twelve miles into our hike....

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It's important to remember when you're out there, signals are based on line of sight snd sometimes reflected signals. If you find yourself in a steep valley, signal loss is a reality. However, if you find yourself in some kind of trouble, and you're able to reach higher ground, your reach can be significantly improved. This is with any radio or cell phone.

 

Case in point, when I was using GMRS/FMRS before I gained my Ham license, I was able to hear over 20 miles from Seattle and transmit over 15 miles to another hiker from the top of a peak at the edge of the Olympics. With my Ham VHF, I was able to transmit to a repeater 15 miles away on reflected signal when attempting to get in touch with a buddy stuck in the snow.

 

For those not in the know, most repeaters automatically broadcast with their call sign when you transmit to them the first time. You'll also know you're in possible reach of a repeater because they are required to broadcast their call sign every 10 minutes. This depends on the transmit power of your radio. This is an automated broadcast and does not indicate someone is manning the station. Sometimes this broadcast is verbal and sometimes it is in Morse code.

Edited by TotemLake
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I carry a  ILBE assualt pack fitted with a 3L  camelbak hydration bladder, a USGI emergency signal mirror, cell phone, compass, FOX-40 whistle, dual band hand held radio, first aid kit, emergency bivy, and of course my GPS.  All this does not add much weight to my pack  but assures that I can survive for a minimum of 24 hrs in the wilderness if needed.

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I'm sorta surprised by the amount of people who carry "tactical" or "assault" packs and don't have issues...

Issues a few times with sheeple on trails in a couple states, once on the AT in NJ I actually had rangers meet me on trail (a weekend walk), after a couple people mentioned my "threatening appearance"  -  that was only a large hydration pack in camo.   Though it is a busy spot some weekends, with mostly city dwellers (who don't even carry water...).   I thought scruffy thru hikers would look scarier than me...    :D

Staying light, most times these days I have all my needed gear (for an overnighter if need be) stuffed into a camera bag.  If I'm sure there's no water, maybe I'll opt for a small day pack to bring extra.

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On 07/09/2016 at 8:31 PM, Touchstone said:

I always take my cell phone with me. There have been times my phone was telling me no signal, but I was able to send and receive text messages.

 

I've also been carrying a PLB for several years now. Not so much that I'm in need of help, but it does give family and friend some piece of mind and also gives updates on position to approximate an ETA.

I know this is a UK/Europe specific video as far as most of the info goes,  but it may  help explain why you were able to text depite apparently having no signal

 

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